Past Colloquiums

September 2017
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 20, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2017-2018 Resident Scholars, Anne Ray Interns, and the Native Artist Our newest group of scholars, Native artist and interns will present short synopses of the work they will be pursuing during their terms at SAR. Register for this Colloquium here.
May 2017
Saeko Yamada, 2016-2017 Anne Ray Intern Colloquium
Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free IARC Intern Presentations Saeko Yamada and Nina Sanders, Indian Arts Research Center, SAR Ms. Yamada’s presentation examines the integration of the living narratives Native peoples associate with their cultural belongings; and how museum professionals can integrate these intangible relationships with material things into their work.

Ms. Sander’s presentation uncovers the history, politics, legends, and authenticity involving the protection, trade, and selling of sacred objects in Crow Country.
Colloquium
Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free New Perspectives from Archaeology on Ancient Empires Advanced Seminar Archaeology has a unique potential for investigating the constitution and dynamics of empires because it provides us with access to unrecorded peoples, places, and activities. These datasets allow us to explore both the heterogeneity of ancient empires and to identify structural similarities between empires as they play out on the ground. The case studies presented in this seminar provide expert assessments of historically-specific configurations of key ancient empires across the globe.
November 2016
Alison Heller Colloquium
Wednesday, November 9, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Bad Births, Bad Bodies: Obstetric Fistula and Treatment Seeking in Niger In the West African country of Niger, 1 in 23 women will die from maternal causes and 5-13 more will survive with chronic disabilities. How are women who suffer from fistula represented in the Global North? Does it matter? Based on 18 months of research in Niger, this talk by Alison Heller will explore these and other questions.
David Romo Colloquium
Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Nazis & Global Pachucos: Propaganda, Intelligence and the Production of Border Invasion Anxiety During World War II Dr. David Romo will explore the impact of German, Japanese, British, American and Mexican propaganda and intelligence activities along the U.S.-Mexico border before and during World War II.
October 2016
Luis Urrieta Colloquium
Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Resurgent Indigeneity: Re/Making Indígena and Community through Education In Resurgent Indigeneity, Luis Urrieta will explore and analyze the development of a rural mothers’ movement which by re/claiming an indígena (indigenous) identity in Michoacán, Mexico successfully agitated for a bilingual (P’hrépecha/Spanish) bicultural school for their children.
Gregorio Gonzales Colloquium
Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Sı Eres Genízaro: Recognition, Belonging, and Genízaro Indigeneity in Northern New Mexico Blending archival and ethnographic research with innovative theoretical and methodological frameworks, this colloquium presentation will attend to particular histories and experiences of Genízaro social life within the Pueblo de Abiquiú and Ranchos de Taos. Through this critical work, Gregorio Gonzales will explore how community-based articulations of Genízaro identity continue to navigate the racial geographies and national imaginaries of northern New Mexico and beyond.
Nathaniel Millett Colloquium
Wednesday, October 12, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Analyzing the Impact of Native Peoples on the Anglo-Caribbean during the Early Modern Era Dr. Nathaniel Millett’s colloquium focuses on the myriad of ways that Native Americans shaped the societies of the British West Indies from the sixteenth century through the nineteenth century. The ultimate purpose of Millet’s study is to present a new and systematic view into the history of the Anglo-Atlantic world from a perspective that is largely black and Indian.
Miriam Kolar Colloquium
Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Listening Across Time and Geography: Exploring Sound in Archaeology Immediate, ephemeral, dynamic: sound pervades human experience and communication. Sharing examples from her integrative archaeoacoustics fieldwork in the Andes, Dr. Miriam Kolar demonstrates how a multidisciplinary fusion of methodologies––acoustical, psychoacoustical, musical, ethnological, and computational, among others––enriches our understanding of ancient life.
September 2016
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 28, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free How Nature Works How Nature Works aims to develop an anthropology of labor and work that is attuned and accountable to the potentially irreversible effects of climate change, extinction, and deforestation. The goal of this seminar is to respond philosophically and politically by going beyond the anthropocentric documentation of human work on nature, and instead attempt to develop a language for thinking about how nature works. 
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2016-2017 Resident Scholars, Anne Ray Interns, and the Native Artist Our newest group of scholars, artist and interns will present short synopses of the work they will be pursuing over the next nine months at SAR.
July 2016
Tracy L. Brown, 2016 Summer Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, July 27, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free ‘Half Indians’: Pueblo Governance and Sovereignty after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Tracy L. Brown, Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Social Work, Central Michigan University Dr. Brown will be conducting archival research at the State Records Center and the Center for Southwest Studies this summer investigating how (or if) the ambiguous status of the 'real' Indian impacted the political functioning of Pueblo communities between 1848 and 1913. During her colloquia presentation, she will discuss her findings and the status of her project.
Colloquium
Wednesday, July 20, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Orientalism on Trial: Enrico Cerulli and the United Nations War Crimes Commission James De Lorenzi, Associate Professor, Department of History, John Jay College, CUNY Dr. De Lorenzi’s talk explores the stormy relationship of Heruy Walda Selasse (1878-1938), the foremost Ethiopian intellectual of the early twentieth century, and Enrico Cerulli (1898-1988), the distinguished Italian orientalist and longtime colonial administrator.  It examines the intertextual politics of their research and larger questions concerning the relationship between vernacular and academic knowledge.
Colloquium
Wednesday, July 13, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Tinkering with Armageddon Hugh Gusterson, Professor, Department of Anthropology and International Affairs, George Washington University Based on interviews at the weapons labs and in Washington DC, this talk asks why the U.S. decided to give up nuclear testing and how the weapons labs developed a new organizational culture to replace one grounded in nuclear testing.  And it asks the ultimate question: how can we be sure the weapons still work if we cannot test them?
Hoda Bandeh-Ahmadi, 2016 Summer Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, July 6, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anthropological Generations: A Post-Independence Ethnography of Academic Anthropology and Sociology in India Hoda Bandeh-Ahmadi, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan Ms. Bandeh-Ahmadi’s talk explores the disciplinary and sub-disciplinary boundaries that emerged within and around the University of Delhi (DU) anthropology department in the decades after India’s independence in 1947.
June 2016
Michael Messner, 2016 Summer Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Guys Like Me: Six Wars, Six Veterans for Peace Michael Messner, Professor, Department of Sociology and Gender Studies, University of Southern California “Guys Like Me” is a life-history study of six U.S. men, combat veterans of WW II, Korea, Vietnam, Gulf, Afghanistan and Iraq wars, who became lifelong advocates for peace.
May 2016
Jennifer Himmelreich and Annie Brooke Lang Colloquium
Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free IARC Intern Presentations Jennifer Himmelreich and Annie Brooke Lang, Indian Arts Research Center, SAR Ms. Himmelreich’s presentation examines the use of New Media projects within indigenous communities, and shares both promising practices as well as ideas for thoughtful, sustainable use of the technologies that have exploded around us.

Ms. Brooke Lang’s presentation explores the creation, decline, and preservation of the art of the Tesuque Rain Gods and whether they can be defined as traditional art forms.
April 2016
Colloquium
Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A World of Walls: Why are we Building New Barriers to Divide Us? Advanced Seminar co-chairs, Randall H. McGuire, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Binghamton University, and Laura McAtackney, Associate Professor in Sustainable Heritage Management, Aarhus University, Denmark How do contemporary walls succeed and/or fail at resolving problems and what are the unforeseen repercussions of an increasingly materially segregated world?
March 2016
Nicole Taylor, Director of Scholar Programs at SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Schooled on Fat: What Teens Tell Us about Gender, Body Image, and Obesity Nicole Taylor, Director of Scholar Programs, SAR Drawing on ethnographic examples from nine months of fieldwork at a southern Arizona high school, Nicole Taylor explores how adolescent boys and girls managed their body size, social status, and identities as body-conscious individuals within the broader social milieu of panic about overweight and obesity in the US.
Colloquium
Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free New Geospatial Approaches in Anthropology Advanced Seminar co-chairs, Robert L. Anemone, Professor and Department Head, Dept. of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Greenboro, and Glenn C. Conroy, Professor, Depts. of Anthropology and Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University Bringing together a diverse group of remote sensing specialists and anthropologists - including primatologists, paleoanthropologists, and Old World and New World archaeologists – this seminar will explore tools, techniques and methods derived from the geographic information sciences to describe, map, and analyze a variety of spatially distributed anthropological data.
David E. Stuart Colloquium
Wednesday, March 2, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Four Families and their Quest for the American Dream, Part II, 1770’s - 1940 David E. Stuart, Professor, Dept. of Anthropology, UNM, and Senior Scholar, SAR At SAR members’ request, David Stuart presents Part II (1770's-- 1940) of his American Family saga of the Vandergrifts, Harts, Goldsboroughs and Dunsmores.
February 2016
David Treuer, 2015-2016 Resident Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Writing Living History David Treuer, Professor, Dept. of English, University of Southern California Dr. Treuer will discuss the strategies (and the difficulties) in writing living history in relation to his book-in-progress, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee.
October 2015
Karen Hébert, 2015-2016 Resident Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free New Species of Environmental Politics: Taking Sides with Salmon in Coastal Alaska Karen Hébert, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anthropology, and School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University, and Weatherhead Scholar, SAR Salmon has become the centerpiece of recent efforts to protest controversial resource development proposals in coastal Alaska.  Residents of coastal communities who once competed to use salmon now compete to be useful to salmon as a means of gaining legitimacy in environmental contests.  How has salmon emerged as such a mobilizing force, and what does this reveal about environmental politics in the present?
Puebloan Societies: New Perspectives Across the Subfields Colloquium
Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Puebloan Societies: New Perspectives Across the Subfields Advanced Seminar, Chair: Peter Whiteley, Anthropology Curator, American Museum of Natural History Over the last two decades new understandings have emerged of Puebloan social systems in all their diachronic and cultural diversity, necessitating a reassessment of cumulative knowledge. The Puebloan Societies seminar will address Puebloan social formations of the past and present from a variety of comparative perspectives, using a four-field anthropological approach. Dr. Whitely will discuss the processes and goals of the seminar.
Maylei Blackwell, 2015-2016 Resident Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Scales of Justice: Indigenous Women’s Transborder Organizing and the Practice of Autonomy in the Age of Neoliberalism Maylei Blackwell, Associate Professor, Cesar E. Chavez Dept. of Chicana and Chicano Studies, UCLA, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR Dr. Blackwell’s presentation will present an overview of her forthcoming book set for completion while in residence at SAR entitled, Scales of Justice: Indigenous Women’s Transborder Organizing and the Practice of Autonomy in the Age of Neoliberalism. This book illuminates the complex, cross border and transnational dialogues among indigenous women activists that are reshaping indigenous demands for autonomy in Mexico, within international policy arenas, and within the migrant stream to the US.
Brian Burke Colloquium
Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Becoming Non-capitalists: Alternative Economies and the Transformation of Subjectivities in Medellín, Colombia Brian Burke, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Sustainable Development, Appalachian State University, and Visiting Scholar, SAR Colombian activists have established barter systems and alternative currencies as a way to promote a new economy rooted in solidarity and mutual support aiming to almost instinctively live a non-capitalist way of life. In this presentation, Dr. Burke will examine barterers' efforts to cultivate non-capitalist subjectivities and discuss possible lessons for other activists seeking social and cultural change. 
September 2015
Karin Friederic, 2015-2016 Resident Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free “¡El Machismo es Violencia!” Sex, Human Rights, and Masculinity on the Ecuadorian Coast Karin Friederic, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anthropology, Wake Forest University, and Vera Campbell Resident Scholar, SAR In rural coastal Ecuador, human rights campaigns against domestic violence have introduced new ideas about gender, sexuality, and health focusing on “machismo” as the central problem. Intimating that men are inherently violent, questions about whether these campaigns leave room for men to exhibit and accept alternative masculinities are the focus of Dr. Friederic’s discussion.
Susan McKinnon, 2015-2016 Resident Scholar Colloquium
Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Marital Signs of a Progressive Society: The Cousin Marriage Debate in Nineteenth-Century America Susan McKinnon, Professor and Chair, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Virginia, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Well into the nineteenth century, cousin marriage was an emotionally resonant and culturally validated feature of the American social landscape--a means of consolidating family ties, political alliances, and economic relations of labor, landed wealth, and investment capital. Why then, lacking the knowledge of germ theory and disease, did the practice become stigmatized beginning in the 1850’s? Dr. McKinnon will explore possible answers to this and other related questions in her presentation.
Administration Building Colloquium
Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2015-2016 Resident Scholars, the Native Artist Fellow, and the Anne Ray Interns Our newest group of scholars, artist and interns will present short synopses of the work they will be pursuing over the next nine months at SAR.
August 2015
Steven LeBlanc, PhD Colloquium
Monday, August 3, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mimbres Pottery Painters: The Role of Mentoring and its Broader Implications. Steven LeBlanc, PhD, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, and 2005 SAR Arroyo Hondo Summer Scholar The Mimbres bowl painters of present day Southwestern New Mexico are considered by many to be some of the most accomplished artists of the prehistoric Americas. How many artists were there and how did they learn their skills? Using digital archives, Dr. LeBlanc will explore the possible answers to these questions.
July 2015
Adam Johnson Colloquium
Wednesday, July 22, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free How Can You Capture a Snake Dance?: Senses and the Documentary Impulse in Southwesternist Ethnography, 1870-1900 Adam Fulton Johnson, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Michigan, and SAR Summer Fellow Late nineteenth-century anthropologists in the Southwestern United States at times witnessed events in the field that would have been considered racy to a vast majority of their Gilded Age counterparts; but what was the reaction to these depictions by the indigenous community? Mr. Johnson’s discussion will explore the question of how divergent cultures looked at privacy and propriety in the late nineteenth-century American West.
Devaka Premawardhana Colloquium
Wednesday, July 15, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Egress and Regress: Pentecostal Precursors and Parallels in Northern Mozambique Devaka Premawardhana, Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, Colorado College, and SAR Summer Fellow Dr. Premawardhana explores how the Makhuwa people’s historical proclivity toward mobility shapes their manner of relating to Pentacostalism. State administrators’ and Pentecostal missionaries’ attempts to reform the Makhuwa disrupts their traditional patterns of movement; the Makhuwa seem both eager and reluctant to partake of these reforms.
Paola Canova Colloquium
Wednesday, July 8, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Intimate Economies: The Monetization of Ayoreo Women's Sexuality in the Mennonite Colonies of Paraguay's Chaco Region Paola Canova, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology and Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin. In the urban center of the Mennonite Colonies in western Paraguay, locals see the public presence of indigenous Ayoreo “sex workers” as a moral stain on the city and a major social problem. Dr. Canova’s talk will show how the monetization of women's sexuality is not perceived as morally fraught by the Ayoreo despite five decades of intense Christianization.
Liam Michael Brady Colloquium
Wednesday, July 1, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free “That Painting Now is Telling Us Something”: Negotiating and Apprehending Contemporary Meaning in Yanyuwa Rock Art, Northern Australia Liam Michael Brady, Senior Scholar, Monash Indigenous Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, and SAR Summer Fellow Exploring the question of how archaeologists develop a greater awareness and understanding of the present-day significance, meaning, and relevance of archaeological features to indigenous communities, Dr. Brady explores the complex processes by which contemporary meaning is generated for contemporary Yanyuwa (Australian Aboriginal) peoples from rock art sites in northern Australia.
June 2015
Erin Debenport Colloquium
Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Fixing the Books: Secrecy, Literacy, and Perfectibility in Indigenous New Mexico Erin Debenport, Assistant Professor of Ethnology, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico Dr. Debenport traces the history of tribally-directed indigenous language literacy used as part of local language revitalization efforts at a New Mexico Pueblo. Navigating the difficulties raised by Pueblo members regarding the study of culturally sensitive language and materials, Dr. Debenport was able to conduct ethnolinguistic studies over a ten year period.
April 2015
David E. Stuart Colloquium
Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Four Families and their Quest for the American Dream: 1630 – 2000 David Stuart, SAR Senior Scholar As immigrants arrived in early European colonies, they not only disrupted Native American worlds on the Atlantic seaboard, but also struggled to find new ways of adapting to both unfamiliar and highly fluid social, economic, political, and ecological realms. Stuart analyzes their pursuit of success, which later became known as the American dream. It was, and remains, a moving target.
Understanding Patriarchal Beliefs Colloquium
Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 12:00 pm, Free Understanding Patriarchal Beliefs and Practices Cross-Culturally Advanced Seminar, Chairs: Holly Mathews, Professor, Department of Anthropology, East Carolina University; Adriana Manago, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Western Washington University How do patriarchal beliefs and practices take hold psychologically across a range of societies and what are the reasons women sometimes adhere or accommodate to ideologies that oppress and disenfranchise them while at other times they resist and subvert them?
Katherine Barry Colloquium
Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations Katherine Barry and Lilyan Jones, Anne Ray Interns, SAR
Beyond NAGPRA: Culturally Sensitive Approaches at the Indian Arts Research Center
Katherine Barry

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) of 1990 began to change the way museums approach culturally sensitive objects. This talk will discuss the Indian Arts Research Center’s approach to working with collections in a culturally sensitive manner, with particular emphasis on the collaborative nature of these initiatives, policies, and procedures.

The Curious Case of the Zuni Pseudo-Ceremonial Collection: Surviving Salvage Ethnography
Lilyan Jones

Tucked away in the collections of the Indian Arts Research Center is an interesting assembly of strikingly unusual Zuni pottery, referred to as the Pseudo-Ceremonial Collection. This talk explores “faking it,” survivance, adaptation, and the consequences of salvage ethnography on Native cultures.
Patricia Crown Colloquium
Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 12:00 pm, Free A Tale of Two Species: How Chocolate and Macaws became Prestige Items in Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, and Europe Patricia Crown, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, University of New Mexico Far from their tropical home of Mesoamerica, chocolate and macaws spread through Europe, becoming status symbols of the European elite. How did a plant and a bird become prestige items in so many different cultures?
March 2015
Enrique Lamadrid in Okinawa Colloquium
Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 12:00 pm, Free Las Morismas de Santiago y San Juan: Conquest, Re-Conquest, De-Conquest in Choreographic Cultural Memory in the Americas Enrique Lamadrid, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Spanish, University of New Mexico For five centuries, the native and mestizo peoples of the Americas have dramatized their political and cultural struggles in festival and ritual display. Utilizing victory and morality plays, ritual dance, and even contemporary fiesta parades, the Indo-Hispanic peoples contribute to a global conversation about the limits of empire in our own times.
November 2014
Colloquium
Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free From Gypsy Work to EU Recycling: Waste, Race, and Environment in Bulgaria Elana Resnick, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Understanding how waste is produced, collected, stored, circulated, transformed, destroyed, and defined can tell us much about the organization of social life. This becomes clear when observing the Roma (Gypsy) minority in Bulgaria, who comprise about 10 percent of the total population.
The Promise of Infrastructure Colloquium
Wednesday, November 5, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Promise of Infrastructure Advanced Seminar, Chairs: Nikhil Anand, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Environment and Society, University of Minnesota; Hannah Appel, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, UCLA; Akhil Gupta, Professor, Department of Anthropology, UCLA The tension between aspiration and failure, technological progress and its underbelly, makes the everyday life of infrastructure a productive location to examine the entanglements of technology and biopolitics in social life.
October 2014
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 29, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Changing Roles of Ethnicity and Education as Determinants of Fertility: The Case of Kinshasa David Shapiro, Professor of Economics, Demography and Women's Studies, Pennsylvania State University In the mid-1950s, a large-scale survey carried out in the Belgian Congo found substantial differences in fertility of different ethnic groups, with groups from the north of the country in particular showing comparatively low fertility and a high incidence of sterility.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 22, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt and Spanish Reconquest at Tunyo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico Joseph Aguilar, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR The first systematic investigations at the mesa-top refuge community of Tunyo at San Ildefonso Pueblo offer new insights into the pivotal post-revolt period of pueblo history, where in 1694 nine Tewa villages led a successful defense against the reconquest efforts of Don Diego de Vargas.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Indigenous Militancy and Creativity in the Peruvian Amazon: A Forty-Year Perspective on the Awajún Struggle for Cultural Survival Michael Brown, President of the School for Advanced Research The Awajún (Aguaruna) people of Peru’s Upper Amazon have emerged as one of South America’s most influential indigenous societies, known for an ironclad commitment to self-determination and an ability to mobilize other indigenous peoples in common cause.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Comanche New Mexico: Indigenous Archives Severin Fowles, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR We are accustomed to describing eighteenth century New Mexico as a Spanish colony and reading its history from this perspective.
Colloquium
Wednesday, October 1, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Race, Identity, and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians Kelly Fayard, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bowdoin College, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The Poarch Band of Creek Indians, first noted in published records in the 1940s by anthropologist Frank Speck, is located in Alabama, a place where many incorrectly assume that no Native people remain.
September 2014
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Living at the Base of an Active Volcano: Search for Serenity Doug Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research A volcano on an isolated island north of Sicily named Stromboli erupts every fifteen minutes or so sending hot ash and flames several feet into the air. About every ten years, it erupts violently with deadly force. How do people cope with living with this danger?
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 17, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Game of Scientific Clue: It's Humans in the Anthropocene with the Water Mike Agar The issue of water supply and quality in a time of population growth and climate change is a perfect example of the premise that humans have so impacted the Earth that we have entered a new epoch, which many refer to as the Anthropocene.
Colloquium
Wednesday, September 10, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2014-2015 Resident Scholars, the Native Artist Fellow, and the Anne Ray Interns
July 2014
Adriana M. Petryna Colloquium
Wednesday, July 30, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free What is a Horizon? Extinction and Time amid Climate Change Adriana M. Petryna, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation is part of a broader project that examines emerging scientific practices meant to monitor increasingly unpredictable ecosystemic behaviors (from mega-storms to sea level rise) and to inform prospective thinking about how natural systems and societal infrastructures might adapt to imminent ecological dangers linked to global climate change.
Miguel Diaz-Barriga Colloquium
Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Sovereignty, Citizenship, and the US-Mexico Border Wall Miguel Diaz-Barriga, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR; Margaret Ellen Dorsey, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, and Curator of the Border Studies Archive, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation focuses on how Mexican-American and Native American residents of South Texas have protested and in some cases negotiated the design and placement of the US-Mexico border wall.
Barbara J. Mills Colloquium
Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Re-connecting the Past: Network Approaches to Regional Interaction in the Archaeology of the Late Prehispanic Southwest Barbara J. Mills, Professor, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, and Cotsen Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation addresses how network analyses are being used by archaeologists in the Southwest to understand the dynamics of social interactions in the past.
Carol Ann MacLennan Colloquium
Wednesday, July 9, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mining and Water Pollution: The Experience of Two Copper Districts in Michigan and New Mexico Carol Ann MacLennan, Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation investigates the experiences with mining waste from copper production in water-rich and water-scarce environments.
June 2014
João Biehl Colloquium
Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Valley of Lamentation João Biehl, Susan Dod Brown Professor, Department of Anthropology, Princeton University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer Scholar, SAR This presentation explores the Mucker War, a religious and fratricidal conflict that shattered the German settlements of southern Brazil in the nineteenth century.
May 2014
Amy Lonetree Colloquium
Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Research with, by, and for Native Communities: Writing a Visual History of the Ho-Chunk Nation, 1879–1960 Amy Lonetree, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation focuses on the process of writing a tribal history that places at the center of analysis photographs and film imagery from two significant collections currently housed at the Wisconsin Historical Society: the Charles Van Schaick Collection and the Bennett Family Collection.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Costly and Cute: How Helpless Newborns Made Us Human Advanced Seminar, Chairs: Karen R. Rosenberg, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Delaware and Wenda R. Trevathan, Regents Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces The extremely helpless and highly dependent state of the human infant at birth may have been as important in contributing to human biological and cultural evolution as “man the hunter” and “woman the gatherer.”
Islah Jad Colloquium
Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Empowering Women amidst Conflict and Contesting Power in Chaos: Palestinian Women, Local Councils, and Democracy on the West Bank and Gaza Islah Jad, Associate Professor and Director, Women's Studies Institute, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine, and Campbell Scholar, SAR Classic literature portrays local governments as an important path for decentralizing the often centralized state power, thus involving people at the grass roots level to share power. Women, in this context and according to women’s rights universal conventions, can be seen as better served and more empowered.
April 2014
Patricia Baudino Colloquium
Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations Patricia Baudino and Jordan Wilson, Anne Ray Interns, SAR “To be Able to Share: Manifesting Change through Collections-Based Collaboration” by Patricia Baudino; “An Oral History with Delbert Guerin” by Jordan Wilson
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Village Beside an Active Volcano: Searching For Serenity Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, SAR Schwartz will discuss his exploration of the island of Stromboli and how the residents cope with living in the shadow of a deadly volcano.
Kent Blansett Colloquium
Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Expressions of Red Power: A History of American Indian Rock 'n' Roll, 1960–Present Kent Blansett, Assistant Professor of History and Native American Studies at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR This colloquium will highlight the historic roots of American Indian Rock ‘n’ Roll and how Native musicians grappled with the larger political themes that emerged out of the Red Power movement.
March 2014
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Obesity Stigma, Upward Mobility, and Symbolic Body Capital in a Rapidly Changing World Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs Eileen Anderson-Fye, Robson Junior Professor, Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, and Alexandra Brewis Slade, Director and President’s Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change Arizona State University, Tempe The growing global prevalence of obesity is associated with modernization and the adoption of “Western” (i.e., North American) dietary and physical activity practices. Likewise, noted increase in stigma against overweight and obesity in societies that traditionally valued larger bodies is held to be a consequence of modernization.
February 2014
Abigail Winslow Bigham Colloquium
Wednesday, February 26, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Unravelling Genetic Responses to Life at High Altitude Abigail Winslow Bigham, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR Abigail Winslow Bigham and her colleagues conducted genotype-phenotype association studies among a group of Peruvian Quechua who lived at sea level and another group who lived at high altitude. In this talk Bigham presents their findings, which provide key insights into the patterns of genetic adaptation to high altitude in Andean populations, shed light on variants controlling this complex phenotype, and are of potential importance for public health.
Laurie Kain Hart Colloquium
Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Question of Ruins: Buildings and Persons after Political Violence Laurie Kain Hart, Stinnes Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Haverford College, Philadelphia, PA, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation explores two interrelated questions concerning the endurance and reconstitution of communities after civil war and “ethnic cleansing.”
He Li Colloquium
Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Ideas and Great Transformation in Post-Mao China He Li, Professor, Department of Political Science, Merrimack College, North Andover, MA, and Henry Luce Foundation Resident Scholar, SAR The purpose of this talk is to provide a brief overview of the major schools of political thought in post-Mao China. It examines the arguments of the major currents, describes their origins and development, and explores the contribution of the leading thinkers.
January 2014
Jason De León and his son, Ignacio Colloquium
Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Noble Irish Ancestors and Filthy Mexican Invaders: The Uncomfortable Politics of the Archaeology of Undocumented Migration Jason De León, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR In this presentation De León discusses some of the current controversies surrounding the deployment of archaeological methods and theories to understand clandestine border crossings between Mexico and the United States.
December 2013
Amy Lonetree Colloquium
Wednesday, December 18, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Visualizing Survivance: Reclaiming Ho-Chunk History Through the Photographs of Charles Van Schaick, 1879–1942 Amy Lonetree, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation will explore the importance of Charles Van Schaick's photographs and the representation of Ho-Chunk families in this unique and rich collection currently housed at the Wisconsin Historical Society.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, December 11, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Faith-Based Charity and the Security State: Containing People and Finance in Risk Societies Advanced Seminar chair Erica Caple James, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, MIT This talk will provide an overview of an advanced seminar that is exploring the ways in which faith-based humanitarian activities challenge notions of secularism, as well as conceptions of risk and security, in historical and cross-cultural contexts.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, December 4, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Places of Protocol: Memory, Archaeology, and Colonial Legacies on the Columbia River Jon Daehnke, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This presentation explores the development and use of the Cathlapotle Plankhouse located at the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge in Ridgefield, Washington.
November 2013
Islah Jad Colloquium
Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Local Power and Women’s Empowerment in a Conflict Context: Palestinian Women Contesting Power in Chaos Islah Jad, Associate Professor and Director, Women's Studies Institute, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine, and Campbell Scholar, SAR In this presentation, Jad examines what it means for women to claim political representation in the highly complex context of Palestine, characterized by Israeli Occupation and a deep rift over political agendas and means of liberation.
Kent Blansett Colloquium
Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Complicating Red Power: A Political History of Mohawk Activist Richard Oakes, 1942–1972 Kent Blansett, Assistant Professor, Department of History and American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota, Morris, and Lamon Scholar, SAR This presentation explores the life of Native activist Richard Oakes and illustrates how his actions reflected a unique voice of Indigenous leadership within the Red Power movement of the 1960s–1970s.
October 2013
Laurie Kain Hart Colloquium
Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Place, Proximity, and the Transmission of Civil War through Time: Reflections on the Course of Two Balkan Wars, 1946–1949 and 1992–1995 Laurie Kain Hart, Stinnes Professor of Global Studies and Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Haverford College, and NEH Resident Scholar, SAR This presentation explores the sequelae of the Greek Civil War of 1946–1949 in the volatile border-zone of northwest Greek Macedonia for those who returned to home territory after extended forced exile.
Jason De León and his son, Ignacio Colloquium
Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Undocumented: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail Jason De León, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Since 2009, Jason De Leon has directed the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP), a long-term anthropological analysis of clandestine border crossings between Northern Mexico and Southern Arizona.
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Red and the White: The Saga of a Mixed-Race Family in Nineteenth-Century Montana Andrew Graybill, Associate Professor, Department of History, and Director, William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University Graybill explores the shifting grounds of race in Montana (and the wider West) between 1850 and 1900 through the experiences of a single family of mixed native-white ancestry.
Deborah Boehm Colloquium
Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Return(ed): The Temporalities and Geographies of Deportation Deborah Boehm, Associate Professor, Departments of Anthropology and Women's Studies, University, of Nevada, Reno, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This presentation considers the deportation of Mexican nationals from the United States, focusing on migrants with ties to the Mexican states of San Luis Potosí and Zacatecas and several locations throughout the western United States.
He Li Colloquium
Wednesday, October 2, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Chinese Intellectual Discourse on Confucianism and Its Impacts on China’s Transformation He Li, Professor, Department of Political Science, Merrimack College, and Luce Resident Scholar, SAR With the rapid economic growth that has occurred in the past three decades, an increasing number of Chinese intellectuals have become interested in revisiting their Confucian tradition.
September 2013
Pistol Colloquium
Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Moral Economy of Violence in the US Inner City: Ethnographic Notes from Puerto Rican North Philadelphia Philippe Bourgois, Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR; and George Karandinos, Student, Harvard Medical School, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR During an eight-week period in the four square blocks surrounding a North Philadelphia fieldwork site, there were sixteen shootings with three fatalities, three stabbings, and fourteen additional “aggravated assaults.”
2011–2012 Membership Lectures—rev·o·lu·tions Colloquium
Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Insurgency and Social Interaction in the New Kingdom Egyptian Fortress in Jaffa: Entanglement as an Explanatory Model Aaron A. Burke, Associate Professor, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR For approximately 300 years, from c. 1460 to 1150 BCE, Egyptians controlled the former Canaanite port city of Jaffa (ancient Yapu), employing it as a staging ground for regular military campaigns into Canaan and the administration of its empire in the southern Levant....
Administration Building, Spring 2013 Colloquium
Wednesday, September 11, 2013, 12:00–1:30 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2013–2014 Resident Fellows
July 2013
Hannah H. Voorhees Colloquium
Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Delaying Loss: Dilemmas of Cultural and Biological Diversity in the “Long Emergency” of Arctic Warming Hannah H. Voorhees, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR In 2008, polar bears became the first species listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act due to climate change projections. Anticipating endangerment, but unable to intervene directly in its ultimate cause—greenhouse gas emissions—federal wildlife biologists and their Alaska Native conservation partners faced a novel set of questions....
Lindsay A. Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Set for Life: Registers of Responsibility in Canada’s Diamond Basin Lindsay A. Bell, Postdoctoral Scholar, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto, and Christopher Smeall Fellow, SAR This presentation tracks how industry training programs attempt to socialize aboriginal residents into specific resource temporalities and the multiple ways in which trainees embrace, reject, and reconfigure them in light of their own circumstances, histories, and desired futures....
Susan E. Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Placing Care: Embodying Architecture in Outpatient Hospital Care for Immigrant and Refugee Patients Susan E. Bell, Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bowdoin College, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR “Placing Care” draws on nine months of fieldwork to explore the impact of physical space, routines, regulations, and technologies on encounters between adult immigrant/refugee patients and caregivers in two outpatient clinics in one hospital in Maine....
Mindy Morgan Colloquium
Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anthropologists at Work: The Production and Reproduction of Anthropological Knowledge in Indians at Work, 1933–1945 Mindy Morgan, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Michigan State University, and William Y. and Nettie K. Adams Fellow, SAR “Anthropologists at Work” explores the ways in which anthropological expertise was produced in Indians at Work, a magazine published by the Office of Indian Affairs from 1933–1945.
Gretchen Wren Purser Colloquium
Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Broke and Brokered in the Day Labor Business Gretchen Wren Purser, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Maxwell School of Syracuse University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Day labor agencies—colloquially referred to as labor pools or body shops—exemplify several of the most consequential features of the neoliberal landscape of employment, including the spread of precarious work and the increased role of labor market intermediaries....
June 2013
SAR Boardroom and Sky Colloquium
Wednesday, June 26, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Stone Age Seafarers in the Greek Island Curtis Runnels, Professor, Department of Archaeology, Boston University, and Cotsen Fellow, SAR Our earliest ancestors evolved in Africa and subsequently colonized the Eurasian continent in successive waves, leading to the permanent presence of humans there about one million years ago. Archaeologists have assumed that these dispersals were by land through the Near East and that early humans could not or did not dare to cross large bodies of open water like the Mediterranean....
May 2013
Lisa Hsu Barrera Colloquium
Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations Lisa Barrera and Melvin Sarracino, Anne Ray Interns, SAR “Connecting Collections to the Community: Best Practices and Recommendations for the California State Indian Museum’s Basketry Collection” by Lisa Barrera and “The Cultural Relevance of K’unee to K’awaika’a-mesch” by Melvin Sarracino
Karen L. Kramer during a colloquium presentation Colloquium
Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free 21st Century Hunting and Gathering Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Brian F. Codding, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, and Karen L. Kramer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah In this talk, Codding and Kramer provide a brief review of hunter-gatherer studies, discuss results emerging from contemporary research and provide a preliminary framework aimed at understanding contemporary life in hunter-gatherer societies.
Margaret Wickens Pearce Colloquium
Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Surface Dialogues Margaret Pearce, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Kansas, and Anne Ray Fellow, SAR It is simpler to connect cultures with cartography when the stories can be told in vector: using points, lines, and words.
April 2013
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Literary Anthropology Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs Anand Pandian, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University, and Stuart McLean, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota Pandian and McLean will propose a closer and more sustained engagement with anthropology's literary dimensions as a means of highlighting the discipline's unique position among the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and creative arts, and as an important way of engaging wider audiences....
Maxine McBrinn Colloquium
Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Resistant Foragers: Foraging and Maize Cultivation in the Northern Rio Grande Maxine McBrinn, Curator of Archaeology, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture In much of the Southwest, people are thought to have been significantly invested in farming by CE 200 and earlier. However, there are areas within the region, such as the Jornada Mogollon and the Northern Rio Grande, where populations continued higher levels of mobility until much later....
Elise M. Edwards Colloquium
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Fukushima’s Victories and Victims: The Fateful Alliance of Japanese Soccer and Nuclear Power Elise Edwards, Associate Professor, Department of History and Anthropology, Butler University, and Luce Fellow, SAR This talk will explore the entwined relationships and mutually beneficial growth plans pursued by TEPCO and the Japan Football Association since the 1990s, against the backdrop of a longer twentieth-century history of corporate-sport relations in Japan, and in light of the popular media’s story of the women’s soccer team’s victory and its ability to “heal a nation.”
March 2013
Alex Blanchette Colloquium
Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Runt, Or the Making and Unmaking of the American Meat Pig Alex Blanchette, PhD Candidate, University of Chicago and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Environmental Studies, Tufts University (starting in 2013), and Weatherhead Fellow, SAR Through an analysis of labor and human-animal relations in the farrowing node of a factory farm—the segment where the pigs are born—this presentation develops a way to think about the constellations of politics and value embedded in the standardized meat pig as a (unique) type of industrial being.
Things Unseen: Specters of Colonialism, Visual Culture, and US Colonial Mentorship of Japan in 1860 Colloquium
Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Imprinted Ideas and Indigenous Futurisms: Thinking Beyond Hollywood’s Indians and Toward Visual Sovereignty via Imaginative Acts of Reclamation Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Lamon Fellow, SAR This presentation will further explain how what might seem like an unexpected turn in contemporary Native cultural production and filmmaking is actually the reclamation and articulation of “Indigenous Futurisms.”
Tour Narratives of Race, Place, and History: Expanding the Borders of America’s Black Towns Colloquium
Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Whites in Black Towns: Redesigning Race Relations in the Twenty-first Century Karla Slocum, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and NEH Fellow, SAR This presentation will address debates about the small yet growing settlement of Whites in “All Black Towns,” as well as a variety of Black Town business ventures linking Whites and Blacks in collaboration, co-existence, or sometimes contestation.
February 2013
Ari Kelman Colloquium
Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Misplaced Massacre: Sand Creek in History and Memory Ari Kelman, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California, Davis Ari Kelman, a historian at UC Davis, will discuss the meaning and impact of the longstanding fight to shape and control memories of Sand Creek.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Empires of Love: Race, Sexuality, and the European-Asian Encounter Carmen Nocentelli, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of New Mexico Drawing on a range of literary and archival sources, Nocentelli argues that Europe's expansion into South and Southeast Asia contributed to the development of Western racial discourse while also shaping European ideals of marriage, erotic reciprocity, and monogamous affection.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Between Art and Artifact: Archaeological Replicas and Cultural Production in Oaxaca, Mexico Ronda Lynn Brulotte, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico Author and UNM anthropologist Ronda Brulotte will discuss her book Between Art and Artifact: Archaeological Replicas and Cultural Production in Oaxaca, Mexico (University of Texas Press 2012), which provides an ethnographic examination of the politics of heritage tourism and artisan production in southern Mexico.
January 2013
Schooling Mothers: Gendered Memories and Reflections of the Self Colloquium
Wednesday, January 30, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Children’s Schooling and the Pathways of Mothering Fibian Kavulani Lukalo, Senior Lecturer, Department of Communication and Media Studies, School of Human Resource Development, Moi University, and Campbell Resident Scholar, SAR In this presentation, Lukalo discusses findings of a life history study on factors that affected the education of mothers living in rural Kenya.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Finding the Calories: Family Economy, Crop Yields, and Population Increase from 250 CE to 800 CE in the Prehistoric Four Corners District David Stuart, Professor and Associate Provost Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico and Jenny Lund, Undergraduate Student, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico Stuart and Lund have completed a series of calculations to quantify the calories needed, acres of maize required, and costs of population increase for a family of eleven pit-house dwellers at about 250 CE.
December 2012
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Tour Narratives of Race, Place, and History: Expanding the Borders of America’s Black Towns Karla Slocum, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and NEH Fellow, SAR This presentation examines twenty-first century black town bus tour narratives, exploring how tour narrators present black towns against the grain.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, December 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Guided by Place Names: Field Methods for the Cartographic Expression of Indigenous Geographies Margaret Wickens Pearce, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Kansas, and Anne Ray Fellow, SAR This presentation introduces work to expand cartographic language for the expression of Indigenous geographies, from an overview of previous projects to present challenges to foster a cross-cultural cartographic dialogue on climate change experience and adaptation strategies in northern Tanzania.
Southwest Crossroads Map “Trails” Colloquium
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free How to Read a Map: Cartographic Language for Curious Creatives Margaret Wickens Pearce, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Kansas, and Anne Ray Fellow, SAR This workshop introduces the fundamentals of cartographic language for the curious mind. Like music, architecture, and dance, cartography is a kind of language with its own vocabulary, grammar, and genres. We’ll learn some basic building blocks and then use that knowledge to dismantle our preconceptions of what maps do, and to re-read some maps with new eyes.
November 2012
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Life and Paradoxical Leadership of Archaeologist William S. Webb Douglas W. Schwartz, President Emeritus and Senior Scholar, SAR To initiate the Depression-motivated Tennessee Valley Authority archaeology program, one of the world’s largest archaeological projects ever undertaken, a strong leader of this vast enterprise was required.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Advances and Questions on the Evolution of Childhood Advanced Seminar co-chairs Courtney L. Meehan, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington State University and Alyssa N. Crittenden, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California–San Diego Research into the evolution of childhood and the diversity of children’s experiences around the world has attracted attention in recent years, yet children remain peripheral in much of evolutionary, cultural, psychological, and archaeological research.
October 2012
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 31, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Gathering Dust: Producing Therapeutic Natures in Post-socialist Siberia Tatiana Chudakova, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This presentation traces the unruly assemblages of the “Buryat-Tibetan” pharmacon.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Schooling Mothers: Gendered Memories and Reflections of the Self Fibian Kuvalani Lukalo, Senior Lecturer, Department of Communication and Media Studies, School of Human Resource Development, Moi University, and Campbell Resident Scholar, SAR Focusing on an impoverished agricultural community in Bungoma District in Kenya, Fibian Lukalo’s research examines the relationship between mothering practices and the schooling of girls in poor rural communities....
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Politics of Life and Livelihood on the American Factory Farm Alex Blanchette, PhD Candidate, University of Chicago and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Environmental Studies, Tufts University (Starting in 2013), and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, SAR Alex Blanchette’s research explores the idea of the factory in the American factory farm, tracking this vexed concept as it is enlivened within the workplaces of some of the world’s largest pork corporations.
Elise M. Edwards Colloquium
Wednesday, October 10, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Fin de Millennium Football in Japan: A Sport and an Age for “Individuals” Elise Edwards, Associate Professor, Department of History and Anthropology, Butler University, and Luce Resident Scholar, SAR This talk will focus on the ways that coaches, journalists, and professional players experienced, imagined, and inscribed soccer as the sport that most aptly replicated the dynamics of globalization and most effectively trained citizens and workers for a new world economy.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Journeys to Others and Lessons of Self: Carlos Castaneda, Indigenismo, and the Politics of a New Age Ageeth Sluis, Associate Professor, Departments of History and Anthropology, Butler University, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR This study sheds light on how new conceptions of indigenous identity informed “New Age” tourism to Mexico.
September 2012
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 26, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Things Unseen: Specters of Colonialism, Visual Culture, and US Colonial Mentorship of Japan in 1860 Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR. Dr. Medak-Saltzman will present a framework she terms “specters of colonialism" and use it to analyze two widely circulated woodblock prints from 1860: one made in Japan about the US, and the other made in the US about Japan.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Beyond Snaketown: Property Rights and Corporate Group Formation in Hohokam Society Douglas B. Craig, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Northland Research, Inc. This presentation will provide a broad overview of Hohokam social organization and discuss new evidence for the emergence of large, land-holding corporate groups with inheritable property rights.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 12, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Cross-Cultural Approaches to Apprenticing in Western North America Jeanne Arnold, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR The Island Chumash of California’s Channel Islands were engaged in North America’s most intensive shell-working crafts from the AD 1100s–1800s.
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Introductory Presentations by 2012–2013 Resident Fellows
August 2012
Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann Colloquium
Wednesday, August 1, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Selling the Exotic to the Exotic: Islamic Talismans in Nineteenth-Century Asante, Ghana Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, and Cotsen Fellow, SAR During the nineteenth century, Islamic talismans traveled the camel caravan trade routes across sub-Saharan Africa, circulating widely amongst the non-Muslim Asante.
July 2012
Christopher Ball Colloquium
Wednesday, July 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Ritual Transformations: Healing, Development, and Culture Show in an Amazonian Society Christopher Ball, McKennan Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College, and Christopher Smeall Fellow, SAR This presentation addresses two abiding themes in cultural anthropology—the power of ritual to transform states of affairs in the social world, and changes in the meanings and functions of specific rituals under the effects of a globalized politics of identity.
Sharon N. DeWitte Colloquium
Wednesday, July 18, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Demographic Effects of Medieval Plague: Longevity and Health in Post-Black Death London Sharon N. DeWitte, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South Carolina, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Using data from medieval London cemeteries, this presentation investigates the demographic and health effects of the fourteenth-century Black Death, one of the most devastating epidemics in human history and one which targeted relatively frail people.
Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr. Colloquium
Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Red, Black, and Brown: Indian Schools and Black Educators after Brown v. Board of Education Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr., Ph.D. Candidate, Department of American Studies and African American Studies, Yale University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR In the wake of “massive resistance” to the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown decision, hundreds of African Americans migrated to Indian country to work as teachers in reservation schools.
Locust Tree in Bloom, Spring 2012 Colloquium
Thursday, July 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Bog and the Beast, The Engraver and the Priest: Museums, the Nation, and the World Peggy Levitt, Professor, Department of Sociology, Wellesley College, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Ever since the leaders of the new French Republic opened the doors of the Louvre to the French public, museums have strongly influenced how people imagine the nations where they live.
June 2012
Lawrence Rosen Colloquium
Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Romancing the Tribe: The History of an Anthropological Problem Lawrence Rosen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Princeton University, and William Y. and Nettie K. Adams Fellow, SAR The presentation will trace the history of the anthropological “romance of the tribe” not only for its impact on the discipline itself but how, as views of the tribe have changed, so have our views of humankind and the policies applied by Western nations in many parts of the world.
Nancy Owen Lewis Colloquium
Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Selling Health in New Mexico: Bringing the Sick to the Land of the Well Nancy Owen Lewis, SAR Scholar-in-Residence and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow During New Mexico’s struggle for statehood, territorial officials promoted its climate as ideal for curing tuberculosis, the leading cause of death in America. As proof, they cited the absence of disease among its native people. This presentation examines the factors that shaped the health seeker movement from 1880–1900—and its unintended consequences.
May 2012
Nancy Marie Mithlo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Orality and the Native Image Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The repatriation of historic photographs to original source communities often elicits oral responses as memory and imagination are animated.
Malena Mörling Colloquium
Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Poetry Reading Malena Mörling, Research Associate, SAR Malena Mörling is the author of two collection of poetry, Ocean Avenue and Astoria as well as several translations. She will read her poems as well as translations of the pioneering, Finnish-Swedish modernist, Edith Södergran.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations SAR Anne Ray Interns Kelsey Potdevin and Jennifer McCarty Gatekeepers and Traders in Alaska’s Northwest Interior 1800–1870 and Inupiat Ilitqusiat: Those Things that Make Us Who We Are
Teresa McCarty Colloquium
Wednesday, May 2, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Genealogies of Language Loss and Recovery: A Closer Look at Language in the Lives of Native American Youth Teresa L. McCarty, AW Snell Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar This presentation takes a closer look at the ways in which explicit and implicit policies about language are constructed intergenerationally in contexts of linguistic and cultural oppression, and how those policies take shape in indigenous young people’s lives.
April 2012
Aimee V. Garza Colloquium
Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Migration and the Politics of Religious Revivalism in New Mexico Aimee V. Garza, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR The Catholic Charismatic Renewal or renovación carismática is a religious revitalization movement that is sweeping northern Mexico, growing in popularity with Mexican migrants residing in the United States, and changing what it means to be Catholic on both sides of the border.
Margaret M. Bruchac Colloquium
Wednesday, April 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Keen Eyes: Recovering Bertha Parker's Lost Contributions to Indigenous Archaeology Margaret M. Bruchac, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR This research is excerpted from a book manuscript that critically examines and reconceptualizes relations among American anthropologists and indigenous informants.
Craig R. Janes Colloquium
Wednesday, April 4, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mining Mongolia: Reflections on the “Resource Curse,” Poverty, and Applied Anthropology in the Asian El Dorado Craig R. Janes, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University and Henry Luce Foundation Resident Scholar, SAR Dr. Janes will reflect on the emergence and exacerbation of poverty and rural underdevelopment in the face of vast mineral wealth, and discuss efforts to address the social and health impacts of mining and related development activities.
March 2012
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Disturbing Bodies: The Politics and Practice of Forensic Exhumation Advanced Seminar co-chairs Zoë Crossland, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University; and Rosemary Joyce, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley What values and beliefs underlie the burgeoning practice of forensic exhumation—re-excavating human remains to address questions of justice?
Nicole Taylor Colloquium
Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Obesity and Body Image Concerns among High School Teens Nicole Taylor, Director, Scholar Programs, SAR Popular obesity discourses in the US have constructed a perceptual reality wherein it seems as though no one is safe from becoming fat.
Frédérique Apffel-Marglin Colloquium
Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Subversive Spiritualties: How Rituals Enact the World Frédérique Apffel-Marglin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, Smith College Apffel-Marglin draws on Bohrian quantum physics and critical science studies, as well as empirical data from archaeology, geography, ethnobotany, and anthropology, to argue that there is no pre-given nature as the back-drop to human action.
February 2012
Doorway in Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon Colloquium
Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Chaco and Cahuachi: A Tale of Two Pilgrimage Centers John Kantner, Vice President for Academic & Institutional Advancement Comparative archaeological investigation of Chaco Canyon in the US Southwest and Cahuachi on the south coast of Peru is providing insights into how large pilgrimage centers develop.
Julie M. Weise Colloquium
Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Migration and its Discontents in the U.S. South Since 1960 Julie Weise, Assistant Professor, International Studies Program, California State University, Long Beach and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation discusses the Mexican agricultural workers who moved to rural Georgia in the 1960s–1980s, and goes on to explain Mexican migration to greater Charlotte, North Carolina since 1990.
John Martin Colloquium
Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Why More Boys than Girls—Or More Girls than Boys?: New Findings on Human Sex Ratio Variation at Birth John Martin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University and Visiting Research Associate; and Paul Wren, Senior Principle Engineer, Performance Software Corporation, Phoenix, AZ, and Co-Founder and Administrator of Open Anthropology Cooperative Why is the ratio of male to female births among women who do not live with other women of fertile age higher than it is with women who do?
Southwest Crossroads Map “Trails” Colloquium
Wednesday, February 8, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Coronado Expedition, Discoveries Since 1992 Richard and Shirley Flint, Research Associates, Archaeology Southwest NPS concluded that insufficient information existed about the route followed by the Coronado expedition. Subsequently, a major campsite of the Coronado expedition was located in Texas.
Aimee V. Garza Colloquium
Wednesday, February 1, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A State for Sanctuary: The Curious Life of a Controversial Proclamation Aimee V. Garza, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California Santa Cruz and SAR Visiting Research Associate This lecture uncovers the untold history of the Sanctuary Movement in New Mexico during the 1980s.
January 2012
President's Garden in Winter Colloquium
Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Federal Indian Service and Intertribal Identity at the Turn of the 20th Century Cathleen Cahill, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of New Mexico Cathleen Cahill will discuss her recently published book, Federal Fathers and Mothers: A Social History of the US Indian Service.
Wossen Argaw Tegegn Colloquium
Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Unpacking Gendered Institutional Norms: Who Holds the Mouse? Why? Wossen Argaw Tegegn, Research Scholar, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna, and Campbell Resident Scholar This presentation questions the often unquestioned norms whereby men control equipment such as the mouse in computer science labs, the theodolite in surveying technology field sessions, and the voltmeter in electrical engineering workshops.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Evolution of the Human Family Laura Fortunato, 2011 Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute This talk presents recent advances in the application of evolutionary thinking to the study of the human family, focusing on the evolution of marriage and inheritance strategies.
December 2011
Kitty King Corbett Colloquium
Wednesday, December 14, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reframing Global Health in the Context of Environmental Crisis Kitty Corbett, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Human communities are facing unprecedented threats from natural resource depletion, extinctions, pollution, overpopulation, and climate change.
Nancy Marie Mithlo Colloquium
Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reading the Image: The Photography of Horace Poolaw in Context Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar Kiowa photographer Horace Poolaw (1906–1984) documented the vibrancy of the southern Plains communities near Anadarko, Oklahoma with a keen sense of place and people.
November 2011
Julie M. Weise Colloquium
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Corazón de Dixie: Migration and the Struggle for Rights in the U.S. South and Mexico, 1910–2010 Julie Weise, Assistant Professor, International Studies Program, California State University, Long Beach, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation chronicles the vibrant transnational world of Mexican migrants in the U.S.
Craig R. Janes Colloquium
Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Perfect Storm: Climate Change and Liberal Economic Development in Mongolia Craig Janes, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, and Henry Luce Resident Scholar This presentation examines how Mongolia’s transition from Soviet-style socialism to an unregulated free-market economy has affected the productivity and sustainability of agriculture and livestock herding.
October 2011
Teresa L. McCarty Colloquium
Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Indigenous Youth and Language Survival Teresa L. McCarty, Snell Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar Research with Native American communities undergoing rapid heritage-language loss.
Wossen Argaw Tegegn Colloquium
Wednesday, October 19, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Fire on the Foot: A Case of Gender-Based Violence in a University Setting Wossen Argaw Tegegn, Research Scholar, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna, and Campbell Resident Scholar This presentation demonstrates how the culture of gender-based violence in a university setting is a function of the gendered power dynamics observed in the wider patriarchal society.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Biosecurity and Vulnerability Advanced Seminar co-chairs Lesley A. Sharp, Ann Whitney Olin Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, and Senior Research Scientist in Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; and Nancy N. Chen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz This presentation addresses the perilous embodied consequences associated with a recent proliferation in global security measures.
Margaret M. Bruchac Colloquium
Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Consorting with Savages: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists Margaret M. Bruchac, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar A series of case studies serve to illustrate how Native gatekeepers assisted and resisted the exchange of knowledge.
September 2011
A Tale of Two Traders: Bill Beaver and Mark Winter Colloquium
Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm A Tale of Two Traders: Bill Beaver and Mark Winter Susan Brown McGreevy, Humanities Scholar, Utah Museum of Natural History, and IARC Research Associate While many trading posts within the Navajo Nation have closed their doors, the stories of Beaver and Winter revisit the relationships between trader and artist within a framework of collecting, documenting, and artistic development.
Hemi Rau Colloquium
Wednesday, September 21, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Māori Learners Enjoying Success as Māori in Māori/English Language Programs Cath Rau, Hemi Rau, Paul Royal, Eleanor Eketone, Moana Salu, Robyn Hata-Gage, and Pihere Levi; New Zealand (Aotearoa) Practitioners working in two long-established heritage language programs in New Zealand will discuss the programs in their respective schools and share examples of Māori students enjoying success as Māori.
Linda C. Garro Colloquium
Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Health as a Family Matter: Health and Well-Being as Enacted in Dual-Earner Middle-Class Family Life in Los Angeles Linda C. Garro, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Most US health research relies on individuals as the unit of analysis.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, September 7, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations by the 2011–2012 SAR Resident Fellows
August 2011
Joan Jensen Colloquium
Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Historiography and Anthropology: The Case of Frances Densmore Joan M. Jensen, Professor Emerita, Department of History, New Mexico State University, and Adams Summer Scholar This presentation sheds new light on the work of anthropologist Frances Densmore.
July 2011
Ufuk Serin Colloquium
Wednesday, July 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late Antique and Byzantine Monuments and the Topography of Southern Caria in the Light of New Archaeological Evidence Ufuk Serin, Guest Scholar, Department of Architecture, Middle East University, Turkey, and Cotsen Summer Scholar This presentation examines the archaeology, history, and art history of Late Antique and Byzantine monuments in Southern Caria, Turkey.
Sascha Scott Colloquium
Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Awa Tsireh’s Paintings of Koshare and the Politics of Preservation Sascha Scott, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Music Histories, Syracuse University, and Bunting Summer Scholar Analysis of the paintings by Awa Tsireh of San Ildefonso illuminates the Pueblos’ role in the political and cultural debates of the 1920s.
Edmundo Cruz Luna Colloquium
Wednesday, July 13, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Complexities of Negotiating Cultural and Linguistic Identities Online—in Balinese Edmundo Cruz Luna, Instructor, Department of English Education, Mokpo National University, South Korea, and Smeall Summer Scholar This presentation addresses how native Balinese speakers develop and present their cultural and linguistic identities in online forums.
Jennifer Shannon Colloquium
Wednesday, July 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Writing an Ethnography of “Our Lives”: Collaborative Exhibit Making at the National Museum of the American Indian Jennifer Shannon, Assistant Professor and Curator, Department of Anthropology and Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Bunting Summer Scholar The predicaments and rewards resulting from the commitment by the National Museum of the American Indian to collaborate with Native peoples.
June 2011
Joanna Brooks Colloquium
Wednesday, June 29, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Why We Left: A Literary Archaeology of Anglo-American Colonialism Joanna Brooks, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of English and Comparative Literature, San Diego State University, and Bunting Summer Scholar During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, thousands of peasants left England for North America.
May 2011
Catherine M. Cameron Colloquium
Wednesday, May 18, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Captives: Invisible Agents of Culture Change Catherine M. Cameron, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation explores the role of captives in captor society, how they affected captor social boundaries, and their potential impact on culture change.
Melissa K. Nelson Colloquium
Wednesday, May 11, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Indigenous Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Persistence in Place Melissa K. Nelson, Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar This presentation explores the philosophies, methods, and practices of Indigenous science as articulated by Native scholars, leaders, and traditional practitioners.
Doug Kiel Colloquium
Wednesday, May 4, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Rethinking the Urban/Reservation Relationship in American Indian History Doug Kiel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar A growing body of scholarly literature has examined urban Indian experiences and 20th century reservation histories, but little attention has been devoted to the connections between urban and reservation communities.
April 2011
Teresa Montoya Colloquium
Wednesday, April 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Woven Kin: Exploring Representation and Collaboration in Navajo Weaving Teresa Montoya (Diné), M.A. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Denver, and Anne Ray Native Intern This presentation explores the relationship between representational strategies and the employment of critical indigenous methodologies in the display of Navajo weavings in both Native and non-Native museums.
Sarah K. Croucher Colloquium
Wednesday, April 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Capitalism and Cloves: A Critique of Historical Archaeology Sarah K. Croucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wesleyan University, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar Working on historical archaeology in Eastern Africa raises questions as to how the narrative of Islamic plantations might be written into a global historical archaeology. This talk addresses the potential for changing taken-for-granted narratives in this field by writing Zanzibar back in to the archaeology of the modern world.
The 9/11 Generation: Young Muslims in the New World Order Colloquium
Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm The 9/11 Generation: Young Muslims in the New World Order Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Adeline Masquelier, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, and Benjamin F. Soares, Senior Research Fellow, African Studies Center, Leiden The traumatic events of September 11, 2001 have shaped the consciousness of a new global generation. What it means to be young and Muslim has changed. Coming of age in a Muslim majority society or as a Muslim minority in America and Europe is described by the co-chairs of this SAR seminar.
March 2011
Gloria Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Voyageur Re-presentations and Complications: Frances Anne Hopkins and the Métis Nation of Ontario Gloria Bell (Métis), M.A. in Art History, Carleton University, and Anne Ray Native Intern People of Native (Cree, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee) and European (English, French, Irish, Scottish) descent, métis, were employed as voyageurs in the fur-trade since the early eighteenth century in the Great Lakes area, yet their voices are absent in the historical records and their bodies and lifestyle are often represented as “other.”
Street Economies, Politics, and Social Movements in the Urban Global South Colloquium
Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Street Economies, Politics, and Social Movements in the Urban Global South Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Walter E. Little, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Albany, State University of New York; Karen Tranberg Hansen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University; and B. Lynne Milgram, Professor of Anthropology, Faculty of Liberal Studies, Ontario College of Art and Design
Resident Scholar Dean Falk Colloquium
Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Evolution and Asperger’s Syndrome: Is There a Connection? Dean Falk, SAR Senior Scholar and Hale G. Professor, Department of Anthropology, Florida State University
February 2011
Jamila Bargach Colloquium
Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Unwed Mothers in Morocco: Between Social Damnation and (Possible) Legal Redemption Jamila Bargach, Academic Director, Foundation SiHmad Derhem for the Development of the South and the Sahara, and Campbell Resident Scholar
“Hano Pueblo, Hopi, Arizona, ca. 1890” Colloquium
Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Ethnogenesis and Human Diversity: The Tewa Case Scott G. Ortman, Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute, and Lightfoot Fellow, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center
Comic Books for Big Girls: Uchida Shungiku and the Realm of the Dollhouse Colloquium
Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Comic Books for Big Girls: Uchida Shungiku and the Realm of the Dollhouse Eve Zimmerman, Associate Professor of Japanese, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Wellesley College
January 2011
Jessica Rheann Metcalfe Colloquium
Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Native Designers of High Fashion: Expressing Identity, Creativity, and Tradition in Contemporary Clothing Design Jessica R. Metcalfe, Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Office for Equity and Inclusion, Department of Anthropology and Native Studies, University of New Mexico
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late to Terminal Classic Ritual Transitions at the Ancient Maya City of El Perú-Waká, Petén, Guatemala: A View from Structure M13-1 Olivia C. Navarro-Farr, Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Office for Equity and Inclusion, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico
December 2010
Lucas Bessire Colloquium
Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Culture Against Life: Bodily Affliction, Transnational Governance, and the Limits of the Human in the Gran Chaco Lucas Bessire, Postdoctoral Fellow, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowship Program, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Melissa K. Nelson Colloquium
Wednesday, December 8, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Still Singing: The Eco-Cultural Revitalization of the Southern Paiute Salt Song Trail Melissa K. Nelson, Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
Sarah K. Croucher Colloquium
Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Making Local Identities: Ceramic Production in 19th-Century Eastern Africa Sarah K. Croucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wesleyan University, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
November 2010
Catherine M. Cameron Colloquium
Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Captives and the Creation of Power Catherine M. Cameron, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Doug Kiel Colloquium
Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Dreams Deferred: Competing Visions for Social Change on the Oneida Reservation Doug Kiel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
October 2010
Stephen H. Lekson Colloquium
Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Scalar Thresholds in the Ancient Southwest: Density and Distance Stephen H. Lekson, Curator and Professor, Museum of Natural History and Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Visiting Research Associate
Abstract Landscapes and Social Visions: Reading Southwestern Photobooks Colloquium
Wednesday, October 20, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Abstract Landscapes and Social Visions: Reading Southwestern Photobooks Audrey Goodman, Associate Professor of English, Georgia State University
Jamila Bargach Colloquium
Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Harvesting Fog: Introducing a Multi-faceted Problem Jamila Bargach, Academic Director, Foundation SiHmad Derhem for the Development of the South and the Sahara, and Campbell Resident Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 6, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm A Drummer Listens to the World Nii Otoo Annan, Percussion Master, Ghana, and Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, University of New Mexico
September 2010
Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic Collections Colloquium
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic Collections Advanced seminar chairs Sarah Byrne, University of London; Annie Clarke, University of Sydney; Rodney Harrison, Open University; and Robin Torrence, Australian Museum Museum collections are established through a complex series of interactions in which indigenous peoples play a key role. The preliminary results of current research are discussed.
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, September 22, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Pilgrims Drawn to Sacred Power: Santiago de Compostela Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar, SAR Who and why are pilgrims and what occurs during their journeys? After a general introduction, a detailed look follows at one major pilgrimage that has continued for a thousand years to Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain.
Ernestine S. Elster Colloquium
Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Scaloria Cave: Found, Lost and Found Again Ernestine Elster, Research Associate, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Neolithic underground ritual is examined in this presentation on Scaloria Cave in Italy, a site discovered in the 1930s, but subsequently lost and found. The relationship between the cave and the Neolithic villages on the Tavoliere Plain is discussed.
2010–2011 Resident Scholars Colloquium
Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations by 2010–2011 SAR Resident Fellows
August 2010
Zoë Wool Colloquium
Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Vital Signs and Möbius Time: Frayed Ordinaries at Walter Reed Zoë H. Wool, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto and Bunting Summer Scholar
July 2010
Poornima Paidipaty Colloquium
Wednesday, July 28, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Making Space/Making Race: Tribal Anthropology and the Colonial Frontier in 19th Century British India Poornima L. Paidipaty, Collegiate Assistant Professor and Harper-Schmidt Fellow, Society of Fellows, University of Chicago, and Adams Summer Scholar
Jason Pribilsky Colloquium
Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Culture’s Laboratory: Scientific Imagination, Andean Peasants, and the Making of the Cornell-Peru Project at Vicos Jason C. Pribilsky, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Whitman College, and Adams Summer Scholar
Cecilia Ballí Colloquium
Wednesday, July 14, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Fence and the River: Border Enforcement in the Age of National Security Cecilia Ballí, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, and Bunting Summer Scholar
Minette C. Church Colloquium
Wednesday, July 7, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Childhood, Materiality, and Identity in the Contested Landscapes of Southern Colorado Minette C. Church, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Cotsen Summer Scholar
June 2010
Erin Debenport Colloquium
Wednesday, June 30, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Literacy, Perfectibility, and Temporality: Reconciling Pueblo Imagined Pasts and Futures Erin Debenport, ACLS/Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Language, Interaction, and Culture, University of California, Los Angeles, and Smeall Summer Scholar
Daniel Usner Jr. Colloquium
Wednesday, June 23, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Chitimacha Indian Basketmakers and their Patrons: 1890-1940 Daniel H. Usner, Jr., Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University, and Bunting Summer Scholar
Katherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance: Theory, Experiment and Social Engagement Colloquium
Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Katherine Dunham and the Anthropology of Dance Advanced Seminar Chair Elizabeth Chin, Professor, Critical Theory and Social Justice, Occidental College
May 2010
Sherry Farrell Racette Colloquium
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Break and Enter: Indigenous Research in the Houses of History Sherry Farrell Racette, Associate Professor, Department of Native Studies, University of Manitoba, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
Indigenous Peoples and Salmon in the Northern Pacific Colloquium
Wednesday, May 19, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Indigenous Peoples and Salmon in the Northern Pacific Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Benedict J. Colombi, Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Program, University of Arizona, and James F. Brooks, President, SAR
Charles L. Briggs Colloquium
Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Texture of Death: Three Stories from a Mysterious Epidemic Charles L. Briggs, Alan Dundes Distinguished Professor of Folklore and Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of California–Berkeley, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar; and Clara Mantini-Briggs, Visiting Professor, Ethnic Studies Department, University of California–San Diego, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Rethinking Race and Science: Biology, Genes, and Culture Colloquium
Wednesday, May 5, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Rethinking Race and Science: Biology, Genes, and Culture Advanced Seminar Chair John Hartigan, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas–Austin
April 2010
Ninja Turtle figure Colloquium
Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Presentations by 2009–2010 IARC Interns Dominic J. Henry (Diné), Anne Ray Native Intern and M.A. Candidate, Museum Studies, University of Oklahoma and Kendall Tallmadge (Ho-Chunk), Harvey W. Branigar Jr. Native Intern and Museum Consultant, Ho-Chunk Nation
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 21, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Illness, Death, and Loss in New England, 1840–1916: The Role of Tuberculosis Alan C. Swedlund, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and External Professor, Santa Fe Institute
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Splendor in the Jungle: The Rise and Fall of Ankor Wat Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research
Christopher B. Teuton Colloquium
Wednesday, April 7, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Standing in the Doorway: Teachings and Stories of the Turtle Island Liars’ Club Christopher B. Teuton, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Denver, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
March 2010
James Trostle Colloquium
Wednesday, March 31, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Ethnography of a Bus Ride in Northern Coastal Ecuador James A. Trostle, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Trinity College, Hartford, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
The Difference Kinship Makes: Rethinking the Ideologies of Modernity Colloquium
Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Difference Kinship Makes: Rethinking the Ideologies of Modernity Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs Susan McKinnon, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Virginia, and Fenella Cannell, Reader, Department of Social Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science
Lynn M. Morgan Colloquium
Wednesday, March 17, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Claiming Rosa Parks: Debates over Health and Human Rights in Latin America Lynn M. Morgan, Mary E. Woolley Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mount Holyoke College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, March 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, University of New Mexico
February 2010
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 17, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm One Revolt, Two Revolts, Three Revolts, More? Cycles of Religious Evangelism and Popular Response in the Puebloan Southwest James F. Brooks, President, School for Advanced Research
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm History and Memories of Colonialism in A.C. Jordan’s Novel, “The Wrath of the Ancestors” Nicholas M. Creary, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Ohio University
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Anthropology, Human Capabilities, and Occupational Justice Gelya Frank, Professor, Department of Anthropology and Division of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California
January 2010
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Poetry Reading Malena Mörling, Associate Professor, Department of Creative Writing, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 13, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Creation of Pueblo Art Pottery and the Santa Fe Indian Market Bruce Bernstein, Executive Director, Southwestern Association for Indian Arts
December 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, December 9, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Homeschooling the Enchanted Child: Ambivalent Attachments in the Domestic Southwest Rebecca A. Allahyari, SAR Research Associate
November 2009
Clara Mantini-Briggs Colloquium
Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Chronic Cultural Impossibility: A Physician’s Reflections on How an Anthropological Concept is Used in Legitimizing Injustice Clara Mantini-Briggs, Visiting Professor, Ethnic Studies Department, University of California, San Diego; Visiting Scholar, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley; and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Christopher B. Teuton Colloquium
Wednesday, November 11, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Cherokee Stories of the Turtle Island Liars’ Club: Narrative, Community, and Cultural Revival Christopher B. Teuton, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Denver, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
James Trostle Colloquium
Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Do Roads Lead to Wellness? Development and Disease in Coastal Ecuador James A. Trostle, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Trinity College, Hartford, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
October 2009
Lynn M. Morgan Colloquium
Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Reproductive Rights and Wrongs in Contemporary Latin America Lynn M. Morgan, Mary E. Woolley Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mount Holyoke College, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm On Vampire Bats and a Mysterious Epidemic: Indigenous Leadership, Medicine, Anthropology, and Death in the Rainforest Charles L. Briggs, Alan Dundes Distinguished Professor of Folklore and Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar, and Clara Mantini-Briggs, Visiting Scholar, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Sherry Farrell Racette Colloquium
Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Coat Stories: Reclaiming Knowledge and Narratives from Material Culture Sherry Farrell Racette, Associate Professor, Department of Native Studies and Women & Gender Studies, University of Manitoba, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
September 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Toward a Global Human History: Agency and the Explanation of Long-Term Change Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs John E. Robb, Senior Lecturer, Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University, and Timothy Pauketat, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm The Origins of the Great Pueblos: New Advances from Research at Arroyo Hondo Pueblo Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar and President Emeritus, School for Advanced Research
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Clash of Titans: The Inca Emperor Atahualpa and the Spanish Conquistador Pizarro Charles Stanish, Director, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations 2009–2010 SAR Resident Fellows
August 2009
Advanced Seminar: Nature, Science, and Religion Colloquium
Wednesday, August 19, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Nature, Science, and Religion: Intersections Shaping Society and the Environment Advanced Seminar Chair Catherine M. Tucker, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Buddha and the Bees: Recursive Innovations and Community Self-Fashioning among Sri Lankan Potters Deborah Winslow, Cultural Anthropology Program Director and Ecology of Infectious Disease Program Co-Director, Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, National Science Foundation; SAR Visiting Research Associate
July 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm After the Fall: Iron Age Political and Economic Dynamics in Central Anatolia Peter Grave, Convenor, Department of Archaeology and Paleoanthropology, University of New England, and Lisa Kealhofer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Santa Clara University; Cotsen Summer Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Navigating Archives and Special Collections Libraries for Native American Research Ann Massmann, Associate Professor, Center for Southwest Research, University of New Mexico; Bunting Summer Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm When Researchers Meet the Researched: Interpretations of Proper Exchange in International AIDS Research in Rural Malawi Crystal Biruk, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania; Bunting Summer Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Aleš Hrdlička and the Anthropology of the Unwanted J. Andrew Darling, Director, Cultural Resource Management Program, Gila River Indian Community; Adams Summer Scholar
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Quelling Anguish: A Political Economy of Emotions in the Everyday Life of Youth Heads of Household in Kigali, Rwanda Maggie Zraly, NSF International Research Fellow, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, National University of Rwanda; Bunting Summer Scholar
June 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, June 24, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm The Spatio-temporal Effects of Enclosing Palestine Julie Peteet, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Louisville; Bunting Summer Scholar
May 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Ancient Religion from the Ground Up Timothy R. Pauketat, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Resident Scholar Dean Falk Colloquium
Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm From Piltdown Man to Hobbit: Of Missing Links and Paleopolitics Dean Falk, Hale G. Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, and SAR Resident Fellow
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, May 6, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Markets and Moralities Advanced Seminar Co-Chairs: Edward F. Fischer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, and Peter Benson, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington University
April 2009
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 29, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Intention, Enchantment, and the Aesthetics of Renewal in the Art of the Prehistoric Southwest Marit Munson, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Trent University, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Redefining the “Normal” in Women’s Health: The View from Evolutionary Medicine Wenda Trevathan, Regents Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, New Mexico State University, and SAR Resident Fellow
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 12:00–1:00 pm Violence in the Digital Age: Youth and Spectacular Performance in the Sierra Leone and Liberia Wars Daniel J. Hoffman, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
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