Seminars & Collection Reviews

Zuni water jar c. 1900Zuni water jar c. 1900IARC catalog number SAR.2011-9-1, photograph by Addison DotyZuni water jar c. 1900IARC catalog number SAR.2011-9-1, photograph by Addison Doty

Zuni Collection Reviews

During FY 2011-2012, IARC staff, in cooperation with Jim Enote and Octavius Seowtewa from the Zuni Tribe, continued their review and interpretation of the Zuni collection. Approximately 1,020 pieces have been reviewed since the beginning of the project. The information obtained in the reviews substantially adds to the documentation of the Zuni collection, which will aid future researchers.

Moccasin Seminar III

Six moccasin makers met at SAR on October 21, 2011, for the final seminar to review preliminary text for a moccasin exhibit and to preview the short film To Feel the Earth: Moccasins in the Southwest, produced by SAR and Red Ant Films, which highlights moccasins in Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache cultures and also addresses the importance of wearing moccasins. Herb Stevens, Will Tsosie, and Pat Tenorio are featured in the film, along with moccasins made by Gary Roybal, John Garcia, and Edwin Herrera. Former Harvey J. Branigar Jr. intern Jessica Metcalfe is also featured, due to her expertise in Native fashion. The film will travel with the exhibit. Its official public opening will be at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in October 2012.

Moccasin Maker Seminar Participants Wearing Their MoccasinsOctober 21, 2011Moccasin Seminar IIIFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, IARC Director, School for Advanced ResearchThe six moccasin makers met at SAR on October 21, 2011 for another seminar to continue discussions on the collaborative project on Southwest moccasins.

San Felipe Pottery Seminars

In March, May, and June 2012, the IARC brought together six potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community. Daryl Candelaria, Gerren Candelaria, Hubert Candelario, Ray Garcia, Joseph Latoma, Geraldine Lovato, and Ricardo Ortiz met three times over the course of a few months to grapple with various issues such as how to define pottery from San Felipe Pueblo and what it means to be a potter from the Pueblo. During their meetings, they also shared ideas, materials, and techniques related to creating pottery.

San Felipe is not well known for pottery making. In part, this may have given potters the freedom to experiment so that each has a unique style. In the upcoming year, the IARC staff will continue working with these potters to create an online exhibit that explores the complexities surrounding San Felipe pottery and provides general information on this little known art form in the community.

Gerren CandelariaMarch 14, 2012San Felipe Potters Seminar IFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Director, IARC, School for Advanced ResearchIn 2012, the IARC brought together seven potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community.
Geraldine LovatoMay 11, 2012San Felipe Potters Seminar IIFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Director, IARC, School for Advanced ResearchIn 2012, the IARC brought together seven potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community.
Hubert CandelarioJune 25, 2012San Felipe Potters Seminar IIIFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Director, IARC, School for Advanced ResearchIn 2012, the IARC brought together seven potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community.

Sand Creek Massacre Descendants Trust and the Chief White Antelope Blanket

The Chief White Antelope blanket, currently housed in the IARC collections, was purportedly taken from the body of Chief White Antelope at the Sand Creek Massacre on November 29, 1864. In December, IARC collections manager, Laura Elliff, transported the blanket to the Sand Creek Massacre Descendants Trust annual gathering in Anadarko, Oklahoma. The blanket was on view in a display case for the descendants of Chief White Antelope and those individuals killed at Sand Creek. During the one-day gathering, Elliff met with descendants and also provided educational information about the blanket and SAR to visitors. Singing, drumming, and gourd dancing were continuous throughout the gathering.

IARC and SCMDT have a collaborative partnership that includes consultation concerning questions of research, access, publication, and preservation and care of the blanket. SAR staff transports the blanket every two years to the SCMDT.

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