Applied Anthropology (15)

Scholarly works in applied anthropology.

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Anthropology of War, Book Cover The Anthropology of War

This edited collection contains important new material on the origins and role of warfare in “tribal” societies. The chapters focus on a number of basic research issues, including war and social evolution, causes of war, ideology of war, and European transformation of indigenous warfare patterns.

1990
“C” 
Catastrophe & Culture Catastrophe & Culture Edited by Susanna M. Hoffman and Anthony Oliver-Smith At a time of increasing globalization and worldwide vulnerability, the study of disasters has become an important focus for anthropological research-one where the four fields of anthropology are synthesized to address the multidimensionality of the effects to a community’s social structures and relationship to the environment. 2002
Community Building in the Twenty-First Century Community Building in the Twenty-First Century Edited by Stanley E. Hyland “Community” has long been a critical concept for social scientists, and never more so amid the growing economic inequity, natural and human disasters, and warfare of the opening years of the twenty-first century. In this volume, leading scholar-activists develop a conceptual framework for both the theory and practice of building communities. 2005
Confronting Cancer Confronting Cancer Edited by Juliet McMullin and Diane Weiner In this book, anthropologists examine the lived experiences of individuals confronting cancer and reveal the social context in which prevention and treatment may succeed or fail. 2009
“D” 
Dangerous Liaisons Dangerous Liaisons Edited by Laura McNamara and Robert A. Rubinstein Dangerous Liaisons is a book about intersections. It is a product of two year’s worth of discussion among a group of ethnographers from four different countries studying war, violence, the military, and the state. 2011
Development & Dispossession Development & Dispossession Edited by Anthony Oliver-Smith Resettlement has been so poorly planned, financed, implemented, and administered that these projects end up being “development disasters.” Because there can be no return to land submerged under a dam-created lake or to a neighborhood buried under a stadium or throughway, the solutions devised to meet the needs of people displaced by development must be durable. The contributors to this volume analyze the failures of existing resettlement policies and propose just such durable solutions. 2009
“E” 
The Evolution of Political Systems, Book Cover The Evolution of Political Systems

Throughout the world, the development of agriculture produced dramatic changes in human cultural systems. As people settled down in one locality, populations grew rapidly, patterns of subsistence were transformed, technology became more advanced, and the nature of social and political relations changed. People no longer interacted exclusively with kin, as they had in the past when organized in bands, and new forms of political relationships between groups were established. The emergence of these political systems was the first step in the evolution of the state. 

1990
“G” 
Global Health in Times of Violence Global Health in Times of Violence Edited by Barbara Rylko-Bauer, Linda Whiteford, and Paul Farmer Over 24 million people have died in these conflicts, and millions more suffered illness and injury. In this volume, leading scholars and practitioners examine the impact of structural, military, and communal violence on health, psychosocial well-being, and health care delivery. By investigating the fields of violence that define our modern world, the authors are able to provide alternative global health paradigms that can be used to develop more effective policies and programs. 2009
Globalization, Water, & Health Globalization, Water, & Health Edited by Linda Whiteford and Scott Whiteford This book is about crime and passion, life and death, lofty goals and squalid realities. It is a book about water. Global disparities in health and access to water are two major threats to world stability. 2005
Gray Areas Gray Areas Edited by Philip B. Stafford This volume features ten scholars from anthropology, nursing, sociology, gerontology, human geography, and other disciplines who provide ethnographic case studies exploring critical care decision-making, models of care for people with Alzheimer’s disease, the way residents cope with the limitations, indignities, and opportunities of nursing home life, the roles of family members and nursing home employees, and the formulation of assisted living. 2003
“H” 
Half-Lives & Half-Truths Half-Lives & Half-Truths Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston The long Cold War of the twentieth century has ended, but only now are the poisonous legacies of that “first nuclear age” coming to light. Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments. 2007
“I” 
Indians & Energy Indians & Energy Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner The authors consider the complex relationship between development and Indian communities in the Southwest in order to reveal how an understanding of patterns in the past can guide policies and decisions in the future. 2010
“M” 
(Mis)managing Migration (Mis)managing Migration Edited by David Griffith Today managed migration is growing in North America. This mirrors the general growth of migration from poorer to richer countries, with more than 200 million people now living outside their natal countries. Faced with this phenomenon, managed migration enables nation-states to regulate those population movements; direct foreign nationals to specific, identified economic sectors that citizens are less likely to care about; match employers who claim labor shortages with highly motivated workers; and offer people from poorer countries higher earning potential abroad through temporary absence from their families and homelands. 2014
“R” 
Remaking Life & Death Remaking Life & Death Edited by Sarah Franklin and Margaret Lock The boundaries of life now occupy a place of central concern among biological anthropologists. Because of the centrality of the modern biological definition of life to Euro-American medicine and anthropology, the definition of life itself and its contestation exemplify competing uses of knowledge. 2003
“T” 
Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective Turko-Persia in Historical Perspective

The Islamic culture that developed in the ninth and tenth century in what is now Eastern Iran was to have a significant impact on most Muslims of west, south, and central Asia. Under the patronage of Persianized Turkic Muslim rulers, the culture spread westward to the Mediterranean and eastward to India. Especially in the early centuries of Islam, Turko-Persia represented a distinctive variant of Islamic life and thought in these regions, particularly among the elite. But after the fifteenth century regional variants started to emerge.

1991
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