Native Artists

Franklin PetersFranklin Peters2011 Rollin and Mary Ella King FellowFranklin Peters2011 Rollin and Mary Ella King Fellow

Franklin Peters

2011 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow

As an emerging artist, Acoma potter Franklin Peters spent his time at SAR studying the Indian Arts Research Center collections to better understand the techniques and processes of his ancestors. One of his challenges was to increase the size of his pots and to incorporate more historical designs into his work, which he accomplished admirably. During his tenure, Peters was also able to advance his own sense of style. Peters received his pottery training from Phyllis Juanico, Florence Aragon, and his mother, Ella Peters. His work has been shown in several galleries around Albuquerque, such as the Agape Gallery, Bien Mur Indian Market Center, Nizhoni Gallery, Palms Trading, Somé Gallery, and Wiketts Gallery. His work has also been shown at the Sky City Gift Shop in Acoma.

After completing his fellowship, Peters applied to the Southwest Association for Indian Arts and was accepted. He participated in his first art market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, in August 2012. Peters also now has gallery representation in Santa Fe with Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery.

Franklin Peters was in residence at SAR from September 1–December 1, 2011. Find out more about Franklin Peters by visiting his section on the SAR website.

Janice GouldJanice GouldJanice Gould

Janice Gould

2011 SAR Writer-in-Residence

A highly accomplished writer and artist, Janice Gould has taught writing, women’s studies, and ethnic studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs; Clark College; and Willamette University. She has also authored and edited several books, including: Beneath My Heart; the chapbook Alphabet; Earthquake Weather: Poems; Speak to Me Words: Essays in American Indian Poetry; and most recently, Doubters and Dreamers: Poems and Narrations.

Gould is also trained as a classical musician and has worked semi-professionally as a musician for some years, playing guitar, accordion, and performing vocals in a trio. She received her PhD in English in 2000 from the University of New Mexico.

While at SAR, Gould’s project was to complete a set of gacelas and set them to music and photographs. She was able to accomplish much of this project and now looks forward to completing it at home in Colorado Springs. In addition to her stated project, she was also able to rewrite and revise many of her other poems, which she is now preparing for manuscript. Toward the end of her tenure at SAR, Gould was able to bring in world-renowned Muscogee poet and musician Joy Harjo for three days of workshops, followed by a public reading.

Janice Gould was in residence at SAR from January 3–February 21, 2012. Find out more about Janice Gould by visiting her section on the SAR website.

Face To Face with Maile AndradeFace To Face with Maile Andrade2012 Dobkin Fellow Maile Andrade faces a facsimile of her own image. It was created by screening prints onto multiple layers of glass, fusing them, and then slumping the glass into a mold of her face.Face To Face with Maile Andrade2012 Dobkin Fellow Maile Andrade faces a facsimile of her own image. It was created by screening prints onto multiple layers of glass, fusing them, and then slumping the glass into a mold of her face.

Maile Andrade

2012 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist

A multimedia artist living in Kilauea, Hawai’i, Maile Andrade is a professor of art at the University of Hawai’i. While at SAR, she explored a primary idea that manifests itself in the Hawaiian language. “I Keia Manawa—In This Time”, which refers to Native Hawaiians standing firmly in the present with their backs to the future and their eyes on the past. Andrade chose to work primarily in glass to explore her concept.

Andrade is an accomplished artist, her work having been featured in exhibitions such as Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation I; Contemporary Native North American Art from the West; Northwest & Pacific; ‘Ili Iho: The Surface Within at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu; and Te Mata at the Toimairangi Gallery in Hastings, New Zealand. In addition, she has lectured all over the world on her art as well as on Hawai’ian and artist’s issues.

Maile Andrade was in residence at SAR from March 1–May 31, 2012. Find out more about Maile Andrade by visiting her section on the SAR website.

Louie GarcíaLouie García2012 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow
Louie García2012 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow

Louie García

2012 Ronald and Susan Dubin Native Artist Fellow

Weaver Louie García (Tiwa/Piro Pueblo) joined SAR in June 2012 to complete a 100 percent wool, plaid blanket, or manta, woven in the traditional diamond and diagonal twill patterns, which are present on historic textiles. The project included natural hand-spun Churro wool yarns, some of which were dyed with indigo as was done in the past.

Taught the art of weaving by his grandfather, García understands the importance of passing on his skills to future generations. He is the current president of the New Mexico Pueblo Fiber Arts Guild and teaches Pueblo weaving at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque. In addition, he instructs an ongoing Pueblo men’s weaving class in Santa Clara Pueblo in an effort to help revive the art of growing cotton and weaving in Santa Clara.

Louie García was in residence at SAR from June 15–August 15, 2012. Find out more about Louie García by visiting his section on the SAR website.

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