Jeremy A. Sabloff

2005–2009
Board of DirectorsMember
2009, January 15–17
IHOPE–Maya: Tropical Sustainability from an Ancient ContextShort SeminarIHOPE–Maya: Tropical Sustainability from an Ancient ContextTen archaeologists interested in semitropical ecosystems and working primarily in the Maya Lowlands gathered to discuss what their data sets can tell us about the impact that early civilization had on the biophysical environment, as well as how such information can grant useful knowledge to humans living on an overexploited planet today.
2008
The Ancient CitySAR Press PublicationThe Ancient City: New Perspectives on Urbanism in the Old and New WorldCities are so common today that we cannot imagine a world without them. More than half of the world's population lives in cities, and that proportion is growing. Yet for most of our history, there were no cities. Why, how, and when did urban life begin?
2005
A Catalyst for IdeasSAR Press PublicationA Catalyst for Ideas: Anthropological Archaeology and the Legacy of Douglas W. SchwartzIn his thirty-four years as president of the School of American Research, Douglas W. Schwartz's far-reaching vision placed SAR on the intellectual edge of research about humans across the globe. Nowhere is this more evident than in his influence on the field of anthropological archaeology.
2004
Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Summer ScholarThe Relevance of Archaeology in the Modern World
2003
TikalSAR Press PublicationTikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, & Affairs of State: Advancing Maya ArchaeologyNew insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal's rulers.
2000, October 15–16
Short SeminarChallenges and Problems Facing University-Based Museums in the New CenturyThe SAR-sponsored session, organized by Jeremy Sabloff, director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, provided an opportunity for participants to compare issues and discuss possible solutions to the many complex questions facing museums now and in the years ahead.
1999, September 26–30
Advanced SeminarChanging Perspectives on Tikal and the Development of Ancient Maya CivilizationThe Advanced Seminar participants included eight scholars who worked at Tikal during the 1950s and 1960s. Of particular value was the sharing of new information about Tikal that has emerged since the close of the fieldwork there. Thirty years represents a relatively short a period of time, but, said seminar chair Jeremy Sabloff, “for Maya studies, it is like an eternity.”
1986
Late Lowland Maya CivilizationSAR Press PublicationLate Lowland Maya Civilization: Classic to Postclassic

In light of new and expanding research, the contributors to this volume premise that the relationship of Classic to Postclassic in the Northern and Southern Maya Lowlands is much more complex than was traditionally thought. The essays offer a useful introduction to current thought regarding the development of Lowland Maya civilization after the collapse of the Classic Period in the South.

1982, October 18–22
Advanced SeminarAfter the Fall: New Perspectives on the Postclassic Period in the Maya Lowlands
1981
Simulations in ArchaeologySAR Press PublicationSimulations in Archaeology

This book aims to clarify the reasons for using systems models and computer simulations in seeking to understand dynamic cultural patterns. Computer simulations grow logically out of the steps taken by archaeology in the past century: from random data collection to cultural description, proceeding through chronological ordering to interest in process, and finally to systems construction.

1978, October 9–13
Advanced SeminarThe Use of Systems Models and Computer Simulations in the Study of Complex Societies: Future Trends in Archaeological Research
1975
Ancient Civilization and TradeSAR Press PublicationAncient Civilization and Trade

The contributors to this volume explore trade’s dynamic role in the growth of early civilizations from the vantage points of archaeology, economics, social anthropology, and cultural geography.

1973, October 29–November 2
Advanced SeminarAncient Civilization and Trade
1973
The Classic Maya CollapseSAR Press PublicationThe Classic Maya Collapse

Of the many mysteries surrounding ancient Maya civilization, none has attracted greater interest than its collapse in the eighth and ninth centuries AD. Until recently, speculations on the causes of the collapse have been more numerous than excavated sites in the area. But the past twenty-five years have produced many new findings. In this book, thirteen leading scholars use new data to revise the image of ancient Maya civilization and create a new model of its collapse—a general model of sociopolitical collapse not limited to the cultural history of the Maya alone.



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