Robert J. Sharer

2005
CopánSAR Press PublicationCopán: The History of an Ancient Maya KingdomThis volume collects leading scholarship on one of the most important archaeological complexes in the ancient Maya world. The authors-internationally renowned experts who participated in the long-running Copán Acropolis Archaeological Project-address enduring themes in Maya archaeology.
2003
TikalSAR Press PublicationTikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, & Affairs of State: Advancing Maya ArchaeologyNew insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal's rulers.
1999, September 26–30
Advanced SeminarChanging Perspectives on Tikal and the Development of Ancient Maya CivilizationThe Advanced Seminar participants included eight scholars who worked at Tikal during the 1950s and 1960s. Of particular value was the sharing of new information about Tikal that has emerged since the close of the fieldwork there. Thirty years represents a relatively short a period of time, but, said seminar chair Jeremy Sabloff, “for Maya studies, it is like an eternity.”
1991
Classic Maya Political HistorySAR Press PublicationClassic Maya Political History: Hieroglyphic and Archaeological Evidence Ancient Maya civilization once flourished in the rainforests of what is today southern Mexico and Central America. It possessed the only full system of writing ever to be developed in the Americas. The pace of decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing has accelerated in the last few years, and half of the inscriptions from the sites of the Classic Period (AD 250–900) have now been read. Much of the newly available information consists of historical records of the careers of Maya rulers of the time.
1989
Regional Perspectives on the Olmec, Book CoverSAR Press PublicationRegional Perspectives on the Olmec

The archaeological culture known as the Olmec has long been associated with the genesis of civilization in Mexico—the transition from simple, agricultural societies to near-urban states during the Mesoamerican Formative, which culminated in the empire of the Maya. 

1984
The Archaeology of Lower Central AmericaSAR Press PublicationThe Archaeology of Lower Central AmericaThis book provides a much-needed overview of the archaeological past, present, and future of lower Central America. It addresses questions such as why the region never produced complex societies like its neighbors to the north and south and takes up themes such as ecological adaptation and subsistence, trade, and sociopolitical development.
1983, November 7–11
Advanced SeminarOlmec Culture: Processes and Implications of Olmec Diffusion


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