Past Events

The listing below shows events at SAR that have already taken place.

November 2014
URBN NDN, 2014 Artist Talk
Thursday, November 20, 2014, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Ehren Kee Natay: Artist Talk, Reception, Open Studio 2014 Rollin and Mary Ella King Fellow Pleae join Ehren Kee Natay (Kewa/Diné) as he discusses his work during his fellowship at SAR. Natay is a two-dimensional designer and painter interested in examining issues such as cultural amnesia, cross-cultural exchange, gender roles, and the exploration of heritage.
Colloquium
Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free From Gypsy Work to EU Recycling: Waste, Race, and Environment in Bulgaria Elana Resnick, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Understanding how waste is produced, collected, stored, circulated, transformed, destroyed, and defined can tell us much about the organization of social life. This becomes clear when observing the Roma (Gypsy) minority in Bulgaria, who comprise about 10 percent of the total population.
Mexican Inquisition Sparks
Tuesday, November 11, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free The Mexican Inquisition in Early Eighteenth-Century New Mexico Linda Tigges & Richard Salazar Early eighteenth-century documents in the Spanish Archives of New Mexico and Mexico City describe the inquisition investigations by the Franciscans into witchcraft, dress, marriage and bigamy, and other aspects of moral behavior of the New Mexico residents.
Colloquium
Wednesday, November 5, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Promise of Infrastructure: Advanced Seminar Chairs Nikhil Anand, Chair, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Environment and Society, University of Minnesota; Hannah Appel, Chair, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, UCLA; Akhil Gupta, Chair ,Professor, Department of Anthropology, UCLA The tension between aspiration and failure, technological progress and its underbelly, makes the everyday life of infrastructure a productive location to examine the entanglements of technology and biopolitics in social life.
October 2014
Guaje Ruin Kiva in 2005 Field Trip
Friday, October 31, 2014, 8:00 am–4:00 pm Guaje Canyon: Archaeology and Fire on the Pajarito Plateau Trip Leaders: Rory Gauthier and Dr. Craig Allen One extensive group of ruins that we will visit lies on the high, narrow mesa north of Guaje Canyon. Here, at least seven ruins are spread along the crest of the mesa, including five kivas that are carved into the tufa bedrock. A string of fifty cavate rooms are found along the base of the canyon, which were accessible to the mesa village by hand- and toe-holds and carved stairs.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 29, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Changing Roles of Ethnicity and Education as Determinants of Fertility: The Case of Kinshasa David Shapiro, Professor of Economics, Demography and Women's Studies, Pennsylvania State University In the mid-1950s, a large-scale survey carried out in the Belgian Congo found substantial differences in fertility of different ethnic groups, with groups from the north of the country in particular showing comparatively low fertility and a high incidence of sterility.
Nicole Taylor, Director of Scholar Programs, holding the 2012 J. I. Staley Prize Winning Book Lecture
Thursday, October 23, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Evolution and Women’s Lives Wenda Trevathan Biological anthropologist Wenda Trevathan discusses why our experiences with adolescence, pregnancy, birth, nursing, sexuality, and menopause have little in common with what is believed to have been the experience of our ancestors.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 22, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt and Spanish Reconquest at Tunyo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico Joseph Aguilar, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR The first systematic investigations at the mesa-top refuge community of Tunyo at San Ildefonso Pueblo offer new insights into the pivotal post-revolt period of pueblo history, where in 1694 nine Tewa villages led a successful defense against the reconquest efforts of Don Diego de Vargas.
Governor Bent Field Trip
Friday, October 17, 2014, 8:00 am–5:00 pm Rebellion in Taos: the Uprising of 1847 Trip Leader: Robert J. Tórrez The years 1846 and 1847 were volatile times in New Mexico, particularly in Taos and Taos Pueblo. On January 19, 1847, Governor Bent, his brother-in-law, and four US-appointed local officials were murdered in Taos. The revolt against the newly instituted US authorities quickly spread to Mora and other communities in northern New Mexico.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Indigenous Militancy and Creativity in the Peruvian Amazon: A Forty-Year Perspective on the Awajún Struggle for Cultural Survival Michael Brown, President of the School for Advanced Research The Awajún (Aguaruna) people of Peru’s Upper Amazon have emerged as one of South America’s most influential indigenous societies, known for an ironclad commitment to self-determination and an ability to mobilize other indigenous peoples in common cause.
Make Haste to Live movie poster Sparks
Tuesday, October 14, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Filmed in New Mexico Jeff Berg Since Thomas Edison’s film crew stopped at Isleta Pueblo in 1897 and filmed a one-minute loop segment, movie-making in New Mexico has been a constant. The state’s film history includes nearly 700 feature films, television episodes, and made for cable/TV movies.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Comanche New Mexico: Indigenous Archives Severin Fowles, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR We are accustomed to describing eighteenth century New Mexico as a Spanish colony and reading its history from this perspective.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 1, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Race, Identity, and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians Kelly Fayard, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bowdoin College, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The Poarch Band of Creek Indians, first noted in published records in the 1940s by anthropologist Frank Speck, is located in Alabama, a place where many incorrectly assume that no Native people remain.
September 2014
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Living at the Base of an Active Volcano: Search for Serenity Doug Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research A volcano on an isolated island north of Sicily named Stromboli erupts every fifteen minutes or so sending hot ash and flames several feet into the air. About every ten years, it erupts violently with deadly force. How do people cope with living with this danger?
Eagle Trap Field Trip
Friday, September 19, 2014, 9:00 am–3:00 pm Burnt Mesa Pueblo and Eagle Traps Trip Leaders: Rory Gauthier and Robert Powers Burnt Mesa, above Frijoles Canyon in Bandelier National Park, was ravaged by the 1977 La Mesa Fire, which changed the visual landscape of Bandelier’s northern boundary. The once-prominent ponderosa forest has transitioned into grass and shrubs, which have attracted elk into the park. This open landscape has allowed visitors to more easily notice the numerous rock mound sites signifying Ancestral Puebloan life on the mesa.
Newborn Baby Lecture
Thursday, September 18, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Whence Language? The Role of Mothers and Infants Dean Falk Evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk explores how and why baby talk, musical speech, or “motherese” first appeared in our ancestors and the likely role of prehistoric mothers and infants in the subsequent origin of symbolic language.
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 17, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Game of Scientific Clue: It's Humans in the Anthropocene with the Water Mike Agar The issue of water supply and quality in a time of population growth and climate change is a perfect example of the premise that humans have so impacted the Earth that we have entered a new epoch, which many refer to as the Anthropocene.
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 10, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2014-2015 Resident Scholars, the Native Artist Fellow, and the Anne Ray Interns
New Mexico Weather Extremes Sparks
Tuesday, September 9, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Climate Variability & Extreme Events in New Mexico Deirdre Kann This presentation will cover topics that link weather, climate, and extreme events. Examples of natural climate variability will be described and related to our local weather, including drought, floods, wind, and dust storms.
August 2014
Tour
Thursday, August 21–Friday, August 22, 2014, $20 per person IARC Tours During Indian Market Special tours of the IARC 12,000-piece collection of Indian arts during Indian Market 2014.
Satellite image of Valles Caldera Field Trip
Friday, August 15, 2014, 8:00 am–4:00 pm Archaeology and Geology of the Valles Caldera Trip Leaders: Ana Steffen and Kirt Kempter Join us for an insightful and exclusive trip into the heart of the Valles Caldera National Preserve with Cultural Resources Coordinator Ana Steffen and geologist Kirt Kempter. Known for its distinctive caldera rim, expansive grasslands with elk herds, and its cultural importance to local pueblos, the Valles Caldera has developed an allure that makes visitors want to return time and time again to seek out its solitude and beauty.
Satellite image of Valles Caldera Field Trip
Wednesday, August 13, 2014, 8:00 am–4:00 pm Archaeology and Geology of the Valles Caldera Trip Leaders: Ana Steffen and Kirt Kempter Join us for an insightful and exclusive trip into the heart of the Valles Caldera National Preserve with Cultural Resources Coordinator Ana Steffen and geologist Kirt Kempter. Known for its distinctive caldera rim, expansive grasslands with elk herds, and its cultural importance to local pueblos, the Valles Caldera has developed an allure that makes visitors want to return time and time again to seek out its solitude and beauty.
Apache fiddle (tsíí’edo’a’tl) Artist Talk
Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Anthony Belvado: Artist Talk, Reception, Open Studio 2014 Ronald and Susan Dubin Fellow Please join Anthony Belvado as he discusses his work at the School for Advanced Research. While at SAR, Anthony has been working to construct at least one tsíí’ edo’a’tl (Apache fiddle), which are relatively rare and little documented. His talk will be followed by a visit to the Dubin Studio to view his work.
July 2014
Adriana M. Petryna Colloquium
Wednesday, July 30, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free What is a Horizon? Extinction and Time amid Climate Change Adriana M. Petryna, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation is part of a broader project that examines emerging scientific practices meant to monitor increasingly unpredictable ecosystemic behaviors (from mega-storms to sea level rise) and to inform prospective thinking about how natural systems and societal infrastructures might adapt to imminent ecological dangers linked to global climate change.
Miguel Diaz-Barriga Colloquium
Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Sovereignty, Citizenship, and the US-Mexico Border Wall Miguel Diaz-Barriga, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR; Margaret Ellen Dorsey, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, and Curator of the Border Studies Archive, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation focuses on how Mexican-American and Native American residents of South Texas have protested and in some cases negotiated the design and placement of the US-Mexico border wall.
Barbara J. Mills Colloquium
Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Re-connecting the Past: Network Approaches to Regional Interaction in the Archaeology of the Late Prehispanic Southwest Barbara J. Mills, Professor, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, and Cotsen Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation addresses how network analyses are being used by archaeologists in the Southwest to understand the dynamics of social interactions in the past.
Anasazi America: Seventeen Centuries on the Road from Center Place, Second Edition Book Event
Sunday, July 13, 2014, 12:00 pm Book Signing by SAR Senior Scholar Dr. David E. Stuart Dr. David E. Stuart Dr. Stuart will present the second edition of his book Anasazi America at noon on Sunday, July 13th, at Garcia Street Books in Santa Fe. The first edition of the book, published in 2000, sold well over 20,000 copies and this new edition, much expanded, explores in-depth the dynamics that led to the creation of Chacoan society.
Carol Ann MacLennan Colloquium
Wednesday, July 9, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mining and Water Pollution: The Experience of Two Copper Districts in Michigan and New Mexico Carol Ann MacLennan, Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation investigates the experiences with mining waste from copper production in water-rich and water-scarce environments.
Anasazi America: Seventeen Centuries on the Road from Center Place, Second Edition Book Event
Monday, July 7, 2014, 11:00 am Book Signing by SAR Senior Scholar Dr. David E. Stuart Dr. David E. Stuart Dr. Stuart will present the second edition of his book Anasazi America at 11 a.m on Monday, July 7th, at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque. The first edition of the book, published in 2000, sold well over 20,000 copies and this new edition, much expanded, explores in-depth the dynamics that led to the creation of Chacoan society.
June 2014
João Biehl Colloquium
Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Valley of Lamentation João Biehl, Susan Dod Brown Professor, Department of Anthropology, Princeton University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation explores the Mucker War, a religious and fratricidal conflict that shattered the German settlements of southern Brazil in the nineteenth century.
Polychrome water jar with bird and sun designs by Joseph Latoma, clay and paint, 2012 Special Event
Friday, June 20, 2014, 10:00 am–4:00 pm, Free Celebrating San Felipe Pottery: A Community Event Please join us for a community celebration highlighting the rich but relatively unknown history of San Felipe Pueblo pottery.
May 2014
Picuris Mural Lecture
Thursday, May 29, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers God is Red, Still! Severin Fowles Anthropologist Severin Fowles draws upon the rich history of the Pueblo people of the American Southwest in an illustrated talk on author Vine Deloria’s classic analysis of Native American place-based theologies.
Iva Honyestewa Artist Talk
Thursday, May 22, 2014, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Iva Honyestewa: Artist Talk, Reception, Open Studio 2014 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow Join the School for Advanced Research on May 22 to hear about Iva Honyestewa's experience as the 2014 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow.
Amy Lonetree Colloquium
Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Research with, by, and for Native Communities: Writing a Visual History of the Ho-Chunk Nation, 1879–1960 Amy Lonetree, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation focuses on the process of writing a tribal history that places at the center of analysis photographs and film imagery from two significant collections currently housed at the Wisconsin Historical Society: the Charles Van Schaick Collection and the Bennett Family Collection.
Postcommodity. Symposium
Friday, May 16, 2014, 1:00–6:30 pm, Free, Reservations Required Transformation(s): Cultural Spaces, Indigenous Peoples, and Arts Organizers: Patricia Baudino and Jordan Wilson, Anne Ray Interns Emanating from a place of Indigenous transformation and activism, many museums and art institutions continue to respond to the call for new practices that de-center the traditional knowledge of these institutions. These transformations are altering knowledge and practices and, arguably, their purpose. The afternoon’s events will include panels consisting of curators, artists, scholars, and museum professionals who will discuss these transformations in the arts and culture fields.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Costly and Cute: How Helpless Newborns Made Us Human Advanced Seminar, Chairs: Karen R. Rosenberg, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Delaware and Wenda R. Trevathan, Regents Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces The extremely helpless and highly dependent state of the human infant at birth may have been as important in contributing to human biological and cultural evolution as “man the hunter” and “woman the gatherer.”
Administration Building, Spring 2012 Special Event
Sunday, May 11, 2014, 1:00–4:00 pm, $5 per person 2014 Mother’s Day Tour of Notable Historic Buildings The Historic Santa Fe Foundation is delighted to continue its custom of past tours by highlighting historic properties not always open to the public.
SAR Logo Field Trip
Saturday, May 10, 2014, 8:00 am–3:30 pm The Tewa World: Posi-Ouinge and Santa Clara Pueblo Trip Leaders: Kurt Anschuetz and Porter Swentzell The Tewa people have lived in northern New Mexico for centuries, including the modern villages of Santa Clara, Okhay Owingeh, San Ildefonso, Tesuque, Pojoaque, and Nambe Pueblos. The ancestral villages of the Tewa are scattered along the tributaries of the Rio Chama and Rio Grande, including the archaeological site called “Posi-Ouinge” located near Ojo Caliente.
Islah Jad Colloquium
Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Empowering Women amidst Conflict and Contesting Power in Chaos: Palestinian Women, Local Councils, and Democracy on the West Bank and Gaza Islah Jad, Associate Professor and Director, Women's Studies Institute, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine, and Campbell Scholar, SAR Classic literature portrays local governments as an important path for decentralizing the often centralized state power, thus involving people at the grass roots level to share power. Women, in this context and according to women’s rights universal conventions, can be seen as better served and more empowered.
Ancestral Navajo Field Trip
Thursday, May 1–Saturday, May 3, 2014 Ancestral Navajo: Rock Art and Pueblitos de Dinétah Trip Leader: Larry Baker The remote landscape of northwestern New Mexico is known as Dinétah by the Navajo people. Scattered in this ancestral Navajo homeland are small defensive sites— pueblitos— that the Navajos constructed in the eighteenth century to protect themselves from slaving raids by neighboring Utes.
April 2014
Patricia Baudino Colloquium
Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations Patricia Baudino and Jordan Wilson, Anne Ray Interns, SAR “To be Able to Share: Manifesting Change through Collections-Based Collaboration” by Patricia Baudino; “An Oral History with Delbert Guerin” by Jordan Wilson
Lara Evans Speaker Series
Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 12:00 pm, Free Content and Analysis in Native Art: Moving Past Form and Function Lara Evans, Cherokee Nation, art historian, art history faculty, Institute of American Indian Arts
Kade Twist, Cherokee Nation, mixed media artist
Frank Buffalo Hyde, Nez Perce/Onondaga, painter
Carolyn Kastner, Curator, O’Keeffe Museum (moderator)
Many contemporary Native artists have expressed concern that their work is often examined in terms of materials, process, and function, while a more in-depth content analysis is overlooked. This panel discussion will take up this issue and address its history.
SAR Logo Field Trip
Friday, April 18, 2014, 8:00 am–5:00 pm Classic Period Pueblos of San Juan Mesa Trip Leaders: Michael Bremer and Chris Toya From the 14th century into the early historic period the ancestors of the modern Pueblo of Jemez lived and farmed the mesas above the Rio Jemez. Living in large pueblos acting as community centers with extensive networks of field houses and agriculture fields the population thrived in an environment that looked very different from the ponderosa pine forest we see today.
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Village Beside an Active Volcano: Searching For Serenity Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, SAR Schwartz will discuss his exploration of the island of Stromboli and how the residents cope with living in the shadow of a deadly volcano.
Wood Vendor Field Trip
Friday, April 11, 2014, 9:30 am–1:30 pm Historical Change in Downtown Santa Fe Trip Leader: Dr. Tomas Chávez How has Santa Fe changed in the past 400 years from Spanish Colonial days, the bustle of the Santa Fe Trail, the coming of the US Cavalry, the building of the railroad, and the rise of tourism? The changing faces of Santa Fe’s long and colorful history will be revealed to us by historian Dr. Tomas Chávez on a walking tour of the downtown area.
Don Quixote Sparks
Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Chasing History: Quixotic Quests for Artifacts, Art, and Heritage Thomas E. Chávez Using the literary model of Don Quixote, historian Thomas E. Chávez will reflect on his career and work for two of New Mexico’s premier cultural institutions—the Palace of the Governors and the National Hispanic Cultural Center.
Hanat Kotyiti Field Trip
Friday, April 4, 2014, 8:00 am–4:00 pm A Tour of Hanat Kotyiti and the Historic Village of La Cañada Trip Leaders: Dr. Joseph Suina, Rory Gauthier, and Robert Powers Today, the Keres-speaking village of Cochiti Pueblo lies along the banks of the Rio Grande. However, soon after the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, the people of Cochiti and other Pueblo people built more defensible pueblos on high, remote mesas to prepare for the return of the Spanish.
Kent Blansett Colloquium
Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Expressions of Red Power: A History of American Indian Rock 'n' Roll, 1960–Present Kent Blansett, Assistant Professor of History and Native American Studies at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR This colloquium will highlight the historic roots of American Indian Rock ‘n’ Roll and how Native musicians grappled with the larger political themes that emerged out of the Red Power movement.
March 2014
Ruins of Cahuachi, the ceremonial center in Nasca Lecture
Thursday, March 27, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers A Tale of Two Pilgrimage Centers: Chaco and Nasca John Kantner Archaeologist John Kantner compares the evolution of Chaco and Nasca as a way to understand how and why influential ceremonial centers emerged in the ancient human past.
Christi Belcourt Speaker Series
Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 12:00 pm, Free Sharing the Creative Spirit: Indigenous Community Art Projects Christi Belcourt and Sherry Farrell Racette, Métis, “Walking With Our Sisters”
Dylan Miner, Métis, “Anishnaabensag Biimskowebshkigewag” (Native Kids Ride Bikes)
Douglas Miles, San Carlos Apache/Akimel O’odham, Apache Skateboards
Andrea R. Hanley, Navajo, Membership and Program Manager, Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (moderator)
The importance of working with local and Native communities is becoming an increasingly common theme with contemporary artists. This panel discussion will examine three such community-based projects and their impact on both a local and national scale.
Locust Tree in Bloom, Spring 2012 Special Event
Thursday, March 13, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Special Speakers Event—The Emergence of a Revitalized Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century Barbara Tedlock, Distinguished Professor, Department of Anthropology, SUNY, Buffalo In this talk, Tedlock explores what she describes as “the radical decolonization” that is taking place within the discipline of anthropology.
Roy Kady Speaker Series
Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 12:00 pm, Free Artists, Natural Resources, and the Environment Rose Simpson, Santa Clara Pueblo, sculptor
Kathy Wallace, Karuk/Yurok/Hupa Valley, basket maker
Roy Kady, Navajo, weaver
Cynthia Chavez Lamar, IARC Director, School for Advanced Research (moderator)
Today artists working in many media can face challenges in creating their work due to depleted natural resources and environmental factors. The panelists will discuss their personal experiences and share their opinions regarding these challenges and how it can potentially impact their art.
Chimayó Sparks
Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Chasing Dichos Through Chimayó Don Usner The Hispanic village folk sayings called dichos, which peppered almost all conversation, are rarely heard anymore, but Usner and his mother have gathered a collection of nearly three hundred from Chimayó.
Brigantine or Launch Special Event
Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 6:00–7:00 pm, Free Whatever Happened to Cabeza de Vaca? Baker H. Morrow One of the most beloved explorers of the Southwest, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, wandered through southern New Mexico in the late 1520s and early 1530s, becoming the first European to walk across North America. His memoir of the trek, the Chronicles of the Narvaez Expedition, is also the first major narrative detailing the exploration of North America by Spanish conquistadors. But what became of him once his epic ten-year journey was finished? Baker Morrow presents a lively and illustrated talk on the life of Spanish explorer, Cabeza de Vaca.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Obesity Stigma, Upward Mobility, and Symbolic Body Capital in a Rapidly Changing World Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs Eileen Anderson-Fye, Robson Junior Professor, Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, and Alexandra Brewis Slade, Director and President’s Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change Arizona State University, Tempe The growing global prevalence of obesity is associated with modernization and the adoption of “Western” (i.e., North American) dietary and physical activity practices. Likewise, noted increase in stigma against overweight and obesity in societies that traditionally valued larger bodies is held to be a consequence of modernization.
February 2014
Abigail Winslow Bigham Colloquium
Wednesday, February 26, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Unravelling Genetic Responses to Life at High Altitude Abigail Winslow Bigham, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR Abigail Winslow Bigham and her colleagues conducted genotype-phenotype association studies among a group of Peruvian Quechua who lived at sea level and another group who lived at high altitude. In this talk Bigham presents their findings, which provide key insights into the patterns of genetic adaptation to high altitude in Andean populations, shed light on variants controlling this complex phenotype, and are of potential importance for public health.
Copper carving depicting a Sámi shaman with his magic drum. Lecture
Thursday, February 20, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Wayward Shamans: The Prehistory of an Idea Silvia Tomášková Anthropologist Silvia Tomášková examines the popular idea that humanity’s earliest expressions of art, religion, and creativity formed around the figure of a proto-priest known as a shaman.
Joan Naviyuk Kane Artist Talk
Thursday, February 13, 2014, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Joan Kane in Conversation with Malena Mörling 2014 Indigenous Writer-in-Residence SAR Indigenous Writer-in-Residence Joan Naviyuk Kane will give a reading of her work. Following a conversation with noted writer Malena Mörling, Kane will read excerpts from her recent writing. Kane, who is Inupiaq, is the author of Hyperboreal and The Cormorant Hunter’s Wife. She has a novel and a third poetry collection underway during her tenure at SAR.
Laurie Kain Hart Colloquium
Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Question of Ruins: Buildings and Persons after Political Violence Laurie Kain Hart, Stinnes Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Haverford College, Philadelphia, PA, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation explores two interrelated questions concerning the endurance and reconstitution of communities after civil war and “ethnic cleansing.”
Eva Fenyes, Leonora S.M. Curtin and Leonora Curtin Paloheimo with artists, 1919 Sparks
Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Eva Scott Fényes, Leonora Scott Muse Curtin, Leonora Curtin Paloheimo and the Cultural Crafting of Santa Fe Carmella Padilla Early twentieth-century Santa Fe was a hotbed of cultural inspiration and innovation. While men such as archaeologists Edgar Lee Hewett, Adolph Bandelier, and Sylvanus Morley, and photographer Charles Fletcher Lummis are commonly hailed as cultural giants of the period, three generations of extraordinary women had a major hand in the cultural crafting of Santa Fe.
He Li Colloquium
Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Ideas and Great Transformation in Post-Mao China He Li, Professor, Department of Political Science, Merrimack College, North Andover, MA, and Henry Luce Foundation Resident Scholar, SAR The purpose of this talk is to provide a brief overview of the major schools of political thought in post-Mao China. It examines the arguments of the major currents, describes their origins and development, and explores the contribution of the leading thinkers.
January 2014
Navajo-language Book of Mormon Lecture
Thursday, January 30, 2014, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Mormonism: Demystified, Globalized, Decolonized? Joanna Brooks Professor Joanna Brooks follows a new generation of Mormon indigenous writers and scholars who question what Mormonism has meant to their communities.
Jason De León and his son, Ignacio Colloquium
Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Noble Irish Ancestors and Filthy Mexican Invaders: The Uncomfortable Politics of the Archaeology of Undocumented Migration Jason De León, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR In this presentation De León discusses some of the current controversies surrounding the deployment of archaeological methods and theories to understand clandestine border crossings between Mexico and the United States.
Mabel Dodge Luhan Sparks
Tuesday, January 14, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Sex, Syphilis, and Pyschoanalysis in the Making of Modern American Culture: The Suppressed Memoirs of Mabel Dodge Luhan Lois Rudnick Lois Rudnick will use the stories that Luhan and her son and heir felt could not be told until long after her death to illustrate the complex ways in which venereal disease impacted the formation of women's sexual identities, the first women's movement of the twentieth century, modern art and literature, and the formation of psychoanalysis.
December 2013
Amy Lonetree Colloquium
Wednesday, December 18, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Visualizing Survivance: Reclaiming Ho-Chunk History Through the Photographs of Charles Van Schaick, 1879–1942 Amy Lonetree, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation will explore the importance of Charles Van Schaick's photographs and the representation of Ho-Chunk families in this unique and rich collection currently housed at the Wisconsin Historical Society.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, December 11, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Faith-Based Charity and the Security State: Containing People and Finance in Risk Societies Advanced Seminar chair Erica Caple James, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, MIT This talk will provide an overview of an advanced seminar that is exploring the ways in which faith-based humanitarian activities challenge notions of secularism, as well as conceptions of risk and security, in historical and cross-cultural contexts.
DeVargas Street, Barrio de Analco, 1894 Sparks
Tuesday, December 10, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Barrio de Analco: Its Roots in New Spain and Role in Colonial Santa Fe William H. Wroth This talk will place Santa Fe’s Barrio de Analco in a larger cultural and historical context. It will deal with the origins of the first settlers of the barrio and its later transformation into a genízaro community.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, December 4, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Places of Protocol: Memory, Archaeology, and Colonial Legacies on the Columbia River Jon Daehnke, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This presentation explores the development and use of the Cathlapotle Plankhouse located at the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge in Ridgefield, Washington.
November 2013
Will Wilson Artist Talk
Thursday, November 14, 2013, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Will Wilson: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2013 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow Will Wilson (Navajo) is widely recognized for his unusual approach to the world of photography. Please join us to hear about his experience as the 2013 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow.
Islah Jad Colloquium
Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Local Power and Women’s Empowerment in a Conflict Context: Palestinian Women Contesting Power in Chaos Islah Jad, Associate Professor and Director, Women's Studies Institute, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine, and Campbell Scholar, SAR In this presentation, Jad examines what it means for women to claim political representation in the highly complex context of Palestine, characterized by Israeli Occupation and a deep rift over political agendas and means of liberation.
Butterfly Dancers Sparks
Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Franciscan Influence among the Pueblo Peoples of the Southwest Antonio Trujillo In his talk, Antonio Trujillo will explore Franciscan spirituality and how it parallels the traditions of the Pueblo peoples.
Montoya’s Butte Field Trip
Friday, November 8–Sunday, November 10, 2013 The Archaeology of Cañada Alamosa Join SAR for a unique trip exploring prehistoric pueblos in the remote terrain of the Black Range southwest of Truth or Consequences, New Mexico.
Kent Blansett Colloquium
Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Complicating Red Power: A Political History of Mohawk Activist Richard Oakes, 1942–1972 Kent Blansett, Assistant Professor, Department of History and American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota, Morris, and Lamon Scholar, SAR This presentation explores the life of Native activist Richard Oakes and illustrates how his actions reflected a unique voice of Indigenous leadership within the Red Power movement of the 1960s–1970s.
October 2013
Laurie Kain Hart Colloquium
Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Place, Proximity, and the Transmission of Civil War through Time: Reflections on the Course of Two Balkan Wars, 1946–1949 and 1992–1995 Laurie Kain Hart, Stinnes Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Haverford College, and NEH Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation explores the sequelae of the Greek Civil War of 1946–1949 in the volatile border-zone of northwest Greek Macedonia for those who returned to home territory after extended forced exile.
Restored ancient chortens in the modern village of Manang Lecture
Thursday, October 24, 2013, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers An Archaeology of Tibetan Buddhism Mark Aldenderfer For the archaeologist, the material expression of Buddhism on the Tibetan Plateau offers insights into the transformation and evolution of Buddhist thought.
Jason De León and his son, Ignacio Colloquium
Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Undocumented: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail Jason De León, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Since 2009, Jason De Leon has directed the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a long-term anthropological analysis of clandestine border crossings between Northern Mexico and Southern Arizona.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Red and the White: The Saga of a Mixed-Race Family in Nineteenth-Century Montana Andrew Graybill, Associate Professor, Department of History, and Director, William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University Graybill explores the shifting grounds of race in Montana (and the wider West) between 1850 and 1900 through the experiences of a single family of mixed native-white ancestry.
Mimbres Bowl Field Trip
Saturday, October 12–Tuesday, October 15, 2013 The Classic Mimbres Culture Join us for a rare opportunity to spend four days immersed in the Mimbres culture of beautiful southwestern New Mexico.
Pueblo del Arroyo Special Event
Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 7:00–8:00 pm, Free Decline and Dissolution of the Chacoan World Lecture by David Stuart, SAR Interim President and Senior Scholar 1125 to 1325 CE saw the shattering of the growth-oriented Chaco phenomenon, a huge cultural cataclysm for prehistoric Southwestern farmers. Chacoan society was replaced by far smaller and more efficient successor societies.
Deborah Boehm Colloquium
Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Return(ed): The Temporalities and Geographies of Deportation Deborah Boehm, Associate Professor, Departments of Anthropology and Women's Studies, University, of Nevada, Reno, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This presentation considers the deportation of Mexican nationals from the United States, focusing on migrants with ties to the Mexican states of San Luis Potosí and Zacatecas and several locations throughout the western United States.
Archaeologist Sam Duwe at Tsi‑p'in‑owinge' Sparks
Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Becoming the Pueblo World Samuel Duwe Each Pueblo's homeland is defined by its physical landscape through prominent topographic features, modern villages, ancient ruins, and complex systems of shrines. The earliest Southwestern anthropologists made detailed notes of these sacred geographies and how they are used to bound cultural landscapes, represent Pueblo cosmology, and record history.
He Li Colloquium
Wednesday, October 2, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Chinese Intellectual Discourse on Confucianism and Its Impacts on China’s Transformation He Li, Professor, Department of Political Science, Merrimack College, and Luce Resident Scholar, SAR With the rapid economic growth that has occurred in the past three decades, an increasing number of Chinese intellectuals have become interested in revisiting their Confucian tradition.
September 2013
Pistol Colloquium
Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Moral Economy of Violence in the US Inner City: Ethnographic Notes from Puerto Rican North Philadelphia Philippe Bourgois, Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR; and George Karandinos, Student, Harvard Medical School, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR During an eight-week period in the four square blocks surrounding a North Philadelphia fieldwork site, there were sixteen shootings with three fatalities, three stabbings, and fourteen additional “aggravated assaults.”
Doorway in Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon Special Event
Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 7:00–8:00 pm, Free Energy Consumption and the Rise of Chacoan Society Lecture by David Stuart, SAR Interim President and Senior Scholar In this first public lecture on the complete findings of the multiyear “Finding the Calories” project, Stuart reports on the basic elements of nine centuries of change in patterns of energy use and acquisition required for Ancestral Puebloans to become Chacoans.
2011–2012 Membership Lectures—rev·o·lu·tions Colloquium
Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Insurgency and Social Interaction in the New Kingdom Egyptian Fortress in Jaffa: Entanglement as an Explanatory Model Aaron A. Burke, Associate Professor, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR For approximately 300 years, from c. 1460 to 1150 BCE, Egyptians controlled the former Canaanite port city of Jaffa (ancient Yapu), employing it as a staging ground for regular military campaigns into Canaan and the administration of its empire in the southern Levant....
Native Foods: Culinary Field Trip and Farm Tour Field Trip
Friday, September 13, 2013, 9:30 am–2:30 pm Lessons from Traditional Pueblo Farming Under the leadership of Dr. Richard I. Ford, a renowned ethnobotanist, we will explore the archaeology of pre-Hispanic agriculture and ethnobotany at Tesuque Pueblo.
Administration Building, Spring 2013 Colloquium
Wednesday, September 11, 2013, 12:00–1:30 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2013–2014 Resident Fellows
Students Against Uranium Mining members demonstrate on the steps of the Tenth Circuit Court in Denver, Colorado Sparks
Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Uranium Mining Threatens Mount Taylor Nadine Padilla and Eric Jantz Applications for the renewal of uranium mining operations on Mount Taylor are currently under consideration by the US Forest Service and New Mexico regulatory agencies. Mount Taylor is a culturally significant geographic and spiritual feature on New Mexico’s landscape.
Vault Two in the Indian Arts Research Center Symposium
Friday, September 6–Saturday, September 7, 2013, $50 students • $125 professionals Modernist Encounters and Contemporary Inquiry: Art, Appropriation, and Cultural Rights At this symposium, co-sponsored by the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center and the School for Advanced Research (SAR), encounters between American modernism and indigenous cultures will be discussed.
Pueblo Largo Field Trip
Friday, September 6, 2013, 8:00 am–3:30 pm Pueblos Largo and Colorado in the Galisteo Basin The Galisteo Basin of northern New Mexico is one of the premier archaeological regions in the Southwest. This region is less known to the public than the Pajarito Plateau because the land is primarily in private ownership and public access is limited.
August 2013
Monastery of Christ in the Desert Field Trip
Friday, August 23, 2013, 9:00 am–6:00 pm Spiritual Centers in Northern New Mexico Join us for an intriguing visit and conversation with leaders of two spiritual centers near Abiquiu, New Mexico: Dar al Islam and the Monastery of Christ in the Desert.
“Shard” pot by Daryl Candelaria, clay, paint, turquoise cabochon, c. 2007 Special Event
Thursday, August 15, 2013, 5:00–8:00 pm, Free San Felipe Pueblo Potters: Reception and Sale The Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research is pleased to present a historic gathering of San Felipe Pueblo potters. The event will include a meet-and-greet with the artists, an exclusive sale of their pottery, and the launch of the SAR online exhibit Evolution in Clay: San Felipe Pueblo Artists.
Polychrome bowl with “bat man” design by Daryl Candelaria, clay and paint, 1995. Tour
Thursday, August 15–Friday, August 16, 2013, $20 per person Indian Market Tours IARC at SAR is offering special tours of its collection of Native American art before Indian Market weekend, August 15–16.
Glenda McKay Artist Talk
Thursday, August 8, 2013, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Glenda McKay: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2013 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow Glenda McKay is Ingalik-Athabascan. She was born in Anchorage, Alaska, and was taught the skills she uses in doll making at an early age by her mother, grandmother, and aunts. Knowing how to embroider and bead; trap, snare, and tan hides; and gather fruit, roots, bark, and plants has served her well.
July 2013
Hannah H. Voorhees Colloquium
Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Delaying Loss: Dilemmas of Cultural and Biological Diversity in the “Long Emergency” of Arctic Warming Hannah H. Voorhees, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR In 2008, polar bears became the first species listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act due to climate change projections. Anticipating endangerment, but unable to intervene directly in its ultimate cause—greenhouse gas emissions—federal wildlife biologists and their Alaska Native conservation partners faced a novel set of questions....
Lindsay A. Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Set for Life: Registers of Responsibility in Canada’s Diamond Basin Lindsay A. Bell, Postdoctoral Scholar, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto, and Christopher Smeall Fellow, SAR This presentation tracks how industry training programs attempt to socialize aboriginal residents into specific resource temporalities and the multiple ways in which trainees embrace, reject, and reconfigure them in light of their own circumstances, histories, and desired futures....
Susan E. Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Placing Care: Embodying Architecture in Outpatient Hospital Care for Immigrant and Refugee Patients Susan E. Bell, Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bowdoin College, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR “Placing Care” draws on nine months of fieldwork to explore the impact of physical space, routines, regulations, and technologies on encounters between adult immigrant/refugee patients and caregivers in two outpatient clinics in one hospital in Maine....
Mindy Morgan Colloquium
Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anthropologists at Work: The Production and Reproduction of Anthropological Knowledge in Indians at Work, 1933–1945 Mindy Morgan, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Michigan State University, and William Y. and Nettie K. Adams Fellow, SAR “Anthropologists at Work” explores the ways in which anthropological expertise was produced in Indians at Work, a magazine published by the Office of Indian Affairs from 1933–1945.
Gretchen Wren Purser Colloquium
Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Broke and Brokered in the Day Labor Business Gretchen Wren Purser, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Maxwell School of Syracuse University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Day labor agencies—colloquially referred to as labor pools or body shops—exemplify several of the most consequential features of the neoliberal landscape of employment, including the spread of precarious work and the increased role of labor market intermediaries....
June 2013
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, June 26, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Stone Age Seafarers in the Greek Island Curtis Runnels, Professor, Department of Archaeology, Boston University, and Cotsen Fellow, SAR Our earliest ancestors evolved in Africa and subsequently colonized the Eurasian continent in successive waves, leading to the permanent presence of humans there about one million years ago. Archaeologists have assumed that these dispersals were by land through the Near East and that early humans could not or did not dare to cross large bodies of open water like the Mediterranean....
San Juan River, Mexican Hat, Utah Field Trip
Monday, June 3–Saturday, June 8, 2013 Archaeological Adventure on the San Juan River This 40-mile rafting adventure through the stunningly beautiful Upper Canyon of the San Juan River includes three nights and four days floating from Montezuma Creek to Mexican Hat, Utah.
May 2013
Storyboard image from ‟Mozhi Lizhini (Black Cat) in Space” Artist Talk
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Melissa Henry: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2013 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow Filmmaker Melissa Henry (Navajo) has been working on pre-production for her upcoming film Black Cat in Space (working title), a story about Captain Meow, his robot CuAl6 , and their starship Space Coyote, who travel across the galaxy to stop the vengeful Hiss, Devourer of Worlds.
Adrienne Keene Speaker Series
Thursday, May 23, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Admiration/Appropriation: Native Art Globalized Adrienne Keene, EdD candidate, Harvard University; blogger, Native Appropriations Fascination with Native cultures and aesthetics has become increasingly globalized over the last century. Most recently, appropriations of Navajo designs have prompted the tribal government to issue cease and desist letters to an American fashion-forward retailer. When does admiration cross the line into appropriation?
Lisa Hsu Barrera Colloquium
Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations Lisa Barrera and Melvin Sarracino, Anne Ray Interns, SAR “Connecting Collections to the Community: Best Practices and Recommendations for the California State Indian Museum’s Basketry Collection” by Lisa Barrera and “The Cultural Relevance of K’unee to K’awaika’a-mesch” by Melvin Sarracino
Sapawe Whistles Sparks
Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Instruments of Power: Musical Performance in Rituals of the Ancestral Puebloans of the American Southwest Emily Brown Using a multidisciplinary approach that includes musicology, archaeology, iconography, history, and ethnography to examine musical instruments from the Southwest, much has been learned about music, musicians, and the social and physical contexts of music prior to European contact.
Arroyo Hondo Field Trip
Friday, May 10, 2013, 8:30 am–12:00 pm The Intriguing Story of the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo Join Douglas Schwartz, president emeritus of the School for Advanced Research, on a field trip to the fourteenth-century pueblo of Arroyo Hondo.
Kelly McHugh Speaker Series
Thursday, May 9, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Museums’ Dilemma: Culturally Appropriate Conservation Kelly McHugh, Objects Conservator, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution Many indigenous communities have differing ideas about the concepts of preservation and conservation, which often contradict typical museum practices. How does one balance museological best practices with cultural worldviews?
Karen L. Kramer during a colloquium presentation Colloquium
Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free 21st Century Hunting and Gathering Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Brian F. Codding, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, and Karen L. Kramer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah In this talk, Codding and Kramer provide a brief review of hunter-gatherer studies, discuss results emerging from contemporary research and provide a preliminary framework aimed at understanding contemporary life in hunter-gatherer societies.
SAR Logo Field Trip
Friday, May 3–Monday, May 6, 2013 Hubbell Art Auction and Canyon de Chelly In addition to the day-long auction event at the Hubbell Trading Post, we will accompany National Park Service archaeologist Keith Lyons on a full-day jeep tour of Canyon del Muerto in Canyon de Chelly.
Margaret Wickens Pearce Colloquium
Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Surface Dialogues Margaret Pearce, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Kansas, and Anne Ray Fellow, SAR It is simpler to connect cultures with cartography when the stories can be told in vector: using points, lines, and words.
April 2013
Jim Enote Speaker Series
Thursday, April 25, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Consultations: Providing Interpretation and Guidance for Collections Jim Enote, Director, A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center
Leigh Kuwanwisiwma, Director, Hopi Cultural Preservation Office
Gary Roybal, Native American Liaison, Bandelier National Monument
Cynthia Chavez Lamar (Moderator), IARC Director, School for Advanced Research
Native community representatives often work with museums to improve collections records and bring information back to the tribe. How do tribal representatives determine what information can be shared with the public and at what level? Where is the line between what should be kept internal versus made public—even in limited amounts—for the sake of preservation?
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Literary Anthropology Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs Anand Pandian, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University, and Stuart McLean, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota Pandian and McLean will propose a closer and more sustained engagement with anthropology's literary dimensions as a means of highlighting the discipline's unique position among the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and creative arts, and as an important way of engaging wider audiences....
SAR Logo Field Trip
Friday, April 19–Sunday, April 21, 2013 Archaeology of the Ute Mountain Tribal Park Join us for a trip into the southern borderlands of Mesa Verde as we travel with Native American guides into the Ute Mountain Tribal Park.
Wodaabe Woman, c. 1997 Lecture
Thursday, April 18, 2013, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Case of the Recurring Wodaabe Corinne Kratz The Wodaabe people were little known outside their home region of the Sahel until the 1950s. Filmmakers ranging from Robert Gardner, Werner Herzog, and National Geographic turned their lenses on Wodaabe life, highlighting their elaborate attire and rich ceremonies, particularly the visually spectacular geerewol ceremony.
Maxine McBrinn Colloquium
Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Resistant Foragers: Foraging and Maize Cultivation in the Northern Rio Grande Maxine McBrinn, Curator of Archaeology, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture In much of the Southwest, people are thought to have been significantly invested in farming by CE 200 and earlier. However, there are areas within the region, such as the Jornada Mogollon and the Northern Rio Grande, where populations continued higher levels of mobility until much later....
The Song of Achilles Artist Talk
Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members, $10 for non-members Writers Reading/Reading Writers: Madeline Miller Excavating Achilles: Following Homer’s Hero Through the Ages Author Madeline Miller reads from her 2012 Orange Prize-winning novel, The Song of Achilles, and explores the stories that are at the heart of its creation.
Peter Chestnut Speaker Series
Thursday, April 11, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Tribal Archives: Ethics and the Right to Access Peter Chestnut, Attorney, Chestnut Law Offices, P.A., Albuquerque Attorney Peter Chestnut talks about various issues and concerns that have impacted tribal archives and how these institutions and communities have solved or negotiated through these issues.
Elise M. Edwards Colloquium
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Fukushima’s Victories and Victims: The Fateful Alliance of Japanese Soccer and Nuclear Power Elise Edwards, Associate Professor, Department of History and Anthropology, Butler University, and Luce Fellow, SAR This talk will explore the entwined relationships and mutually beneficial growth plans pursued by TEPCO and the Japan Football Association since the 1990s, against the backdrop of a longer twentieth-century history of corporate-sport relations in Japan, and in light of the popular media’s story of the women’s soccer team’s victory and its ability to “heal a nation.”
Plaza Rats Sparks
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free The Plazas of New Mexico Chris Wilson & Miguel Gandert Cultural historian Chris Wilson and renowned photographer Miguel Gandert will present their newest book Center Place: The Plazas of New Mexico.
SAR Logo Field Trip
Friday, April 5, 2013, 8:00 am–4:00 pm Pecos Pueblo at the Beginning Pecos Pueblo is one of the most historically significant sites in New Mexico. As the largest and easternmost of the Pueblo villages, by 1540 it was home to at least 2,000 inhabitants.
March 2013
Hand Pictograph, Galisteo Basin Symposium
Saturday, March 30, 2013, 12:30–5:00 pm The Galisteo Basin: Archaeology and History of a New Mexico Landscape In Memory of Dr. Linda Cordell The Museum of New Mexico’s Friends of Archaeology and the School for Advanced Research will co-sponsor a public symposium on the archaeology and history of the Galisteo Basin. The half-day event will feature talks by eight distinguished scholars who have researched this culturally rich valley.
Lara Evans Speaker Series
Thursday, March 28, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Is It Native American Art?: Authenticity and Self-determination Lara Evans, Art Historian, Art History Faculty, Institute of American Indian Arts In the summer of 2012, the Southwest Association for Indian Arts hosted a lecture series on the topics of quality and authenticity. Speaker Series consultant Lara Evans presents the outcomes of these discussions and addresses the questions of who gets to decide what is “authentic,” and how Native self-determination plays into these issues.
Alex Blanchette Colloquium
Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Runt, Or the Making and Unmaking of the American Meat Pig Alex Blanchette, PhD Candidate, University of Chicago and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Environmental Studies, Tufts University (starting in 2013), and Weatherhead Fellow, SAR Through an analysis of labor and human-animal relations in the farrowing node of a factory farm—the segment where the pigs are born—this presentation develops a way to think about the constellations of politics and value embedded in the standardized meat pig as a (unique) type of industrial being.
Water Canteen and Olla Field Trip
Saturday, March 23, 2013, 8:00 am–5:00 pm The Artistry of Acoma Pueblo SAR has received a special invitation to visit Acoma Pueblo and learn about its artistic history through the eyes of Acoma potter Franklin Peters and Haak’u Museum curator Melvin Sarracino.
Jessica Metcalfe, SWAIA Indian Market, 2012 Lecture
Thursday, March 21, 2013, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers
(No advanced reservations. Ticket sales begin at 5:30 pm and are available only at the door.)
Native American Fashion from the 1940s to the Present, and into the Future Jessica Metcalfe Since the 1940s, Native American fashion designers have used clothing as a way to continue age-old clothing practices, deconstruct stereotypes, and subvert the mainstream fashion industry. The artists seek to reclaim the label “Native American” in the fashion world and create new opportunities for Native artists.
Library of Celsus, Ephesus, Turkey Field Trip
Thursday, March 21–Saturday, March 30, 2013 Ancient Borderlands of Western Turkey Join SAR on an exclusive adventure into some of the most fascinating and significant regions of the ancient world—Ionia, Lydia, and Caria—now within the modern nation of Turkey. Guided by historian Dr. John Lee, we will explore the history, archaeology, art, and culture of this beautiful area, all while traveling in five-star comfort.
T. J. Ferguson Speaker Series
Thursday, March 14, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Archaeology in the Southwest: To Collect or Not? T.J. Ferguson, Archaeologist and Professor, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona
Don Whyte, Chief Ranger, Chaco Culture National Historical Park
Elysia Poon (Moderator), IARC program coordinator, School for Advanced Research
Did you know it is illegal to collect pottery sherds and stone tools from public lands? Noted Southwest archaeologist T.J. Ferguson and Chaco Culture National Historical Park Chief Ranger Don Whyte discuss how to navigate the legalities surrounding archaeology in the Southwest and whether or not there is a way to be a responsible collector.
Things Unseen: Specters of Colonialism, Visual Culture, and US Colonial Mentorship of Japan in 1860 Colloquium
Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Imprinted Ideas and Indigenous Futurisms: Thinking Beyond Hollywood’s Indians and Toward Visual Sovereignty via Imaginative Acts of Reclamation Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Lamon Fellow, SAR This presentation will further explain how what might seem like an unexpected turn in contemporary Native cultural production and filmmaking is actually the reclamation and articulation of “Indigenous Futurisms.”
Phillips Chapel Sparks
Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Farther Along, Recalling Memories: A History of Phillips Chapel and the Las Cruces African American Community Clarence Fielder Erected in 1911, the Phillips Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church has played an important role in the history of the African American population in Las Cruces, NM.
Tour Narratives of Race, Place, and History: Expanding the Borders of America’s Black Towns Colloquium
Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Whites in Black Towns: Redesigning Race Relations in the Twenty-first Century Karla Slocum, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and NEH Fellow, SAR This presentation will address debates about the small yet growing settlement of Whites in “All Black Towns,” as well as a variety of Black Town business ventures linking Whites and Blacks in collaboration, co-existence, or sometimes contestation.
February 2013
Ari Kelman Colloquium
Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Misplaced Massacre: Sand Creek in History and Memory Ari Kelman, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California, Davis Ari Kelman, a historian at UC Davis, will discuss the meaning and impact of the longstanding fight to shape and control memories of Sand Creek.
James F. Brooks Lecture
Thursday, February 21, 2013, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Cycles of Evangelism in the Southwest Borderlands James F. Brooks Four “big ideas” swept across the Southwest borderlands of North America in the thousand years that span the emergence of social complexity in the Ancestral Puebloan world and the consolidation of the Spanish colony of New Mexico.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Empires of Love: Race, Sexuality, and the European-Asian Encounter Carmen Nocentelli, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of New Mexico Drawing on a range of literary and archival sources, Nocentelli argues that Europe's expansion into South and Southeast Asia contributed to the development of Western racial discourse while also shaping European ideals of marriage, erotic reciprocity, and monogamous affection.
Casandra Lopez Artist Talk
Tuesday, February 19, 2013, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Casandra Lopez in Conversation with Evelina Zuni Lucero 2013 Indigenous Writer-in-Residence SAR Writer-in-Residence Casandra Lopez is of Cahuilla, Luiseno, Tongva, and Chicana descent. Hosted by noted writer Evelina Zuni Lucero (Isleta/San Juan Pueblo), this event will include a conversation between Lucero and Lopez followed by a reading of Lopez’s work.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Between Art and Artifact: Archaeological Replicas and Cultural Production in Oaxaca, Mexico Ronda Lynn Brulotte, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico Author and UNM anthropologist Ronda Brulotte will discuss her book Between Art and Artifact: Archaeological Replicas and Cultural Production in Oaxaca, Mexico (University of Texas Press 2012), which provides an ethnographic examination of the politics of heritage tourism and artisan production in southern Mexico.
Santa Fe River Sparks
Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Acequias, Trails, Land Grants, and Early Twentieth-Century Urban Expansion: Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on Southeast Santa Fe Stephen Post Stephen Post has spent more than twenty years researching the archaeological history of the Northern Rio Grande valley with emphasis on the Santa Fe area.
January 2013
Schooling Mothers: Gendered Memories and Reflections of the Self Colloquium
Wednesday, January 30, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Children’s Schooling and the Pathways of Mothering Fibian Kavulani Lukalo, Senior Lecturer, Department of Communication and Media Studies, School of Human Resource Development, Moi University, and Campbell Resident Scholar, SAR In this presentation, Lukalo discusses findings of a life history study on factors that affected the education of mothers living in rural Kenya.
From the Myth of Kings to the Math of Kings: Art, Science, and the Ancient Maya Lecture
Thursday, January 24, 2013, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers From the Myth of Kings to the Math of Kings: Art, Science, and the Ancient Maya William Saturno Dr. William Saturno explores the most recent finds and paints a picture of Maya society driven by royal figures who exploited art and science to establish and maintain their place as symbol and center of Maya urban life.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Finding the Calories: Family Economy, Crop Yields, and Population Increase from 250 CE to 800 CE in the Prehistoric Four Corners District David Stuart, Professor and Associate Provost Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico and Jenny Lund, Undergraduate Student, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico Stuart and Lund have completed a series of calculations to quantify the calories needed, acres of maize required, and costs of population increase for a family of eleven pit-house dwellers at about 250 CE.
December 2012
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Tour Narratives of Race, Place, and History: Expanding the Borders of America’s Black Towns Karla Slocum, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and NEH Fellow, SAR This presentation examines twenty-first century black town bus tour narratives, exploring how tour narrators present black towns against the grain.
Cow Skull on Ghost House Sparks
Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Working the Land: New Mexico Ranch and Farm Women Tell their Stories Sandra Schackel From driving tractors to laying irrigation pipe to running a guest ranch, agricultural women in New Mexico are active, resourceful, and determined ranchers and farmers. Despite the continuing decline of family farms into the twenty-first century, life working the land remains of paramount importance to these women.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, December 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Guided by Place Names: Field Methods for the Cartographic Expression of Indigenous Geographies Margaret Wickens Pearce, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Kansas, and Anne Ray Fellow, SAR This presentation introduces work to expand cartographic language for the expression of Indigenous geographies, from an overview of previous projects to present challenges to foster a cross-cultural cartographic dialogue on climate change experience and adaptation strategies in northern Tanzania.
Southwest Crossroads Map “Trails” Colloquium
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free How to Read a Map: Cartographic Language for Curious Creatives Margaret Wickens Pearce, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Kansas, and Anne Ray Fellow, SAR This workshop introduces the fundamentals of cartographic language for the curious mind. Like music, architecture, and dance, cartography is a kind of language with its own vocabulary, grammar, and genres. We’ll learn some basic building blocks and then use that knowledge to dismantle our preconceptions of what maps do, and to re-read some maps with new eyes.
November 2012
“Rainman” Artist Talk
Thursday, November 29, 2012, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Jonathan Loretto: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2012 Rollin and Mary Ella King Fellow Jonathan Loretto is from Walatowa (Jemez) and Cochiti and has been creating traditional pottery for the past thirty years. This last year, he switched from creating vessels to developing figurative forms. Most recently, he has been creating what he calls “storytelling bobbleheads,” which combine the figurative tradition of Cochiti Pueblo with the contemporary pop phenomenon of the bobblehead.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Life and Paradoxical Leadership of Archaeologist William S. Webb Douglas W. Schwartz, President Emeritus and Senior Scholar, SAR To initiate the Depression-motivated Tennessee Valley Authority archaeology program, one of the world’s largest archaeological projects ever undertaken, a strong leader of this vast enterprise was required.
The Cienega de Santa Fe, 1873 Sparks
Tuesday, November 13, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free The Cienega and the Hospital: How a Marsh Shaped Downtown Santa Fe Cordelia Snow Hundreds and hundreds of years ago, the Santa Fe River meandered across a wide flood plain as the river flowed west and south before it joined the Rio Grande above modern Cochiti Pueblo. At some point, one of several oxbows in the river’s channel was pinched off and formed a cienega, or marsh, at the base of the foothills on the north side of the river.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Advances and Questions on the Evolution of Childhood Advanced Seminar co-chairs Courtney L. Meehan, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington State University and Alyssa N. Crittenden, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California–San Diego Research into the evolution of childhood and the diversity of children’s experiences around the world has attracted attention in recent years, yet children remain peripheral in much of evolutionary, cultural, psychological, and archaeological research.
October 2012
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 31, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Gathering Dust: Producing Therapeutic Natures in Post-socialist Siberia Tatiana Chudakova, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This presentation traces the unruly assemblages of the “Buryat-Tibetan” pharmacon.
Cerro Pedernal Field Trip
Saturday, October 27, 2012, 8:00–5:00 pm, Trip is Full Tsi-p’in-owinge’ Pueblo One of the “jewels of the Southwest,” Tsi-p’in-owinge’ Pueblo is located on a small mesa in the Rio Chama valley.
Indian Pueblo Cultural Center Symposium
Thursday, October 25–Friday, October 26, 2012, Free Registration 2012 Pueblo Indian Studies Symposium Historian Joe Sando’s legacy will be honored by highlighting current research in the field of Pueblo Indian studies.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Schooling Mothers: Gendered Memories and Reflections of the Self Fibian Kuvalani Lukalo, Senior Lecturer, Department of Communication and Media Studies, School of Human Resource Development, Moi University, and Campbell Resident Scholar, SAR Focusing on an impoverished agricultural community in Bungoma District in Kenya, Fibian Lukalo’s research examines the relationship between mothering practices and the schooling of girls in poor rural communities....
Rebuilding New Orleans with Music Lecture
Thursday, October 18, 2012, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Rebuilding New Orleans with Music Nick Spitzer Dr. Nick Spitzer relates why New Orleans culture is largely viewed as the primary agent of the city’s new sense of hope and relatively strong economy.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Politics of Life and Livelihood on the American Factory Farm Alex Blanchette, PhD Candidate, University of Chicago and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Environmental Studies, Tufts University (Starting in 2013), and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Alex Blanchette’s research explores the idea of the factory in the American factory farm, tracking this vexed concept as it is enlivened within the workplaces of some of the world’s largest pork corporations.
Karen Fisher Artist Talk
Tuesday, October 16, 2012, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Writers Reading/Reading Writers: Karen Fisher The Literary Arts Program at SAR, funded by the Lannan Foundation, is pleased to host the fall “Writers Reading/Reading Writers” event, through which notable creative writers read from their own work and discuss selections from writers who have proven influential in their own creative process. In Karen Fisher’s case, historical sources provide this inspiration, including the life of one of SAR’s founding trustees, the anthropologist Alice Cunningham Fletcher.
Inside El Malpais Field Trip
Friday, October 12–Saturday, October 13, 2012, Trip is Full The Legendary Zuni-Acoma Trail The El Malpais National Monument is the best place in the lower fortyeight states to view young, Hawaiian-style volcanic deposits. The name “El Malpais” comes from early Spanish explorers and translates literally to “the bad country,” so-named because of the impenetrable nature of these lava flows.
Elise M. Edwards Colloquium
Wednesday, October 10, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Fin de Millennium Football in Japan: A Sport and an Age for “Individuals” Elise Edwards, Associate Professor, Department of History and Anthropology, Butler University, and Luce Resident Scholar, SAR This talk will focus on the ways that coaches, journalists, and professional players experienced, imagined, and inscribed soccer as the sport that most aptly replicated the dynamics of globalization and most effectively trained citizens and workers for a new world economy.
Daguerreotype of SAR Sparks
Tuesday, October 9, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Tasting New Mexico Cheryl & Bill Jamison Few aspects of life in New Mexico say as much about our cultural heritage as our food. We can directly trace our local cuisine to the corn and other crops first planted by the ancestors of the Pueblos, the frontier resourcefulness of Spanish colonists who brought livestock along with many fruits and vegetables, and the nineteenth-century introduction of new ingredients and ideas from the eastern US.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Journeys to Others and Lessons of Self: Carlos Castaneda, Indigenismo, and the Politics of a New Age Ageeth Sluis, Associate Professor, Departments of History and Anthropology, Butler University, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This study sheds light on how new conceptions of indigenous identity informed “New Age” tourism to Mexico.
September 2012
Pueblo del Arroyo Field Trip
Friday, September 28–Sunday, September 30, 2012, Trip is Full Moonrise over the Chaco World The Ancestral Puebloans of the American Southwest were one of many ancient cultures that followed the movement of the sun, stars, moon, and other heavenly bodies and aligned their dwellings to the sky, built monuments to celestial events, and depicted them artistically in rock art.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 26, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Things Unseen: Specters of Colonialism, Visual Culture, and US Colonial Mentorship of Japan in 1860 Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR. Dr. Medak-Saltzman will present a framework she terms “specters of colonialism" and use it to analyze two widely circulated woodblock prints from 1860: one made in Japan about the US, and the other made in the US about Japan.
Figures, c. 1795 Lecture
Thursday, September 20, 2012, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Humans—Are We the Exception? Jonathan Marks Dr. Jonathan Marks defends the surprisingly unpopular position that humans are different from other kinds of species and cannot readily be understood without taking humankind’s unique characteristics into consideration.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Beyond Snaketown: Property Rights and Corporate Group Formation in Hohokam Society Douglas B. Craig, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Northland Research, Inc. This presentation will provide a broad overview of Hohokam social organization and discuss new evidence for the emergence of large, land-holding corporate groups with inheritable property rights.
El Delirio Legacy Circle Lapel Pin Box Special Event
Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 4:00–6:00 pm El Delirio Legacy Circle Celebration Legacy gifts to SAR will help support the School for generations to come. To honor the vital support of current El Delirio Legacy Circle members, SAR will be presenting these generous individuals with a token of our deep appreciation.
Hopi Man, circa 1900 Field Trip
Friday, September 14–Monday, September 17, 2012, Trip is Full The Art and Culture of Hopi The trip will highlight the Hopi Pueblo culture of the past and present. Travel through the red and white sandstone cliffs of western New Mexico on Amtrak’s Southwest Chief for a three-night stay at one of the last great railroad hotels, La Posada in Winslow, AZ.
The Amazing Camera Obscura Special Event
Friday, September 14, 2012, 9:00 am–4:00 pm, Free A Rare Viewing at SAR: First-ever Camera Obscura in the Boardroom For the first time since it was built in the 1920s, the historic living room at El Delirio—the name given to the estate by its owners, Martha Root White and Amelia Elizabeth White, after their favorite bar in Spain—was transformed into a camera obscura. Coinciding with the recently installed photography exhibit Underscore Views, the rare viewing was likely one of the grandest camera obscuras ever seen in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 12, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Cross-Cultural Approaches to Apprenticing in Western North America Jeanne Arnold, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR The Island Chumash of California’s Channel Islands were engaged in North America’s most intensive shell-working crafts from the AD 1100s–1800s.
Daguerreotype of SAR Sparks
Tuesday, September 11, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Los Ciboleros: Spanish Buffalo Hunters Manuel Lopez Historical interpreter Manuel Lopez will discuss the history, hunting methods, and tales of the ciboleros, Spanish buffalo hunters of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in New Mexico.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2012–2013 Resident Fellows
August 2012
Water Jar, Acoma Pueblo, 1900–1925 Tour
Thursday, August 16–Friday, August 17, 2012, $20 per person Indian Market Tours IARC at SAR is offering special tours of its collection of Native American art before Indian Market weekend, August 16–17.
Herb Stevens Special Event
Friday, August 10, 2012, 6:00–8:00 pm, $150 per person, SAR Members Only Our Second Century—Walking into the Future SAR will hold an invitation-only Showcase Event for our members and their guests to unveil our banner exhibit highlighting Native moccasins of the Southwest, including those in the Indian Arts Research Center collection, and to introduce the moccasin makers involved in the exhibit’s development and the new documentary film, To Feel the Earth.
Double-sided Pueblo Sash Artist Talk
Thursday, August 9, 2012, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free, This Artist Talk is Full Louie García: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2012 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow While at SAR, Louie García intends to complete a 100% wool plaid blanket or manta woven in the traditional diamond and diagonal twill patterns, which are present on historic textiles.
Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann Colloquium
Wednesday, August 1, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Selling the Exotic to the Exotic: Islamic Talismans in Nineteenth-Century Asante, Ghana Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, and Cotsen Fellow, SAR During the nineteenth century, Islamic talismans traveled the camel caravan trade routes across sub-Saharan Africa, circulating widely amongst the non-Muslim Asante.
July 2012
Christopher Ball Colloquium
Wednesday, July 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Ritual Transformations: Healing, Development, and Culture Show in an Amazonian Society Christopher Ball, McKennan Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College, and Christopher Smeall Fellow, SAR This presentation addresses two abiding themes in cultural anthropology—the power of ritual to transform states of affairs in the social world, and changes in the meanings and functions of specific rituals under the effects of a globalized politics of identity.
Sharon N. DeWitte Colloquium
Wednesday, July 18, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Demographic Effects of Medieval Plague: Longevity and Health in Post-Black Death London Sharon N. DeWitte, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South Carolina, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Using data from medieval London cemeteries, this presentation investigates the demographic and health effects of the fourteenth-century Black Death, one of the most devastating epidemics in human history and one which targeted relatively frail people.
Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr. Colloquium
Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Red, Black, and Brown: Indian Schools and Black Educators after Brown v. Board of Education Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr., Ph.D. Candidate, Department of American Studies and African American Studies, Yale University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR In the wake of “massive resistance” to the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown decision, hundreds of African Americans migrated to Indian country to work as teachers in reservation schools.
Locust Tree in Bloom, Spring 2012 Colloquium
Thursday, July 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Bog and the Beast, The Engraver and the Priest: Museums, the Nation, and the World Peggy Levitt, Professor, Department of Sociology, Wellesley College, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Ever since the leaders of the new French Republic opened the doors of the Louvre to the French public, museums have strongly influenced how people imagine the nations where they live.
June 2012
Lawrence Rosen Colloquium
Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Romancing the Tribe: The History of an Anthropological Problem Lawrence Rosen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Princeton University, and William Y. and Nettie K. Adams Fellow, SAR The presentation will trace the history of the anthropological “romance of the tribe” not only for its impact on the discipline itself but how, as views of the tribe have changed, so have our views of humankind and the policies applied by Western nations in many parts of the world.
Nancy Owen Lewis Colloquium
Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Selling Health in New Mexico: Bringing the Sick to the Land of the Well Nancy Owen Lewis, SAR Scholar-in-Residence and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow During New Mexico’s struggle for statehood, territorial officials promoted its climate as ideal for curing tuberculosis, the leading cause of death in America. As proof, they cited the absence of disease among its native people. This presentation examines the factors that shaped the health seeker movement from 1880–1900—and its unintended consequences.
The Mandala Center Field Trip
Saturday, June 9–Sunday, June 10, 2012 Paleoindians and Prairie Schooners Two iconic landmarks of New Mexico are the Santa Fe Trail and the Folsom site, a renowned Paleoindian site dating between 10,800 and 10,200 years ago.
Mary Cabot Wheelwright Field Trip
Friday, June 8, 2012, 8:30–3:00 pm The Historic Los Luceros Hacienda The historic 140-acre Los Luceros property is one of the most beautifully restored nineteenth-century haciendas in northern New Mexico.
Pueblos of the Northern Galisteo Basin Field Trip
Saturday, June 2, 2012, 7:30–2:00 pm Pueblos of the Northern Galisteo Basin For three centuries, the Galisteo Basin was home to one of the largest concentrations of Puebloan communities in the Southwest.
May 2012
Access Artist Talk
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Maile Andrade: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2012 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow Maile Andrade’s work reflects and is rooted in a native Hawaiian worldview. She creates traditional and contemporary arts using a wide range of media to develop innovative new techniques, materials, and themes.
Nancy Marie Mithlo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Orality and the Native Image Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The repatriation of historic photographs to original source communities often elicits oral responses as memory and imagination are animated.
Rose Díaz Speaker Series
Thursday, May 17, 2012, 2:00–5:00 pm, Free Documenting Collections and Artists: Using Oral History Methods in the Preservation of Artist Legacies Rose T. Díaz Are you trying to create an oral history for works in your art collection or trying to document the works of a particular artist? This workshop will provide a process for documenting artist legacies using oral history methods.
Malena Mörling Colloquium
Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Poetry Reading Malena Mörling, Research Associate, SAR Malena Mörling is the author of two collection of poetry, Ocean Avenue and Astoria as well as several translations. She will read her poems as well as translations of the pioneering, Finnish-Swedish modernist, Edith Södergran.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations SAR Anne Ray Interns Kelsey Potdevin and Jennifer McCarty Gatekeepers and Traders in Alaska’s Northwest Interior 1800–1870 and Inupiat Ilitqusiat: Those Things that Make Us Who We Are
Llama Packing in Utah’s Spectacular  Grand Gulch Wilderness Field Trip
Tuesday, May 8–Sunday, May 13, 2012 Llama Packing in Utah’s Spectacular Grand Gulch Wilderness Grand Gulch is a spectacular geologic feature on Cedar Mesa in southeastern Utah, and was once home to Basketmaker and Ancestral Puebloan peoples.
Nancy Marie Mithlo Speaker Series
Thursday, May 3, 2012, 2:00–5:00 pm, Free Documenting Collections and Artists: Making the Artwork Come Alive Jared Chavez, Keevin Lewis, and Nancy Marie Mithlo Explore projects that have been undertaken to document and preserve the lives of artists and their work.
El Delirio Madonna Special Event
Wednesday, May 2, 2012, 2:00–3:30 pm, Free Planned Giving from Soup to Nuts A lighthearted afternoon tea and estate planning conversation (served with a hearty helping of humor).
Teresa McCarty Colloquium
Wednesday, May 2, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Genealogies of Language Loss and Recovery: A Closer Look at Language in the Lives of Native American Youth Teresa L. McCarty, AW Snell Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar This presentation takes a closer look at the ways in which explicit and implicit policies about language are constructed intergenerationally in contexts of linguistic and cultural oppression, and how those policies take shape in indigenous young people’s lives.
April 2012
Guaje Ruin Kiva in 2005 Field Trip
Friday, April 27, 2012, 8:00 am–5:00 pm Riding to Guaje: Northern Canyons of the Pajarito Plateau Archaeologist Edgar Lee Hewett and poet Peggy Pond Church are two people forever linked to the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico. US Forest Service archaeologists Mike Bremer and Anne Baldwin will be our expert guides on this backroad adventure.
Out of Many Lecture
Thursday, April 26, 2012, 6:30–7:30 pm, FREE for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers The First American Civil War: The Revolution Alan Taylor Pulitzer Prize winner Alan Taylor presents a colorful talk on the American Revolution, our first Civil War.
Aimee V. Garza Colloquium
Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Migration and the Politics of Religious Revivalism in New Mexico Aimee V. Garza, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR The Catholic Charismatic Renewal or renovación carismática is a religious revitalization movement that is sweeping northern Mexico, growing in popularity with Mexican migrants residing in the United States, and changing what it means to be Catholic on both sides of the border.
David Rettig and Bruce Bernstein during the “Case Studies” event Speaker Series
Thursday, April 19, 2012, 2:00–5:00 pm, Free Case Studies: Problems and Solutions in Artist Estates Margarete Bagshaw, Bruce Bernstein, Kate Fitz Gibbon, and David Rettig In this panel discussion, representatives of artist estates, such as those of Allan Houser, Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Harry Fonseca, will discuss the various challenges and benefits involved with managing these estates.
Téa Obreht Artist Talk
Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 5:30–7:00 pm, FREE for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Writers Reading/Reading Writers: Téa Obreht Performance by musical trio Rumelia starting at 5:00 pm The literary arts program at the School for Advanced Research, supported by the Lannan Foundation, is honored to host the spectacularly gifted young writer Téa Obreht in our “Writers Reading/Reading Writers” series.
Kate Fitz Gibbon during the “Case Studies” event Speaker Series
Thursday, April 12, 2012, 2:00–5:00 pm, Free Legal Issues: Artist Rights and Estate Planning Kate Fitz Gibbon This lecture addresses the legal issues that arise with artist legacies and rights, such as how to work with museums, estate planning, and tax issues. Attorney Kate Fitz Gibbon will touch on these issues and answer questions from the audience.
Llama Packing in Utah’s Spectacular  Grand Gulch Wilderness Field Trip
Wednesday, April 11–Monday, April 16, 2012 Llama Packing in Utah’s Spectacular Grand Gulch Wilderness Grand Gulch is a spectacular geologic feature on Cedar Mesa in southeastern Utah, and was once home to Basketmaker and Ancestral Puebloan peoples.
Margaret M. Bruchac Colloquium
Wednesday, April 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Keen Eyes: Recovering Bertha Parker's Lost Contributions to Indigenous Archaeology Margaret M. Bruchac, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR This research is excerpted from a book manuscript that critically examines and reconceptualizes relations among American anthropologists and indigenous informants.
Monks in Prayer Sparks
Tuesday, April 10, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free New Mexico Monks Brewing Beer: A Historical Tradition Berkeley Merchant and Brother Christian Leisy In the United States, the monastic brewing tradition is carried on only at the Monastery of Christ in the Desert, north of Abiquiu, New Mexico.
Craig R. Janes Colloquium
Wednesday, April 4, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mining Mongolia: Reflections on the “Resource Curse,” Poverty, and Applied Anthropology in the Asian El Dorado Craig R. Janes, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University and Henry Luce Foundation Resident Scholar, SAR Dr. Janes will reflect on the emergence and exacerbation of poverty and rural underdevelopment in the face of vast mineral wealth, and discuss efforts to address the social and health impacts of mining and related development activities.
March 2012
Nogales Cliff House Field Trip
Saturday, March 31, 2012, 7:30 am–5:00 pm Mystery of the Gallina People The obscure ancient culture known as the Gallina occupied a remote region of northwestern New Mexico around AD 1100. The culture suddenly vanished around 1275, as the last of its members either left or were “wiped out.”
SAR’s Facebook Speaker Series
Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 3:00–5:00 pm, Free It Takes a Village to Support an Artist: Funding Projects Using Social Media and the Internet Katharine DeShaw This lecture explores the recent trend of micro-philanthropy to support artists and their projects. Katharine DeShaw, United States Artists executive director, speaks about USA Projects.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Disturbing Bodies: The Politics and Practice of Forensic Exhumation Advanced Seminar co-chairs Zoë Crossland, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University; and Rosemary Joyce, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley What values and beliefs underlie the burgeoning practice of forensic exhumation—re-excavating human remains to address questions of justice?
Books Artist Talk
Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 5:00–6:00 pm, Free David Treuer to Launch New Book at SAR Celebrated Native novelist David Treuer has gained a reputation for writing fiction that expands the horizons of Native American literature. He will talk at SAR about his first full-length work of nonfiction.
Marla Allison Field Trip
Friday, March 23, 2012, 8:00 am–5:30 pm The World of Laguna Pueblo Laguna Pueblo is one of the largest Keresan pueblos in New Mexico and consists of the six small villages of Encinal, Laguna, Mesita, Paguate, Paraje, and Seama. The majestic white San José Mission sits atop the hill in the center of Laguna.
Base Bowl and Ollas Speaker Series
Thursday, March 15, 2012, 3:00–5:00 pm, Free Artist Fellowships and Residencies: Who, What, When, Where, Why? Jennifer Complo McNutt, Elysia Poon, Reuben Tomás Roqueñi, and John Torres-Nez This panel discussion focuses on artist fellowships and residencies, why they are important, what opportunities are available, and what is expected when applying. Representatives from the Indian Arts Research Center, Eiteljorg Museum, Southwest Association for Indian Arts, and Native Arts & Cultures Foundation participate.
Nicole Taylor Colloquium
Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Obesity and Body Image Concerns among High School Teens Nicole Taylor, Director, Scholar Programs, SAR Popular obesity discourses in the US have constructed a perceptual reality wherein it seems as though no one is safe from becoming fat.
Walpi Sparks
Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free In Search of Francisco Atanasio Dominguez & Silvestre Velez de Escalante Gregory MacGregor and Siegfried Halus The 1776 expedition of Francisco Atanasio Dominguez and Silvestre Velez de Escalante circumnavigated 1800 miles of unchartered territory never before seen by Europeans.
Frédérique Apffel-Marglin Colloquium
Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Subversive Spiritualties: How Rituals Enact the World Frédérique Apffel-Marglin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, Smith College Apffel-Marglin draws on Bohrian quantum physics and critical science studies, as well as empirical data from archaeology, geography, ethnobotany, and anthropology, to argue that there is no pre-given nature as the back-drop to human action.
Kapa Haka (Officer Tuamaha) Lecture
Thursday, March 1, 2012, 6:30–7:30 pm, FREE for SAR members • $10 for nonmembers Pride, Prejudice, and Power: Indigenous Arts Movements at Home and Abroad Nancy Marie Mithlo The display, circulation, and consumption of American Indian arts has radically changed with the advent of new technologies, enhanced mobility, and awakened political sensibilities.
February 2012
Doorway in Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon Colloquium
Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Chaco and Cahuachi: A Tale of Two Pilgrimage Centers John Kantner, Vice President for Academic & Institutional Advancement Comparative archaeological investigation of Chaco Canyon in the US Southwest and Cahuachi on the south coast of Peru is providing insights into how large pilgrimage centers develop.
Julie M. Weise Colloquium
Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Migration and its Discontents in the U.S. South Since 1960 Julie Weise, Assistant Professor, International Studies Program, California State University, Long Beach and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation discusses the Mexican agricultural workers who moved to rural Georgia in the 1960s–1980s, and goes on to explain Mexican migration to greater Charlotte, North Carolina since 1990.
John Martin Colloquium
Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Why More Boys than Girls—Or More Girls than Boys?: New Findings on Human Sex Ratio Variation at Birth John Martin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University and Visiting Research Associate; and Paul Wren, Senior Principle Engineer, Performance Software Corporation, Phoenix, AZ, and Co-Founder and Administrator of Open Anthropology Cooperative Why is the ratio of male to female births among women who do not live with other women of fertile age higher than it is with women who do?
San Augustin Church Sparks
Tuesday, February 14, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free San Augustin Church Illuminated Tom Windes Sitting on the north side of the Isleta Pueblo plaza, the massive, white structure of the San Augustin Church dominates the pueblo’s skyline.
Janice Gould’s Guitar in the King Residence at SAR Artist Talk
Monday, February 13, 2012, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free, This Artist Talk is Full Janice Gould in Conversation with Joy Harjo: Reading, Conversation, & Reception 2012 Indigenous Writer-in-Residence
Piltdown Committee Lecture
Thursday, February 9, 2012, 6:30–7:30 pm, FREE for SAR members • $10 for non-members The Fossil Chronicles: Revolutions in Paleoanthropology Dean Falk Dr. Dean Falk compares two momentous discoveries to illustrate the twists, turns, competition, and passions that have always characterized research on human origins.
Southwest Crossroads Map “Trails” Colloquium
Wednesday, February 8, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Coronado Expedition, Discoveries Since 1992 Richard and Shirley Flint, Research Associates, Archaeology Southwest NPS concluded that insufficient information existed about the route followed by the Coronado expedition. Subsequently, a major campsite of the Coronado expedition was located in Texas.
Aimee V. Garza Colloquium
Wednesday, February 1, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A State for Sanctuary: The Curious Life of a Controversial Proclamation Aimee V. Garza, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California Santa Cruz and SAR Visiting Research Associate This lecture uncovers the untold history of the Sanctuary Movement in New Mexico during the 1980s.
January 2012
President's Garden in Winter Colloquium
Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Federal Indian Service and Intertribal Identity at the Turn of the 20th Century Cathleen Cahill, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of New Mexico Cathleen Cahill will discuss her recently published book, Federal Fathers and Mothers: A Social History of the US Indian Service.
Wossen Argaw Tegegn Colloquium
Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Unpacking Gendered Institutional Norms: Who Holds the Mouse? Why? Wossen Argaw Tegegn, Research Scholar, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna, and Campbell Resident Scholar This presentation questions the often unquestioned norms whereby men control equipment such as the mouse in computer science labs, the theodolite in surveying technology field sessions, and the voltmeter in electrical engineering workshops.
Art in Our Lives Book Event
Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 6:00–7:30 pm, Free Art in Our Lives: Native Women Artists in Dialogue Readers’ Club at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum The artists participated in three seminars at SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center and covered topics such as home/place, transgression/boundaries, art as healing/art as struggle, pain/joy, art practice/work, and survival/colonization. Join us for a most interesting discussion of selections from this work.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Evolution of the Human Family Laura Fortunato, 2011 Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute This talk presents recent advances in the application of evolutionary thinking to the study of the human family, focusing on the evolution of marriage and inheritance strategies.
Sand River in Bloom Sparks
Tuesday, January 10, 2012, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Sand River in Bloom Beverley Spears Beverley Spears has walked a one-mile stretch of the Arroyo de los Chamisos for the past twenty years. She has noted and documented with charts and photographs the multitude of wildflowers there as well as considered the hydrology and conservation of this landscape.
December 2011
Kitty King Corbett Colloquium
Wednesday, December 14, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reframing Global Health in the Context of Environmental Crisis Kitty Corbett, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Human communities are facing unprecedented threats from natural resource depletion, extinctions, pollution, overpopulation, and climate change.
President William H. Taft signing the New Mexico Enabling Act, 1910 Sparks
Tuesday, December 13, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm New Mexico’s Stumble to Statehood Jon Hunner From corrupt politicians to bitter partisan battles, from an inopportune handshake to presidential prerogatives, New Mexico lurched to statehood through prejudice, racism, and national power struggles.
Nancy Marie Mithlo Colloquium
Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reading the Image: The Photography of Horace Poolaw in Context Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar Kiowa photographer Horace Poolaw (1906–1984) documented the vibrancy of the southern Plains communities near Anadarko, Oklahoma with a keen sense of place and people.
Arrowheads made of antler tines from an Early Copper Age settlement Lecture
Thursday, December 1, 2011, 6:30–7:30 pm, FREE for SAR members • $10 for non-members Revolutions: The Age of Metal and the Evolution of European Civilization William Parkinson The evolution of agricultural villages in Europe, from their beginning in the Neolithic through their fluorescence during the Bronze Age, is the subject of this illustrated lecture.
November 2011
Water Canteen and Olla Artist Talk
Monday, November 28, 2011, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Franklin Peters: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2011 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow Emerging artist Franklin Peters of Acoma Pueblo spent three months studying the collections at the Indian Arts Research Center to better understand the techniques and processes of his ancestors.
My Family’s Tennis Shoes Special Event
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 6:30–8:30 pm, Free Southwestern Research and Education Triangle A Gathering to Celebrate Achievements of the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, SMU; the School for Advanced Research; and SMU-in-Taos
Julie M. Weise Colloquium
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Corazón de Dixie: Migration and the Struggle for Rights in the U.S. South and Mexico, 1910–2010 Julie Weise, Assistant Professor, International Studies Program, California State University, Long Beach, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation chronicles the vibrant transnational world of Mexican migrants in the U.S.
New Mexico youth hanging National Youth Administration shop sign, ca. 1940 Sparks
Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free The New Deal in New Mexico Kathryn Flynn The Great Depression (1933–1943) left the United States in a state of crisis and New Mexico needed help just like the rest of the nation.
Nogales Cliff House Field Trip
Saturday, November 5, 2011, 7:30 am–5:00 pm Mystery of the Gallina People Canceled Due to Winter Weather The obscure ancient culture known as the Gallina occupied a remote region of northwestern New Mexico around A.D. 1100. The culture suddenly vanished around 1275, as the last of its members either left or were “wiped out.”
Craig R. Janes Colloquium
Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Perfect Storm: Climate Change and Liberal Economic Development in Mongolia Craig Janes, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, and Henry Luce Resident Scholar This presentation examines how Mongolia’s transition from Soviet-style socialism to an unregulated free-market economy has affected the productivity and sustainability of agriculture and livestock herding.
October 2011
Teresa L. McCarty Colloquium
Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Indigenous Youth and Language Survival Teresa L. McCarty, Snell Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar Research with Native American communities undergoing rapid heritage-language loss.
 Special Event
Thursday, October 20, 2011, 5:00–7:00 pm Membership Appreciation Event Event is Full Special event for members only
Wossen Argaw Tegegn Colloquium
Wednesday, October 19, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Fire on the Foot: A Case of Gender-Based Violence in a University Setting Wossen Argaw Tegegn, Research Scholar, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna, and Campbell Resident Scholar This presentation demonstrates how the culture of gender-based violence in a university setting is a function of the gendered power dynamics observed in the wider patriarchal society.
Robert Tenorio Pottery Field Trip
Saturday, October 15, 2011, 9:00 am–3:00 pm Santo Domingo Pueblo Pottery Demonstration with Robert Tenorio Pottery Demonstration and Firing at Santo Domingo Pueblo Robert Tenorio will demonstrate each step as he makes a pot, while allowing participants to try out their own artistic skills by painting a small piece with a yucca-fiber paintbrush.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Biosecurity and Vulnerability Advanced Seminar co-chairs Lesley A. Sharp, Ann Whitney Olin Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, and Senior Research Scientist in Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; and Nancy N. Chen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz This presentation addresses the perilous embodied consequences associated with a recent proliferation in global security measures.
Alan Heathcock Artist Talk
Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 5:30–7:00 pm, Free Writers Reading/Reading Writers: Alan Heathcock The Literary Arts Program at SAR, funded by the Lannan Foundation, is pleased to host the Fall “Writers Reading/Reading Writers” event, through which notable creative writers read from their own work, as well as discuss selections from writers who have been most influential in their own careers, in Heathcock’s case, Santa Fe novelist Cormac McCarthy.
Recognizing Authentic Handmade Native American Art Sparks
Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Recognizing Authentic Handmade Native American Art Tony Eriacho, Jr. What is the difference between handmade and handcrafted Native art?
Robert Tenorio Pottery Field Trip
Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 10:00–11:00 am Santo Domingo Pueblo Pottery Demonstration with Robert Tenorio Preview of Santo Domingo Pottery with Robert Tenorio at IARC Robert Tenorio will meet with participants in the Indian Arts Research Center to share his knowledge of Pueblo pottery.
Revolutionary mural in downtown Cairo, March 2011 Lecture
Thursday, October 6, 2011, 6:30–7:30 pm, FREE for SAR members • $10 for non-members Creativity and Revolution: Egypt at a Crossroads Jessica Winegar Dr. Winegar presents a look at the creative expressions of a revolution that shook the world.
Margaret M. Bruchac Colloquium
Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Consorting with Savages: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists Margaret M. Bruchac, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar A series of case studies serve to illustrate how Native gatekeepers assisted and resisted the exchange of knowledge.
Warrior Petroglyph at Astialakwa Field Trip
Saturday, October 1–Sunday, October 2, 2011 Archaeology of the Jemez Pueblo Revolt Overnight in Jemez Springs During this two-day hiking adventure, we will visit three of the Jemez refuge pueblos constructed in the immediate aftermath of the 1680 Pueblo Revolt...
September 2011
A Tale of Two Traders: Bill Beaver and Mark Winter Colloquium
Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm A Tale of Two Traders: Bill Beaver and Mark Winter Susan Brown McGreevy, Humanities Scholar, Utah Museum of Natural History, and IARC Research Associate While many trading posts within the Navajo Nation have closed their doors, the stories of Beaver and Winter revisit the relationships between trader and artist within a framework of collecting, documenting, and artistic development.
Hemi Rau Colloquium
Wednesday, September 21, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Māori Learners Enjoying Success as Māori in Māori/English Language Programs Cath Rau, Hemi Rau, Paul Royal, Eleanor Eketone, Moana Salu, Robyn Hata-Gage, and Pihere Levi; New Zealand (Aotearoa) Practitioners working in two long-established heritage language programs in New Zealand will discuss the programs in their respective schools and share examples of Māori students enjoying success as Māori.
Petroglyphs at Pueblo Blanco Field Trip
Friday, September 16, 2011, 8:00 am–2:30 pm Protecting Pueblo Blanco Pueblo Blanco was one of the basin’s largest and most densely populated sites with approximately 1,450 rooms, encompassing several plazas and kivas within a 20-acre area...
Linda C. Garro Colloquium
Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Health as a Family Matter: Health and Well-Being as Enacted in Dual-Earner Middle-Class Family Life in Los Angeles Linda C. Garro, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Most US health research relies on individuals as the unit of analysis.
Modern view of the power plant at Service Basin Sparks
Tuesday, September 13, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm Water Flows Uphill Toward Money: How the Santa Fe River Became Privatized Alan “Mac” Watson The Santa Fe River was a community-owned resource during the Spanish Colonial and Mexican periods, but became a privately owned commodity in 1880.
The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented Book Event
Sunday, September 11, 2011, 2:00–4:00 pm The Santa Fe Fiesta, Reinvented FREE Discussion and Book Signing with Sarah Bronwen Horton
Spruce Tree House, Mesa Verde, 2006 Field Trip
Friday, September 9–Sunday, September 11, 2011 Behind the Scenes at Mesa Verde: Wetherill Mesa Overnight in Mesa Verde National Park Our trip to Wetherill Mesa is more than just a visit to another cliff dwelling. It offers archaeological viewing in near solitude and with an expert guide with life-long experiences working in National Parks that protect Ancestral Puebloan and Basketmaker cultures.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, September 7, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations by the 2011–2012 SAR Resident Fellows
August 2011
Petroglyphs at Pueblo Blanco Field Trip
Saturday, August 27, 2011, 8:00 am–2:30 pm Protecting Pueblo Blanco Pueblo Blanco was one of the basin’s largest and most densely populated sites with approximately 1,450 rooms, encompassing several plazas and kivas within a 20-acre area...
Jeffrey Gibson Special Event
Friday, August 19, 2011, 4:30–7:00 pm Special Indian Market Event for SAR Friends:
Reception and Dialogue with Jeffrey Gibson
This talk investigates the influences of Native arts and culture on Jeffrey Gibson at the opening of his exhibition, Trade.
Ceramic Jars Tour
Thursday, August 18–Friday, August 19, 2011 Indian Market Tours Indian Arts Research Center IARC at SAR is offering special tours of its collection of Native American art before Indian Market weekend, August 18–19.
Brent Michael Davids Artist Talk
Thursday, August 11, 2011, 5:30–7:00 pm Brent Michael Davids: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2011 Ronald and Susan Dubin Fellow Davids is a world-renowned Mohican composer based in Saint Paul, Minnesota. He has won numerous awards including being named one of the top twenty-nine preeminent American Choral composers by the NEA for its national celebration, American Masterpiece...
Joan Jensen Colloquium
Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Historiography and Anthropology: The Case of Frances Densmore Joan M. Jensen, Professor Emerita, Department of History, New Mexico State University, and Adams Summer Scholar This presentation sheds new light on the work of anthropologist Frances Densmore.
July 2011
Puye Cliff Dwellings Field Trip
Saturday, July 30, 2011, 8:00 am–5:00 pm Riding to Guaje: Northern Canyons of the Pajarito Plateau Trip Cancelled Due to Fires Archaeologist Edgar Lee Hewett and poet Peggy Pond Church are two people forever linked to the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico. US Forest Service archaeologists Mike Bremer and Anne Baldwin will be our expert guides on this backroad adventure.
Ufuk Serin Colloquium
Wednesday, July 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late Antique and Byzantine Monuments and the Topography of Southern Caria in the Light of New Archaeological Evidence Ufuk Serin, Guest Scholar, Department of Architecture, Middle East University, Turkey, and Cotsen Summer Scholar This presentation examines the archaeology, history, and art history of Late Antique and Byzantine monuments in Southern Caria, Turkey.
Sascha Scott Colloquium
Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Awa Tsireh’s Paintings of Koshare and the Politics of Preservation Sascha Scott, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Music Histories, Syracuse University, and Bunting Summer Scholar Analysis of the paintings by Awa Tsireh of San Ildefonso illuminates the Pueblos’ role in the political and cultural debates of the 1920s.
Cochiti Pueblo Field Trip
Saturday, July 16, 2011, 7:30 am–5:00 pm A Tour of Hanat Kotyiti and Kuapa Pueblos Trip Cancelled Due to Fires Today, the Keres-speaking villages of Cochiti Pueblo and San Felipe Pueblo lie along the banks of the Rio Grande. Prior to Spanish contact, however, the Cochiti and San Felipe people lived together in the ancestral village of Kuapa.
Edmundo Cruz Luna Colloquium
Wednesday, July 13, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Complexities of Negotiating Cultural and Linguistic Identities Online—in Balinese Edmundo Cruz Luna, Instructor, Department of English Education, Mokpo National University, South Korea, and Smeall Summer Scholar This presentation addresses how native Balinese speakers develop and present their cultural and linguistic identities in online forums.
Jennifer Shannon Colloquium
Wednesday, July 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Writing an Ethnography of “Our Lives”: Collaborative Exhibit Making at the National Museum of the American Indian Jennifer Shannon, Assistant Professor and Curator, Department of Anthropology and Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Bunting Summer Scholar The predicaments and rewards resulting from the commitment by the National Museum of the American Indian to collaborate with Native peoples.
June 2011
Joanna Brooks Colloquium
Wednesday, June 29, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Why We Left: A Literary Archaeology of Anglo-American Colonialism Joanna Brooks, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of English and Comparative Literature, San Diego State University, and Bunting Summer Scholar During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, thousands of peasants left England for North America.
Diné (Navajo) Bracelet Sparks
Tuesday, June 7, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Collectible Southwestern Native American Jewelry Joe & Cindy Tanner How do you purchase collectible Southwestern Native American jewelry and insure that you are making a good investment?
SAR Logo Field Trip
Friday, June 3, 2011, 8:00 am–5:00 pm Following the Fiber Trail Trip is Sold Out The fiber arts of New Mexico encompass both the Hispanic and Native American traditions and are especially important for women, helping them to develop a sustainable future for their families.
May 2011
Artist Linda Aguilar Artist Talk
Thursday, May 26, 2011, 5:30–7:00 pm Linda Aguilar: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2011 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Fellow There is a stigma that basketmakers face: “Traditional” or “Non-Traditional.” Linda’s response: “I am both.” She works mostly with horsehair and waxed thread, non-traditional materials, but approaches the weaving in a very traditional manner.
Arroyo Hondo Lecture
Thursday, May 19, 2011, 6:30–7:30 pm The Big Pueblo at Arroyo Hondo and the Intriguing Stories It Tells Douglas W. Schwartz (School for Advanced Research) Around A.D. 1300, a great new pueblo of 1,000 rooms emerged at Arroyo Hondo, just south of what is now Santa Fe.
Catherine M. Cameron Colloquium
Wednesday, May 18, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Captives: Invisible Agents of Culture Change Catherine M. Cameron, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation explores the role of captives in captor society, how they affected captor social boundaries, and their potential impact on culture change.
Spruce Tree House, Mesa Verde, 2006 Field Trip
Friday, May 13–Sunday, May 15, 2011 Behind the Scenes at Mesa Verde: Wetherill Mesa Trip is Sold Out Overnight in Mesa Verde National Park Our trip to Wetherill Mesa is more than just a visit to another cliff dwelling. It offers archaeological viewing in near solitude and with an expert guide with life-long experiences working in National Parks that protect Ancestral Puebloan and Basketmaker cultures.
Melissa K. Nelson Colloquium
Wednesday, May 11, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Indigenous Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Persistence in Place Melissa K. Nelson, Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar This presentation explores the philosophies, methods, and practices of Indigenous science as articulated by Native scholars, leaders, and traditional practitioners.
Kit Carson Sparks
Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Compadres: Kit Carson and Lucien Maxwell Steve Zimmer Mountain men Lucien Maxwell and Kit Carson became fast friends when the two served under Capt. John C. Fremont in his 1842 expedition to the Rocky Mountains.
Doug Kiel Colloquium
Wednesday, May 4, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Rethinking the Urban/Reservation Relationship in American Indian History Doug Kiel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar A growing body of scholarly literature has examined urban Indian experiences and 20th century reservation histories, but little attention has been devoted to the connections between urban and reservation communities.
April 2011
Teresa Montoya Colloquium
Wednesday, April 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Woven Kin: Exploring Representation and Collaboration in Navajo Weaving Teresa Montoya (Diné), M.A. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Denver, and Anne Ray Native Intern This presentation explores the relationship between representational strategies and the employment of critical indigenous methodologies in the display of Navajo weavings in both Native and non-Native museums.
Sarah K. Croucher Colloquium
Wednesday, April 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Capitalism and Cloves: A Critique of Historical Archaeology Sarah K. Croucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wesleyan University, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar Working on historical archaeology in Eastern Africa raises questions as to how the narrative of Islamic plantations might be written into a global historical archaeology. This talk addresses the potential for changing taken-for-granted narratives in this field by writing Zanzibar back in to the archaeology of the modern world.
Archaic and Historic Rock Art in the Rio Grande Gorge Field Trip
Saturday, April 16, 2011, 8:30 am–2:00 pm Mesa Prieta Petroglyphs Trip is Sold Out Mesa Prieta is a basalt escarpment located on the west side of the Rio Grande north of Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo). Evidence of historic and prehistoric occupation of this area goes back over 9,000 years.
Site tour of Homolovi IV – Virtual Reality Cave Environment Lecture
Thursday, April 14, 2011, 6:30–7:30 pm Archaeological Virtual Reality: Building the True Digital Museum Doug Gann (Center for Desert Archaeology) Doug Gann takes a critical look at the evolution of virtual archaeology, examining the techniques used to virtually share archaeological research with the public.
Bettina Raphael Speaker Series
Thursday, April 14, 2011, 12:30–3:00 pm Lecture and Mini-workshop: Preserving Three-Dimensional Native Works Bettina Raphael, Conservator in Private Practice An artifact conservator for museums and private collector for the past 30 years, Bettina Raphael will focus on the importance of preventive care of three-dimensional objects and low-cost storage solutions.
SAR and Lannan Partnership Logo Artist Talk
Tuesday, April 12, 2011, 5:30–7:30 pm Writers Reading/Reading Writers: Malena Mörling & Tomas Tranströmer Lannan Literary Fellowship recipient and SAR Research Associate Malena Mörling (UNC Wilmington) will read from her translations of the Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer, one of the most significant European contemporary poets. She will also read her own poems and discuss the tremendous influence of Tranströmer’s work on her own.
Mimbres Bowl Sparks
Tuesday, April 12, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free A History of the Ancient Southwest Steve Lekson The history of the ancient Southwest played out on a continent rife with states and empires, commerce and conquest. Southwestern societies were neither ignorant nor immune to their world.
The 9/11 Generation: Young Muslims in the New World Order Colloquium
Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm The 9/11 Generation: Young Muslims in the New World Order Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Adeline Masquelier, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, and Benjamin F. Soares, Senior Research Fellow, African Studies Center, Leiden The traumatic events of September 11, 2001 have shaped the consciousness of a new global generation. What it means to be young and Muslim has changed. Coming of age in a Muslim majority society or as a Muslim minority in America and Europe is described by the co-chairs of this SAR seminar.
March 2011
Apache Rock Art Field Trip
Friday, March 25–Sunday, March 27, 2011 Hembrillo: An Apache Battlefield of the Victorio War Trip is Sold Out Overnight in Las Cruces The battle of Hembrillo was the largest confrontation of the Victorio War of 1879, pitting approximately 150 Warm Springs and Mescalero Apache against 300 U.S. Army troops including Buffalo Soldiers and White Mountain Apache Scouts.
Gloria Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Voyageur Re-presentations and Complications: Frances Anne Hopkins and the Métis Nation of Ontario Gloria Bell (Métis), M.A. in Art History, Carleton University, and Anne Ray Native Intern People of Native (Cree, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee) and European (English, French, Irish, Scottish) descent, métis, were employed as voyageurs in the fur-trade since the early eighteenth century in the Great Lakes area, yet their voices are absent in the historical records and their bodies and lifestyle are often represented as “other.”
Jim Enote Speaker Series
Thursday, March 17, 2011, 12:30–2:00 pm Lecture: Creating Collaborative Catalogs Jim Enote, Director, A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center Thousands of items removed from Zuni Pueblo have found their way into private and public collections, yet very few Zuni people know what they may be, where they are, and what they look like.
Street Economies, Politics, and Social Movements in the Urban Global South Colloquium
Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Street Economies, Politics, and Social Movements in the Urban Global South Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Walter E. Little, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Albany, State University of New York; Karen Tranberg Hansen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University; and B. Lynne Milgram, Professor of Anthropology, Faculty of Liberal Studies, Ontario College of Art and Design
2009–2010 Membership Lectures—The Visual & the Virtual: Rendering Humanity Visible Lecture
Thursday, March 10, 2011, 6:30–7:30 pm Breaking New Cinematic Ground: Aboriginal Canadian Experimental Videos Kristin Dowell (University of Oklahoma) Dr. Kristin Dowell presents a multimedia look at experimental video production among Aboriginal media artists whose unconventional approach is redefining Canadian media practice.
Brujerias: Stories of Witchcraft and the Supernatural in the American Southwest and Beyond Sparks
Tuesday, March 8, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free The World of Magic and the Supernatural Among Hispanics Nasario García Dr. García is the author of numerous books that deal with the culture and folklore of New Mexico, among them Brujerías: Stories of Witchcraft and the Supernatural in the American Southwest and Beyond.
Resident Scholar Dean Falk Colloquium
Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Evolution and Asperger’s Syndrome: Is There a Connection? Dean Falk, SAR Senior Scholar and Hale G. Professor, Department of Anthropology, Florida State University
February 2011
NAGPRA Speaker Series
Thursday, February 24, 2011, 12:30–2:00 pm Panel Discussion: NAGPRA’s Newest Rule—43 CFR 10.11 Bambi Kraus, Director, National Association of Tribal Historic Preservation
Peter Pino, Tribal Administrator, Zia Pueblo
Gary Roybal, Native American Liaison, Bandelier National Monument
On March 5, 2010, NAGPRA Final Rule 43 CFR 10.11 – Disposition of Culturally Unidentifiable Native American Human Remains, was passed by Congress.
Jamila Bargach Colloquium
Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Unwed Mothers in Morocco: Between Social Damnation and (Possible) Legal Redemption Jamila Bargach, Academic Director, Foundation SiHmad Derhem for the Development of the South and the Sahara, and Campbell Resident Scholar
Santee Frazier Artist Talk
Thursday, February 17, 2011, 5:30–7:00 pm Santee Frazier: Presentation and Discussion 2011 Indigenous Writer-in-Residence
“Hano Pueblo, Hopi, Arizona, ca. 1890” Colloquium
Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Ethnogenesis and Human Diversity: The Tewa Case Scott G. Ortman, Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute, and Lightfoot Fellow, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center
La Cieneguilla Petroglyphs Sparks
Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free A Very Special Place: The Geography and Archaeology of Santa Fe Jason Shapiro Santa Fe is one of those unique places in which a constellation of physical factors have enabled people to live and prosper for literally thousands of years.
Comic Books for Big Girls: Uchida Shungiku and the Realm of the Dollhouse Colloquium
Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Comic Books for Big Girls: Uchida Shungiku and the Realm of the Dollhouse Eve Zimmerman, Associate Professor of Japanese, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Wellesley College
January 2011
Jessica Rheann Metcalfe Colloquium
Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Native Designers of High Fashion: Expressing Identity, Creativity, and Tradition in Contemporary Clothing Design Jessica R. Metcalfe, Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Office for Equity and Inclusion, Department of Anthropology and Native Studies, University of New Mexico
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late to Terminal Classic Ritual Transitions at the Ancient Maya City of El Perú-Waká, Petén, Guatemala: A View from Structure M13-1 Olivia C. Navarro-Farr, Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Office for Equity and Inclusion, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico
December 2010
Lucas Bessire Colloquium
Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Culture Against Life: Bodily Affliction, Transnational Governance, and the Limits of the Human in the Gran Chaco Lucas Bessire, Postdoctoral Fellow, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowship Program, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Spiderweb Trail Sparks
Tuesday, December 14, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Albert Fountain and the Spiderweb Trail Karl Laumbach On February 1, 1896, Albert Jennings Fountain, prominent attorney and politician, and his 8-year-old son were run off the road between White Sands and Las Cruces, presumably murdered.
Melissa K. Nelson Colloquium
Wednesday, December 8, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Still Singing: The Eco-Cultural Revitalization of the Southern Paiute Salt Song Trail Melissa K. Nelson, Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
Sarah K. Croucher Colloquium
Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Making Local Identities: Ceramic Production in 19th-Century Eastern Africa Sarah K. Croucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wesleyan University, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
November 2010
Diane Bird Speaker Series
Thursday, November 18, 2010, 12:30–3:30 pm Lecture and Mini-workshop: Archival Records and Document Management Diane Bird, Archivist, Museum of Indian Arts & Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology Archivist Diane Bird will focus on several topics relating to creating and maintaining archives during this hands-on interactive workshop.
Aric Chopito Artist Talk
Thursday, November 11, 2010, 5:30–6:30 pm Aric Chopito: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2010 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow Aric Chopito is one of the few weavers practicing at Zuni Pueblo today. While at the Indian Arts Research Center (IARC), Aric plans to create a kilt using a semi-brocade technique.
Catherine M. Cameron Colloquium
Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Captives and the Creation of Power Catherine M. Cameron, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Hindi Sparks
Tuesday, November 9, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Los Arabes de Nuevo México Monika Ghattas Beginning in the late 1880s, Syrian-Lebanese immigrants began arriving in the New Mexico territory, looking for economic opportunities.
Sierra Leone Lecture
Thursday, November 4, 2010, 6:30–7:30 pm Africa’s Diamond Mines and the Contradictions of Visual Anthropology Daniel Hoffman (University of Washington) For Dr. Daniel Hoffman, the anthropologist with a camera, the diamond mines of West Africa present definite contradictions.
Doug Kiel Colloquium
Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Dreams Deferred: Competing Visions for Social Change on the Oneida Reservation Doug Kiel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
October 2010
Stephen H. Lekson Colloquium
Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Scalar Thresholds in the Ancient Southwest: Density and Distance Stephen H. Lekson, Curator and Professor, Museum of Natural History and Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Visiting Research Associate
Abstract Landscapes and Social Visions: Reading Southwestern Photobooks Colloquium
Wednesday, October 20, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Abstract Landscapes and Social Visions: Reading Southwestern Photobooks Audrey Goodman, Associate Professor of English, Georgia State University
Dale Kronkright Speaker Series
Thursday, October 14, 2010, 12:30–3:30 pm Lecture and Mini-workshop: Conserving Two-Dimensional Native Collections Dale Kronkright, Head of Conservation, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum An expert in conservation, Dale Kronkright will focus on conserving two-dimensional works on a budget.
Jamila Bargach Colloquium
Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Harvesting Fog: Introducing a Multi-faceted Problem Jamila Bargach, Academic Director, Foundation SiHmad Derhem for the Development of the South and the Sahara, and Campbell Resident Scholar
Native America Calling Sparks
Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Native America Calling Harlan McKosato Native America Calling is the nation's first and only electronic talking circle. Mr. McKosato's talk will allow participants to engage in a conversation about Native issues.
El Morro Field Trip
Friday, October 8–Saturday, October 9, 2010 El Morro and Zuni Pueblo This Trip is Sold Out Guided by Dr. Jim Kendrick and Randy and Milford Nahohai, with an overnight in Zuni Pueblo
Detail of The Mapa de Cuahtinchan No. 2 Lecture
Thursday, October 7, 2010, 6:30–7:30 pm Cave, City, and Eagles Nest: Rediscovered Mexican Codex Davíd Carrasco (Harvard University) Dr. Davíd Carrasco, historian of religions, presents an illustrated lecture on a recently recovered early 16th-century Mexican Codex.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 6, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm A Drummer Listens to the World Nii Otoo Annan, Percussion Master, Ghana, and Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, University of New Mexico
September 2010
Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic Collections Colloquium
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic Collections Advanced seminar chairs Sarah Byrne, University of London; Annie Clarke, University of Sydney; Rodney Harrison, Open University; and Robin Torrence, Australian Museum Museum collections are established through a complex series of interactions in which indigenous peoples play a key role. The preliminary results of current research are discussed.
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, September 22, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Pilgrims Drawn to Sacred Power: Santiago de Compostela Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar, SAR Who and why are pilgrims and what occurs during their journeys? After a general introduction, a detailed look follows at one major pilgrimage that has continued for a thousand years to Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain.
Katsina, Comanche Gap Field Trip
Friday, September 17, 2010, 9:00 am–2:30 pm Spectacular Comanche Gap This Trip is Sold Out Guided by Dr. Polly Schaafsma
Ernestine S. Elster Colloquium
Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Scaloria Cave: Found, Lost and Found Again Ernestine Elster, Research Associate, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Neolithic underground ritual is examined in this presentation on Scaloria Cave in Italy, a site discovered in the 1930s, but subsequently lost and found. The relationship between the cave and the Neolithic villages on the Tavoliere Plain is discussed.
Fiesta Theater 1926 Sparks
Tuesday, September 14, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free Pageants and Parades: The Battle for Fiesta Nancy Owen Lewis In 1919, the Santa Fe Fiesta began a major transformation under the leadership of Edgar Lee Hewett, director of SAR and the Museum of New Mexico.
2010–2011 Resident Scholars Colloquium
Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations by 2010–2011 SAR Resident Fellows
August 2010
Santa Fe Black-on-white bowl Tour
Thursday, August 19–Friday, August 20, 2010 Indian Market Tours Indian Arts Research Center IARC at SAR is offering special tours of its collection of Native American art before Indian Market weekend, August 19–20.
IARC Vault 2 Special Event
Friday, August 13–Sunday, August 15, 2010 Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art Over three magical days in Santa Fe, explore SAR's multi-dimensional relationships with Native American art, artists, and communities.
Daniel of Banana Water, Freetown, Sierra Leone Exhibit
Thursday, August 12–Friday, October 1, 2010 Freetown, Sierra Leone Photography by Julie Graber Photojournalists say that the most compelling pictures are of ordinary people doing extraordinary things, or extraordinary people doing ordinary things. Julie Graber’s 2003 images from Freetown, Sierra Leone do both.
View of the Ortiz Mountains from Petroglyph Hill Field Trip
Saturday, August 7, 2010, 8:00 am–2:00 pm The Mystery of Burnt Corn Pueblo and Petroglyph Hill This Trip is Sold Out Guided by Dr. James Snead
Artist Duane Slick Shadow Tracing a Warrior Mouse Carved Figure Artist Talk
Thursday, August 5, 2010, 5:30–7:30 pm Duane Slick: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2010 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow Duane Slick is a multi-media artist working in painting, printmaking, sculpture, books, lectures, and story-telling performances...
Zoë Wool Colloquium
Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Vital Signs and Möbius Time: Frayed Ordinaries at Walter Reed Zoë H. Wool, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto and Bunting Summer Scholar
July 2010
Poornima Paidipaty Colloquium
Wednesday, July 28, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Making Space/Making Race: Tribal Anthropology and the Colonial Frontier in 19th Century British India Poornima L. Paidipaty, Collegiate Assistant Professor and Harper-Schmidt Fellow, Society of Fellows, University of Chicago, and Adams Summer Scholar
In the Places of the Spirits Book Event
Sunday, July 25, 2010, 3:00–5:00 pm Talk and Book Signing for In The Places of The Spirits David Grant Noble SAR Press is pleased to announce the publication of a stunning new book by renowned photographer and writer David Grant Noble.
Gaussoin Metalsmithing Field Trip
Friday, July 23, 2010, 8:45 am–2:45 pm Native Artists Studio Tour Guided by the Gaussoin family, Randy Chitto, and Mateo Romero
In the Places of the Spirits Book Event
Thursday, July 22, 2010, 6:00–8:00 pm Talk and Book Signing for In The Places of The Spirits David Grant Noble SAR Press is pleased to announce the publication of a stunning new book by renowned photographer and writer David Grant Noble.
Jason Pribilsky Colloquium
Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Culture’s Laboratory: Scientific Imagination, Andean Peasants, and the Making of the Cornell-Peru Project at Vicos Jason C. Pribilsky, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Whitman College, and Adams Summer Scholar
Cecilia Ballí Colloquium
Wednesday, July 14, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Fence and the River: Border Enforcement in the Age of National Security Cecilia Ballí, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, and Bunting Summer Scholar
Minette C. Church Colloquium
Wednesday, July 7, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Childhood, Materiality, and Identity in the Contested Landscapes of Southern Colorado Minette C. Church, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Cotsen Summer Scholar
June 2010
Erin Debenport Colloquium
Wednesday, June 30, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Literacy, Perfectibility, and Temporality: Reconciling Pueblo Imagined Pasts and Futures Erin Debenport, ACLS/Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Language, Interaction, and Culture, University of California, Los Angeles, and Smeall Summer Scholar
Detail of San Luis Church Field Trip
Friday, June 25, 2010, 7:30 am–5:00 pm History and Folklore of the Rio Puerco Valley Guided by Nasario Garcia and Tom Windes The austere Rio Puerco Valley has attracted a continuum of inhabitants, from Ancestral Puebloans to Navajos to Hispanic farmers....
Daniel Usner Jr. Colloquium
Wednesday, June 23, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Chitimacha Indian Basketmakers and their Patrons: 1890-1940 Daniel H. Usner, Jr., Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University, and Bunting Summer Scholar
Katherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance: Theory, Experiment and Social Engagement Colloquium
Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Katherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance Advanced Seminar Chair Elizabeth Chin, Professor, Critical Theory and Social Justice, Occidental College
May 2010
Sherry Farrell Racette Colloquium
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Break and Enter: Indigenous Research in the Houses of History Sherry Farrell Racette, Associate Professor, Department of Native Studies, University of Manitoba, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn Book Event
Monday, May 24, 2010, 6:00–7:00 pm The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn by Nathaniel Philbrick
A benefit for SAR, sponsored by Garcia Street Books
Nathaniel Philbrick, the critically acclaimed New York Times bestselling author, takes on the ultimate mythic story of the American West: The Battle of the Little Bighorn.
Detail of Toadlena Trading Post Field Trip
Thursday, May 20–Saturday, May 22, 2010 Chacoan Outliers and Navajo Weavers of Northwestern New Mexico Guided by Tom Windes and John Kantner with an overnight in Gallup Archaeologists Tom Windes and John Kantner will take us on a journey through the backroads of northwestern New Mexico, visiting several outlying great houses....
Indigenous Peoples and Salmon in the Northern Pacific Colloquium
Wednesday, May 19, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Indigenous Peoples and Salmon in the Northern Pacific Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Benedict J. Colombi, Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Program, University of Arizona, and James F. Brooks, President, SAR
Stephen Augustine Speaker Series
Thursday, May 13, 2010, 5:30–6:30 pm A Visit to Red Indian Lake in the Summer of 2009: Mi’kmaq and Where’s the Beothuk? A Mi’kmaq Curator Tracks Frank G. Speck’s Visit to Red Indian Lake in 1914 Stephen Augustine, Curator of Eastern Maritime Ethnology, Canadian Museum of Civilization; Mi'kmaq hereditary chief
Marla Allison Artist Talk
Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 5:30–7:00 pm Marla Allison: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2010 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow Marla will be speaking about her work leading up to and during her tenure at SAR. The lecture will be followed by a visit to the Dubin Studio to view her newly created works.
Charles L. Briggs Colloquium
Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Texture of Death: Three Stories from a Mysterious Epidemic Charles L. Briggs, Alan Dundes Distinguished Professor of Folklore and Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of California–Berkeley, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar; and Clara Mantini-Briggs, Visiting Professor, Ethnic Studies Department, University of California–San Diego, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Rethinking Race and Science: Biology, Genes, and Culture Colloquium
Wednesday, May 5, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Rethinking Race and Science: Biology, Genes, and Culture Advanced Seminar Chair John Hartigan, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas–Austin
April 2010
Ann McMullen Speaker Series
Friday, April 30, 2010, 5:30–6:30 pm Opening the Doors: Putting the National Museum of the American Indian Collections Online Ann McMullen, Ph.D., Curator and Head of Collections Research and Documentation, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution
Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions Field Trip
Friday, April 30–Saturday, May 1, 2010 The Salinas Pueblos: One Thousand Years of Village Life in Central New Mexico Guided by Alison Rautman with an overnight in Mountainair East of the rugged Manzano Mountains are the remains of three large pueblos and their 17th-century Spanish Colonial missions. Explore these with archaeologist Alison Rautman....
Capuchin Monkey Lecture
Thursday, April 29, 2010, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members The Evolution of Monetary Irrationality Laurie Santos (Yale University) Monkeys make “human” economic errors, and some human financial errors are evolutionarily ancient.
Ninja Turtle figure Colloquium
Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Presentations by 2009–2010 IARC Interns Dominic J. Henry (Diné), Anne Ray Native Intern and M.A. Candidate, Museum Studies, University of Oklahoma and Kendall Tallmadge (Ho-Chunk), Harvey W. Branigar Jr. Native Intern and Museum Consultant, Ho-Chunk Nation
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 21, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Illness, Death, and Loss in New England, 1840–1916: The Role of Tuberculosis Alan C. Swedlund, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and External Professor, Santa Fe Institute
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Splendor in the Jungle: The Rise and Fall of Ankor Wat Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research
Pagosa Hot Springs, Colorado Sparks
Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm The Disappearing Colorado: Water Crisis in the West V. B. Price What are the potential consequences for urban life in the American West if drought becomes chronic and the reservoirs of the Colorado and Rio Grande Rivers run dry?
Celebration Special Event
Wednesday, April 7, 2010, 4:00–6:00 pm Membership Appreciation “Open House” Special event for Members only
Christopher B. Teuton Colloquium
Wednesday, April 7, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Standing in the Doorway: Teachings and Stories of the Turtle Island Liars’ Club Christopher B. Teuton, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Denver, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
March 2010
James Trostle Colloquium
Wednesday, March 31, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Ethnography of a Bus Ride in Northern Coastal Ecuador James A. Trostle, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Trinity College, Hartford, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Santa Fe Black-on-white bowl Symposium
Saturday, March 27, 2010, 1:00–5:00 pm Beneath the City Different: The Archaeology of Santa Fe (Redux) Sponsored by SAR and Friends of Archaeology Seven archaeologists will give presentations on different periods of Santa Fe’s history, from ancient to modern times during an afternoon series of talks...
The Difference Kinship Makes: Rethinking the Ideologies of Modernity Colloquium
Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Difference Kinship Makes: Rethinking the Ideologies of Modernity Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs Susan McKinnon, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Virginia, and Fenella Cannell, Reader, Department of Social Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science
Detail of Aldo Leopold’s Early Home Field Trip
Friday, March 19, 2010, 7:30 am–5:00 pm Journey through Time Guided by Linda Cordell and Felipe Ortega The journey through time will take us across north-central New Mexico from El Rito to La Madera and on to Tres Piedras....
Meditating Monk Lecture
Thursday, March 18, 2010, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members Buddhist Economics: An Oxymoron? Donald Swearer (Harvard University) …Buddhism is as concerned with worldly pursuits and aspirations as with otherworldly mysticism.
Christina Kreps Speaker Series
Thursday, March 18, 2010, 5:30–6:30 pm Indigenous Curation and Museum Ethics in the Post-Colonial Era Christina Kreps, Ph.D., Associate Professor; Director of Museum Studies; Director, University of Denver Museum of Anthropology
Lynn M. Morgan Colloquium
Wednesday, March 17, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Claiming Rosa Parks: Debates over Health and Human Rights in Latin America Lynn M. Morgan, Mary E. Woolley Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mount Holyoke College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, March 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, University of New Mexico
Cylinder jars found in Pueblo Bonito Sparks
Tuesday, March 9, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm Cylinder Jars and Chocolate in Chaco Canyon Patricia Crown Archaeologist Patricia Crown will discuss what the discovery of chocolate at Chaco Canyon means for our understanding of interactions between the Southwest and Mesoamerica.
Celebrate! The Parties of El Delirio: Featuring Photos from the Santa Fe Estate of Elizabeth and Martha White, 1926–1950 Exhibit
Friday, March 5–Tuesday, June 1, 2010 Celebrate! The Parties of El Delirio: Featuring Photos from the Santa Fe Estate of Elizabeth and Martha White, 1926–1950 Research and captions by Nancy Owen Lewis, Director of Scholar Programs El Delirio or “the madness” as they called it, became the setting for lavish dinners, concerts, poetry readings, pool parties, plays, and masquerade balls....as revealed in these photos of “The Parties of El Delirio.”
February 2010
Ruth Phillips Speaker Series
Thursday, February 25, 2010, 5:30–6:30 pm Bringing Heritage Home: Electronic Access, Digital Repatriation, and the Sharing of Knowledges about Great Lakes Indigenous Traditions Ruth Phillips, Ph.D., Canada Research Chair in Modern Culture, Professor of Art History, Carleton University
Pu with Openwork Interlaced Dragons Design Lecture
Thursday, February 18, 2010, 6:30–7:30 pm The Circulation of Wealth in Bronze Age China Lothar von Falkenhausen (University of California–Los Angeles) … archaeological evidence offers the best hope for understanding the rise of imperial states in China and Central Eurasia during the late first millennium B.C.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 17, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm One Revolt, Two Revolts, Three Revolts, More? Cycles of Religious Evangelism and Popular Response in the Puebloan Southwest James F. Brooks, President, School for Advanced Research
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm History and Memories of Colonialism in A.C. Jordan’s Novel, “The Wrath of the Ancestors” Nicholas M. Creary, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Ohio University
Window Portal in the IARC Building Sparks
Tuesday, February 9, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm Preserving Santa Fe’s Historic Homes Elaine Bergman Elaine Bergman, Executive Director of the Historic Santa Fe Foundation, will take us on a virtual tour of Santa Fe’s historic homes.
W. Jackson Rushing, III Speaker Series
Friday, February 5, 2010, 5:30–6:30 pm Native American Art History in the 21st Century: In Theory, In Practice W. Jackson Rushing, III, Ph.D., Professor of Art History, University of Oklahoma
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Anthropology, Human Capabilities, and Occupational Justice Gelya Frank, Professor, Department of Anthropology and Division of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California
January 2010
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Poetry Reading Malena Mörling, Associate Professor, Department of Creative Writing, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 13, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Creation of Pueblo Art Pottery and the Santa Fe Indian Market Bruce Bernstein, Executive Director, Southwestern Association for Indian Arts
Wild Horses, 1949 Sparks
Tuesday, January 12, 2010, 3:00–4:00 pm Bringing Home All the Pretty Horses Dan Flores Historian Dan Flores illuminates a fascinating event that occurred after the 1680 Pueblo Revolt, when horses from the Southwest escaped into the Southern Plains.
December 2009
Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh Speaker Series
Friday, December 11, 2009, 5:30–6:30 pm “They Are Digging Up Our Ancestors”: Archaeology in an Age of Accountability Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Ph.D., Curator of Anthropology & NAGPRA Officer, Denver Museum of Nature & Science
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, December 9, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Homeschooling the Enchanted Child: Ambivalent Attachments in the Domestic Southwest Rebecca A. Allahyari, SAR Research Associate
Hindi Sparks
Tuesday, December 8, 2009, 3:00–4:00 pm Los Arabes de Nuevo México [Cancelled] Monika Ghattas Beginning in the late 1880s, Syrian-Lebanese immigrants began arriving in the New Mexico territory, looking for economic opportunities.
November 2009
Nancy Mithlo Speaker Series
Friday, November 20, 2009, 5:30–6:30 pm Within and Outside: The American Indian Presence at the Venice Biennale, 1999–2009 Nancy Mithlo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Untitled, 2008 Panel
Thursday, November 19, 2009, 2:00–4:00 pm Essential Aesthetics: An Exploration of Contemporary Indigenous Art and Identity Panel Discussion with Mario Caro, Robert Jahnke, Gerald McMaster, Nancy Mithlo, Nora Naranjo Morse, and Mina Sakai
Eagle Spirit Artist Talk
Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 5:30–7:00 pm Adrian Wall: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2009 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow
Clara Mantini-Briggs Colloquium
Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Chronic Cultural Impossibility: A Physician’s Reflections on How an Anthropological Concept is Used in Legitimizing Injustice Clara Mantini-Briggs, Visiting Professor, Ethnic Studies Department, University of California, San Diego; Visiting Scholar, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley; and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Christopher B. Teuton Colloquium
Wednesday, November 11, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Cherokee Stories of the Turtle Island Liars’ Club: Narrative, Community, and Cultural Revival Christopher B. Teuton, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Denver, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
Cow Skull on Ghost House Sparks
Tuesday, November 10, 2009, 3:00–4:00 pm Ghost Ranch and the Faraway Nearby Craig Varjabedian In New Mexico, the Spanish phrase “La Querencia” is an endearing term for place of the heart. “La Querencia” is personified in the visual imagery of Ghost Ranch....
Santa Fe Black-on-white bowl Symposium
Saturday, November 7, 2009, 1:00–5:00 pm Beneath the City Different: The Archaeology of Santa Fe Sponsored by SAR and Friends of Archaeology Seven archaeologists will give presentations on different periods of Santa Fe’s history, from ancient to modern times during an afternoon series of talks...
Cylinder jars found in Pueblo Bonito Lecture
Thursday, November 5, 2009, 6:30–7:30 pm Turquoise, Trumpets, and Tchamahias: The Wealth of Chaco Canyon John Kantner (School for Advanced Research) … what we know about Chacoan notions of wealth and value and how these concepts changed over time.
James Trostle Colloquium
Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Do Roads Lead to Wellness? Development and Disease in Coastal Ecuador James A. Trostle, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Trinity College, Hartford, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
October 2009
Steven Loft Speaker Series
Thursday, October 29, 2009, 5:30–6:30 pm Indians in Space: Curating Media Art by Indigenous Artists Steven Loft, Aboriginal Curator-in-Residence, National Gallery of Canada; Former Director, Urban Shaman Gallery
Lynn M. Morgan Colloquium
Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Reproductive Rights and Wrongs in Contemporary Latin America Lynn M. Morgan, Mary E. Woolley Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mount Holyoke College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
“Buccaneer of the Caribbean” Lecture
Thursday, October 15, 2009, 6:30–7:30 pm, Free for SAR members X Marks the Spot…Or Does It? Fact and Fiction in the Study of Piracy Russell Skowronek (University of Texas–Pan American) … popular, romanticized ideas of pirates and piracy are compared to evidence uncovered by archaeologists.
Dinétah Fortress Field Trip
Thursday, October 15–Saturday, October 17, 2009 Ancestral Navajo: Rock Art & Pueblitos de Dinétah Guided by Larry Baker and Alex Mitchell Scattered in the ancestral Navajo homeland are small defensive sites, “Pueblitos,” that the Navajos constructed in the 18th century to protect themselves from slaving raids....
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm On Vampire Bats and a Mysterious Epidemic: Indigenous Leadership, Medicine, Anthropology, and Death in the Rainforest Charles L. Briggs, Alan Dundes Distinguished Professor of Folklore and Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, and Clara Mantini-Briggs, Visiting Scholar, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
James F. Hinkle 1923-25 Sparks
Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 3:00–4:00 pm Buried Treasures: Famous and Unusual Gravesites in New Mexico History Richard Melzer New Mexico history is filled with noteworthy men, women, and children. Sadly, few of these famous New Mexicans are honored with monuments....
Sherry Farrell Racette Colloquium
Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Coat Stories: Reclaiming Knowledge and Narratives from Material Culture Sherry Farrell Racette, Associate Professor, Department of Native Studies and Women & Gender Studies, University of Manitoba, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
Snake Petroglyph in White Rock Canyon Field Trip
Saturday, October 3, 2009, 7:30 am–4:30 pm Awanyu Guardians of White Rock Canyon Guided by Robert “Bob” Powers and Rory Gauthier White Rock Canyon is one of the jewels of the Pajarito Plateau, with magnificent views, beautiful rock art, and farming sites hidden in the canyon bottom.
September 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Toward a Global Human History: Agency and the Explanation of Long-Term Change Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs John E. Robb, Senior Lecturer, Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University, and Timothy Pauketat, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois
Bobbie Conner Speaker Series
Thursday, September 24, 2009, 5:30–6:30 pm Tamástslikt: A Tribal Museum Turning History Over and Turning Lives Around Bobbie Conner, Director, Tamástslikt Cultural Institute
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm The Origins of the Great Pueblos: New Advances from Research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Clash of Titans: The Inca Emperor Atahualpa and the Spanish Conquistador Pizarro Charles Stanish, Director, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Mary Cabot Wheelwright Field Trip
Friday, September 11, 2009, 8:30 am–3:00 pm The Historic Los Luceros Hacienda Guided by Lea Armstrong and Marie Markenstein The historic 140-acre property is nestled along the Rio Grande and was home to Mary Cabot Wheelwright, founder of the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations 2009–2010 SAR Resident Fellows
Thomas B. Catron, Circa. 1917 Sparks
Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 3:00–4:00 pm The Santa Fe Ring: Gilded Age Politics in Old New Mexico David L. Caffey If you think New Mexico politics is rough-and-tumble today, consider the latter half of the 19th century, when the “Santa Fe Ring” held sway....
Water Vase by Ulysses Reid Field Trip
Friday, September 4, 2009, 8:30 am–3:30 pm The Art of Zia Pueblo Guided by Ulysses Reid Join us on a special field trip to honor Zia potter Ulysses Reid, this summer’s “Artist in Residence” at the Indian Arts Research Center.
August 2009
Textile Seminar Tour
Wednesday, August 19–Friday, August 21, 2009 Indian Market Tours Indian Arts Research Center IARC at the School for Advanced Research is offering special tours of its collection of Native American art before Indian Market weekend, Aug. 19–21.
Advanced Seminar: Nature, Science, and Religion Colloquium
Wednesday, August 19, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Nature, Science, and Religion: Intersections Shaping Society and the Environment Advanced Seminar Chair Catherine M. Tucker, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University
Native Foods Field Trip
Saturday, August 8, 2009, 8:00 am–3:00 pm Native Foods: Culinary Field Trip and Farm Tour Chef Lois Ellen Frank; Clayton Brascoupe, Director of the Traditional Native American Farmers Association; and Eremita and Margaret Campos’s family farm Award-winning chef Lois Ellen Frank will be our guide as we learn about the region’s history and the revitalization of traditional Native seeds, foods, and farming methods.
Water Vase by Ulysses Reid Artist Talk
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 5:30–7:00 pm Ulysses Reid: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2009 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Buddha and the Bees: Recursive Innovations and Community Self-Fashioning among Sri Lankan Potters Deborah Winslow, Cultural Anthropology Program Director and Ecology of Infectious Disease Program Co-Director, Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, National Science Foundation; SAR Visiting Research Associate
July 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm After the Fall: Iron Age Political and Economic Dynamics in Central Anatolia Peter Grave, Convenor, Department of Archaeology and Paleoanthropology, University of New England, and Lisa Kealhofer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Santa Clara University; Cotsen Summer Scholar
Archaic and Historic Rock Art in the Rio Grande Gorge Field Trip
Saturday, July 25, 2009, 7:00 am–2:30 pm Archaic and Historic Rock Art in the Rio Grande Gorge Guided by Severin Fowles Archaeologist and Barnard College professor Severin Fowles is in his third summer of investigating the Archaic and historic sites of the Rio Grande Gorge, a formidable place often overlooked by other Southwest archaeologists, but one that was prehistorically used by the Jicarilla Apache, Utes, Comanche, and Picuris and Taos Pueblos.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Navigating Archives and Special Collections Libraries for Native American Research Ann Massmann, Associate Professor, Center for Southwest Research, University of New Mexico; Bunting Summer Scholar
A History of the Ancient Southwest Book Event
Sunday, July 19, 2009, 2:00–4:00 pm Lecture and Book Signing for “A History of the Ancient Southwest” Stephen H. Lekson Please join us for a lecture and book signing at the New Mexico History Museum with Stephen H. Lekson, author of the new book, A History of the Ancient Southwest.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm When Researchers Meet the Researched: Interpretations of Proper Exchange in International AIDS Research in Rural Malawi Crystal Biruk, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania; Bunting Summer Scholar
Robert Tenorio Pottery Field Trip
Saturday, July 11, 2009, 8:00 am–2:00 pm Santo Domingo Pottery Firing: Santo Domingo Pueblo Santo Domingo potter Robert Tenorio Join in the fun by participating in a traditional pottery-making demonstration. Santo Domingo potter Robert Tenorio enjoys teaching his knowledge of Puebloan pottery by involving people in the process of creation.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Aleš Hrdlička and the Anthropology of the Unwanted J. Andrew Darling, Director, Cultural Resource Management Program, Gila River Indian Community; Adams Summer Scholar
Window Portal in the IARC Building Field Trip
Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 10:00–11:00 am Santo Domingo Pottery Firing: Preview of Santo Domingo Pottery at the Indian Arts Research Center Santo Domingo potter Robert Tenorio As a preview to the July 11th trip, Robert Tenorio will meet on Tuesday with participants in the Indian Arts Research Center at SAR to share his knowledge of Santo Domingo pottery.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Quelling Anguish: A Political Economy of Emotions in the Everyday Life of Youth Heads of Household in Kigali, Rwanda Maggie Zraly, NSF International Research Fellow, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, National University of Rwanda; Bunting Summer Scholar
June 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, June 24, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm The Spatio-temporal Effects of Enclosing Palestine Julie Peteet, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Louisville; Bunting Summer Scholar
Puye Cliff Dwellings Field Trip
Friday, June 12, 2009, 8:00 am–2:00 pm Exploring Puye Cliff Dwellings: A Family Trip Guided by members of Santa Clara This historic landmark in the beautiful Santa Clara Canyon was home to over 1,500 Pueblo Indians, the ancestors of the Tewa people of Santa Clara Pueblo.
May 2009
IARC Collections Assistant Sylvanus Paul Symposium
Thursday, May 28, 2009, 10:00 am–4:00 pm Native Collections and Pesticides: Testing, Analysis, and Mediation Speakers: Nancy Odegaard, PhD, Cheryl Podsiki, and Özge Gençay Üstün Conservators from institutions with large Native American collections will present on their work and experiences detecting and dealing with pesticides on collection items.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Ancient Religion from the Ground Up Timothy R. Pauketat, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
The Early History of Chocolate Lecture
Thursday, May 14, 2009, 7:00–8:00 pm The Early History of Chocolate John Henderson, Mayan Archaeologist Dr. Henderson’s rich talk takes a careful look at archaeological evidence that indicates chocolate was an essential component of all important ceremonial and social occasions among the Aztecs and their Mesoamerican neighbors.
Yuppie Indian Couple Artist Talk
Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 5:30–7:00 pm Pat Courtney Gold: Artist Talk, Reception, and Open Studio 2009 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow
Resident Scholar Dean Falk Colloquium
Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm From Piltdown Man to Hobbit: Of Missing Links and Paleopolitics Dean Falk, Hale G. Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, and SAR Resident Fellow
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, May 6, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Markets and Moralities Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs: Edward F. Fischer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, and Peter Benson, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington University
April 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 29, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Intention, Enchantment, and the Aesthetics of Renewal in the Art of the Prehistoric Southwest Marit Munson, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Trent University, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Redefining the “Normal” in Women’s Health: The View from Evolutionary Medicine Wenda Trevathan, Regents Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, New Mexico State University, and SAR Resident Fellow
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Violence in the Digital Age: Youth and Spectacular Performance in the Sierra Leone and Liberia Wars Daniel J. Hoffman, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
SAR Logo Lecture
Thursday, April 9, 2009, 7:00–8:00 pm, Free for SAR members What’s Cooking?: The Meat and Potatoes of Human Evolution Jeanne Sept Jeanne Sept’s lecture explores the relative importance of plant and animal foods in the diets of our early ancestors.
March 2009
SAR Logo Lecture
Thursday, March 5, 2009, 7:00–8:00 pm, Free for SAR members To Hunt and Be Hunted: Deer in the Ancient and Modern Americas Mary Weismantel Wherever humans have encountered deer, they have hunted them. The relationship between people and deer seems straightforward enough. But in fact, the relationship is rarely simple. Perhaps nowhere is this truer than in the indigenous traditions of the Americas, where Native peoples have often portrayed deer as killers of men.
October 2008
SAR Logo Lecture
Thursday, October 30, 2008, 7:00–8:00 pm, Free for SAR members Plenty and Poverty: Food Security in the New Millennium Miriam Chaiken
September 2008
SAR Logo Lecture
Thursday, September 11, 2008, 7:00–8:00 pm, Free for SAR members Uncorking the Past: Our Love Affair with Fermented Beverages Patrick McGovern The history of human kind and civilization is, in many ways, the history of the fermented beverage. Archaeologist Patrick McGovern takes us on a fascinating odyssey back to the earliest experiments with fermentation, which created mind-altering substances, medicines, religious symbols, and social lubricants all rolled into one.
August 2008
SAR Logo Symposium
Thursday, August 21–Wednesday, August 27, 2008 Corporate Lives: New Perspectives on the Social Life of the Corporate Form Anthropologists and corporate practitioners from a wide range of institutions and career paths both within and beyond the academy came together at SAR to examine how corporations are increasingly taking on roles typically associated with nation-states, shaping governance and managing daily life.