Maile Andrade

Eric and Barbara Dobkin Fellowship

2012

Maile AndradeMaile Andrade2012 Dobkin Fellow Maile Andrade pictured here with several works she completed while in residence at SAR. Concept by Maile Andrade, photographs by Jason S. Ordaz.
Maile Andrade
Face To Face with Maile AndradeFace To Face with Maile Andrade2012 Dobkin Fellow Maile Andrade faces a facsimile of her own image. It was created by screening prints onto multiple layers of glass, fusing them, and then slumping the glass into a mold of her face.Profile of Maile Andrade (3-D)Profile of Maile Andrade (3-D)2012 Dobkin Fellow Maile Andrade’s facsimile of her own image. It was created by screening prints onto multiple layers of glass, fusing them, and then slumping the glass into a mold of her face. Stereo photograph by Jason S. Ordaz.
Face To Face with Maile AndradeProfile of Maile Andrade (3-D)

A multimedia artist living in Hilo, Hawai’i, Maile Andrade is a professor of art at the University of Hawai’i. While at SAR, she plans to work with a primary idea manifested in the Hawaiian language. “I Keia Manawa—In This Time” refers to Native Hawaiians standing firmly in the present with their backs to the future and their eyes on the past. She proposes to work in various media, such as glass, metal, and various fibers.

According to Maile:

Imagery has documented the history, identity, and worldviews of native Hawaiian people. Native Hawaiians have used visual symbols and forms to represent their past and present life experiences. My work reflects and is rooted in a native Hawaiian worldview. I would like to explore and question through contemporary art forms and visual statements the use and perpetuation of stereotypes from many lenses. The questions used in the disciplines of ethnography and anthropology are challenging in the misappropriation of cultural practices, cosmology, and spirituality. There is a tension of time and space, distortion of social, cultural, and historical facts as if the events never happened in the way that the people remembered them. As indigenous peoples express the right to identify themselves, the picture of a diverse history will emerge and will challenge the use of native stereotypes and imagining the “Native Hawaiian.”

Professor Andrade is an accomplished artist with her work having been featured in exhibitions such as Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation I; Contemporary Native North American Art from the West; Northwest & Pacific; ‘Ili Iho: The Surface Within at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu; and Te Mata at the Toimairangi Gallery in Hastings, New Zealand. In addition, she has lectured all over the world on her art as well as on Hawaiian and artist issues.


YouTube Audio: Listen to Maile Andrade’s artist talk.

Maile holds a BA from the University of Hawai’i at Hilo and MFA from the University of Hawai’i Manoa. She will be in residence from March 1–May 31, 2012.


Sponsored by Dobkin Family Foundation

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