Kelley Hays-Gilpin

2015, October 18–22
Puebloan Societies: New Perspectives Across the SubfieldsAdvanced SeminarPuebloan Societies: New Perspectives Across the SubfieldsThis seminar’s purpose was to address Puebloan social formations of the past and present from a variety of comparative perspectives using a four-field anthropological approach, and to reconnect the currently disjointed anthropological sub-fields, especially archaeology and ethnology, and to develop new perspectives on Puebloan social societies.
2014
Living The Ancient SouthwestSAR Press PublicationLiving the Ancient Southwest

How did Southwestern peoples make a living in the vast arid reaches of the Great Basin? When and why did violence erupt in the Mesa Verde region? Who were the Fremont people? How do some Hopis view Chaco Canyon? These are just a few of the topics addressed in Living the Ancient Southwest.

2013
Reassembling the CollectionSAR Press PublicationReassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous AgencyReassembling the Collection presents innovative approaches to the study of historical and contemporary engagements between museums and the various individuals and communities who were (and are) involved in their production and consumption.
2012
Hisat'sinomSAR Press PublicationHisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without WaterThe national monuments of Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, and Montezuma’s Castle showcase the treasures of the first people who settled and developed farms, towns, and trade routes throughout northern Arizona and beyond. The Hopis call these ancient peoples “Hisat’sinom,” and Spanish explorers named their hard, arid homeland the sierra sin agua, mountains without water. Indeed, much of the region receives less annual precipitation than the quintessential desert city of Tucson. In Hisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold.
2010
Mimbres Lives and LandscapesSAR Press PublicationMimbres Lives and LandscapesThe well-illustrated essays in this book offer the latest archaeological research on the ancient Mimbres to explain what we know and what questions still remain about men's and women's lives, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of the dramatic pottery designs.
2010, September 26–30
Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic CollectionsAdvanced SeminarReassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic CollectionsThe aim of this seminar was to re-configure how Indigenous agency and identity are we conceptualized and interpreted within the formation of ethnographic collection
2004, May 11–12
Short SeminarPottery MoundIn May, Museum of New Mexico, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture research associate Polly Schaafsma convened a two-day seminar about the site of Pottery Mound, an early Pueblo IV site of approximately 500 rooms located on the Rio Puerco west of Los Lunas, New Mexico.
2001
Women & Men in the Prehispanic SouthwestSAR Press PublicationWomen & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest: Labor, Power, and PrestigeWomen & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige.
1997, March 2–6
Advanced SeminarSex Roles and Gender Hierarchies in Middle Range Societies: Engendering Southwestern PrehistoryThe prehistoric American Southwest presents an ideal case for investigating gender issues. This advanced seminar was the first comprehensive attempt to examine the record of this region in terms of gender.


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