Peter R. Schmidt

2009
Postcolonial Archaeologies in AfricaSAR Press PublicationPostcolonial Archaeologies in AfricaPostcolonial Archaeologies in Africa features some of the foremost archaeologists from Africa and the United States and presents cutting-edge proposals for how archaeology in Africa today can be made more relevant to the needs of local communities.
1995
Making Alternative HistoriesSAR Press PublicationMaking Alternative Histories: The Practice of Archaeology and History in Non-Western SettingsAfter working in Third World contexts for more than a century, many archaeologists from the West have yet to hear and understand the voices of their colleagues in non-Western cultural settings. In Making Alternative Histories, eleven scholars from Africa, India, Latin America, North America, and Europe debate and discuss how to respond to the erasures of local histories by colonialism, neocolonial influences, and the practice of archaeology and history as we know them today in North America and much of the Western world.
1994
Historical EcologySAR Press PublicationHistorical Ecology: Cultural Knowledge and Changing LandscapesEnvironmental change is one of the most pressing problems facing the world community. In this volume, the authors take a critical step toward establishing a new environmental science by deconstructing the traditional culture/nature dichotomy and placing human/environmental interaction at the center of any new attempts to deal with global environmental change.
1992, April 26–30
Advanced SeminarMaking Alternative Histories
1991
Classic Maya Political HistorySAR Press PublicationClassic Maya Political History: Hieroglyphic and Archaeological Evidence Ancient Maya civilization once flourished in the rainforests of what is today southern Mexico and Central America. It possessed the only full system of writing ever to be developed in the Americas. The pace of decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing has accelerated in the last few years, and half of the inscriptions from the sites of the Classic Period (AD 250–900) have now been read. Much of the newly available information consists of historical records of the careers of Maya rulers of the time.
1983
Shipwreck AnthropologySAR Press PublicationShipwreck Anthropology

“Shipwrecks are part of the legitimate domain of anthropology and can produce results that are as significant for our ability to explain variability in human behavior as any other kind of archaeology, whether it deals with stone tools in a European Paleolithic rockshelter or ceramics contained in a sixteenth-century Spanish shipwreck.” So argues Richard A. Gould, the editor of this volume originating from a 1981 School of American Research advanced seminar.



Follow us: