Kay B. Warren

2005, March 6–10
Advanced SeminarToward an Anthropology of DemocracyFunded in part by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc., the seminar set out to “deepen understanding, reconfigure frameworks, and rewrite the terms of debate” by encouraging scholars to examine the forms democracy takes as it emerges around the world. Through research in Peru, Ecuador, Mozambique, Japan, Guatemala, India, and the U.S., participants focused on how freedom, rights, popular sovereignty, citizenship, rule of law, and political equality are received and executed where cultural roots of these ideas often predate any formal introduction of democracy.
2002, April 28–May 2
Advanced SeminarCulture and Conflict: The Poetics of Violent Practice“Culture and Conflict: The Poetics of Violent Practice,” took place April 28-May 2, 2002. Two discussants joined the eight participants whose papers examined violent practice in a range of cultures including those of West Africa, the Khmer Rouge, Rwanda, the Basque region of Spain, and the United States. Neil Whitehead, who chaired the seminar, described the purpose of the seminar as “seeking an understanding of violence as a cultural expression.”
2001
History in PersonSAR Press PublicationHistory in Person: Enduring Struggles, Contentious Practice, Intimate IdentitiesExtended conflict situations in Northern Ireland or South Africa, the local effects of the rise of multinational corporations, and conflicts in workplaces, households, and academic fields are all crucibles for the forging of identities. In this volume, the authors bring their research to bear on enduring struggles and the practices of identity within those struggles. This collection of essays explores the innermost, generative aspects of subjects as social, cultural, and historical beings and raises serious questions about long-term conflicts and sustained identities in the world today.
2000, October 22–26
Advanced SeminarCulture Theory and Cross-Cultural Comparison: Maya Culture and History in a Multicultural WorldParticipants in the seminar included four scholars of Guatemala, including a prominent Maya scholar-activist, three specialists on Chiapas, and two on the Yucatan. Together they spanned anthropological inquiry in the region from the 1950s to the present. With expertise ranging from Maya linguistics, ritual, and religion, to economics, politics, and history, all participants were fully grounded in long-term, linguistically-informed ethnographic research.
1995, October 8–12
Advanced SeminarHistory in Person: The Mutual Constitution of Endemic Struggles and Enduring IdentitiesAll over the world there are places where social relations and the persons situated in them are disputed, unsettled, unresolved, "unfinished." This seminar examined the relationships between these enduring social struggles and the identities that are forged in them.
1995
Other IntentionsSAR Press PublicationOther Intentions: Cultural Contexts and the Attribution of Inner StatesThe authors argue that although intentionality might appear to be a wholly abstract phenomenon, it is deeply entwined with the nature and distribution of power, the portrayal of events, the assessment of personhood, the interplay of trust and deception, and the assessment of moral and legal responsibility.


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