Pradeep Jeganathan

2004
ViolenceSAR Press PublicationViolenceCan we understand violence not as evidence of cultural rupture but as a form of cultural expression itself? Ten prominent scholars engage this question across geographies as diverse at their theoretical positions, in cases drawn from fieldwork in Indonesia, Cambodia, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South America, Sri Lanka, Spain, and the United States.
2004
Anthropology in the Margins of the StateSAR Press PublicationAnthropology in the Margins of the StateThe very form and reach of the modern state are changing radically under the pressure of globalization. Featuring nine of the leading scholars in the field, this innovative exploration of these transformations develops an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: Africa, Latin America, and South Asia.
2002, April 28–May 2
Advanced SeminarCulture and Conflict: The Poetics of Violent Practice“Culture and Conflict: The Poetics of Violent Practice,” took place April 28-May 2, 2002. Two discussants joined the eight participants whose papers examined violent practice in a range of cultures including those of West Africa, the Khmer Rouge, Rwanda, the Basque region of Spain, and the United States. Neil Whitehead, who chaired the seminar, described the purpose of the seminar as “seeking an understanding of violence as a cultural expression.”
2001, April 22–26
Advanced SeminarThe State at its Margins: Comparative Ethnographies of the Modern State in Africa, Latin America and South AsiaThis seminar was designed to develop an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where both state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: South Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Understanding how people perceive and experience the agency of the state was a central theme of the seminar. “A driving question for our sessions was—‘how is the state experienced on a daily basis?’” said Deborah Poole.


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