Barbara Rose Johnston

2010
Indians & EnergySAR Press PublicationIndians & Energy: Exploitation and Opportunity in the American SouthwestThe authors consider the complex relationship between development and Indian communities in the Southwest in order to reveal how an understanding of patterns in the past can guide policies and decisions in the future.
2009
Development & DispossessionSAR Press PublicationDevelopment & Dispossession: The Crisis of Forced Displacement and ResettlementResettlement has been so poorly planned, financed, implemented, and administered that these projects end up being “development disasters.” Because there can be no return to land submerged under a dam-created lake or to a neighborhood buried under a stadium or throughway, the solutions devised to meet the needs of people displaced by development must be durable. The contributors to this volume analyze the failures of existing resettlement policies and propose just such durable solutions.
2007
Half-Lives & Half-TruthsSAR Press PublicationHalf-Lives & Half-Truths: Confronting the Radioactive Legacies of the Cold WarThe long Cold War of the twentieth century has ended, but only now are the poisonous legacies of that “first nuclear age” coming to light. Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments.
2006–2007
Barbara Rose JohnstonWeatherhead Resident ScholarCold War Crimes: The Use and Abuse of Indigenous Groups as Human Subjects in Cold War Research
2005, September 25–29
Advanced SeminarRethinking Frameworks, Methodologies, and the Role of Anthropology in Development Induced Displacement and Resettlement (DIDR)The World Bank calculates that development projects displace approximately 10 million people a year. Families and communities are displaced by capital-intensive, high-technology, large-scale projects that convert farmlands, fishing grounds, forests, and homes into reservoirs, mining operations, industrial complexes, tourist resorts, and other uses that favor national or global interests. Designed to spur economic growth and spread general welfare, many of these projects leave locals permanently displaced, disempowered, and destitute. The extent to which development can be carried out both ethically, democratically, and effectively was a central concern of this Advanced Seminar.
2005
Globalization, Water, & HealthSAR Press PublicationGlobalization, Water, & Health: Resource Management in Times of ScarcityThis book is about crime and passion, life and death, lofty goals and squalid realities. It is a book about water. Global disparities in health and access to water are two major threats to world stability.
2005, February 23–24
Short SeminarPublic EthnographyIn hopes of educating and moving the public to action, “Public Ethnography,” a short seminar chaired by Barbara Tedlock and Nancy Owen Lewis, developed a proposal for a book series on the topic that is “socially grounded and emotionally engaged, participatory, collaborative, and well-written.”


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