Ruth M. Van Dyke

2015, March 3–4
Chaco and Cahokia: Histories, Landscapes, and HinterlandsShort SeminarChaco and Cahokia: Histories, Landscapes, and HinterlandsThis seminar convened to evaluate the current state of research and theoretical issues for Chaco and Cahokia, their respective hinterlands, and to lay the groundwork for a truly continental archaeology by considering connections to Mesoamerica.
2013
Big Histories, Human LivesSAR Press PublicationBig Histories, Human Lives: Tackling Problems of Scale in ArchaeologyThe contributors consider something archaeologists seldom think about: the intersection of micro-scale human experience with large-scale and long-term histories.
2009, September 26–October 2
Toward a Global Human HistoryAdvanced SeminarToward a Global Human History: Agency and the Explanation of Long-Term ChangeWhy do there appear to have been long periods of little change early in human archaeological history? Can we square such explanations with those we use to explain, say, the state?
2008
The Chaco ExperienceSAR Press PublicationThe Chaco Experience: Landscape and Ideology at the Center PlaceIn a remote canyon in northwest New Mexico, thousand-year-old sandstone walls waver in the sunlight, stretching like ancient vertebrae against a turquoise sky. This storied place—Chaco Canyon—carries multiple layers of meaning for Native Americans and archaeologists, writers and tourists, explorers and artists.
2006
The Archaeology of Chaco CanyonSAR Press PublicationThe Archaeology of Chaco Canyon: An Eleventh-Century Pueblo Regional CenterThe site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology.
2004
In Search of ChacoSAR Press PublicationIn Search of Chaco: New Approaches to an Archaeological EnigmaStartling discoveries and impassioned debates have emerged from the “Chaco Phenomenon” since the publication of New Light on Chaco Canyon twenty years ago. This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers.
2003, May 4–7
Short SeminarChaco Synthesis
2000–2001
National Endowment for the Humanities Resident ScholarLived Landscapes, Constructed Pasts: Memory, Phenomenology, and Chacoan Society


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