The Colloquium Series—Our Tasting Room

42 Colloquium Presentations

ForkRecipe § Tres Leches Cake

In 1974, the year after SAR began its resident scholar program, we recognized an opportunity to share our work with the small city of Santa Fe, renowned for its cultural diversity, its community of artists, and its atmosphere of intellectual curiosity. For the last forty years Santafesiños have flocked to campus to sample the breadth and depth of the scholarship and artistry we foster.

The colloquium presentations, which are free and open to the public, occur at noon most Wednesdays throughout the year. Campus, resident, and summer scholars, research associates, Native artists and interns, and advanced seminar chairs present their work to fellow scholars, staff, and the public in the SAR board room. This year, in addition to SAR’s “local talent,” the School was pleased to host presentations by six Māori who work in heritage language programs in New Zealand, by SAR and Wheelwright Museum research associate Susan Brown McGreevy on the traders Bill Beaver and Mark Winter, as well as four other scholars on topics such as the evolution of the human family, the Coronado Expedition, and the Federal Indian Service at the turn of the twentieth century.

After each colloquium, scholars are treated to a luncheon, where discussion is lively and long over delicious dishes prepared by SAR guest services staff. Scholars often remain huddled together around the table in intense exchanges about the topic of the day long after lunch is over.

July 2011
Jennifer Shannon Colloquium
Wednesday, July 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Writing an Ethnography of “Our Lives”: Collaborative Exhibit Making at the National Museum of the American Indian Jennifer Shannon, Assistant Professor and Curator, Department of Anthropology and Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Bunting Summer Scholar The predicaments and rewards resulting from the commitment by the National Museum of the American Indian to collaborate with Native peoples.
Edmundo Cruz Luna Colloquium
Wednesday, July 13, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Complexities of Negotiating Cultural and Linguistic Identities Online—in Balinese Edmundo Cruz Luna, Instructor, Department of English Education, Mokpo National University, South Korea, and Smeall Summer Scholar This presentation addresses how native Balinese speakers develop and present their cultural and linguistic identities in online forums.
Sascha Scott Colloquium
Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Awa Tsireh’s Paintings of Koshare and the Politics of Preservation Sascha Scott, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Music Histories, Syracuse University, and Bunting Summer Scholar Analysis of the paintings by Awa Tsireh of San Ildefonso illuminates the Pueblos’ role in the political and cultural debates of the 1920s.
Ufuk Serin Colloquium
Wednesday, July 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late Antique and Byzantine Monuments and the Topography of Southern Caria in the Light of New Archaeological Evidence Ufuk Serin, Guest Scholar, Department of Architecture, Middle East University, Turkey, and Cotsen Summer Scholar This presentation examines the archaeology, history, and art history of Late Antique and Byzantine monuments in Southern Caria, Turkey.
August 2011
Joan Jensen Colloquium
Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Historiography and Anthropology: The Case of Frances Densmore Joan M. Jensen, Professor Emerita, Department of History, New Mexico State University, and Adams Summer Scholar This presentation sheds new light on the work of anthropologist Frances Densmore.
September 2011
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, September 7, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations by the 2011–2012 SAR Resident Fellows
Linda C. Garro Colloquium
Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Health as a Family Matter: Health and Well-Being as Enacted in Dual-Earner Middle-Class Family Life in Los Angeles Linda C. Garro, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Most US health research relies on individuals as the unit of analysis.
Hemi Rau Colloquium
Wednesday, September 21, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Māori Learners Enjoying Success as Māori in Māori/English Language Programs Cath Rau, Hemi Rau, Paul Royal, Eleanor Eketone, Moana Salu, Robyn Hata-Gage, and Pihere Levi; New Zealand (Aotearoa) Practitioners working in two long-established heritage language programs in New Zealand will discuss the programs in their respective schools and share examples of Māori students enjoying success as Māori.
A Tale of Two Traders: Bill Beaver and Mark Winter Colloquium
Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm A Tale of Two Traders: Bill Beaver and Mark Winter Susan Brown McGreevy, Humanities Scholar, Utah Museum of Natural History, and IARC Research Associate While many trading posts within the Navajo Nation have closed their doors, the stories of Beaver and Winter revisit the relationships between trader and artist within a framework of collecting, documenting, and artistic development.
October 2011
Margaret M. Bruchac Colloquium
Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Consorting with Savages: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists Margaret M. Bruchac, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar A series of case studies serve to illustrate how Native gatekeepers assisted and resisted the exchange of knowledge.
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Biosecurity and Vulnerability Advanced Seminar co-chairs Lesley A. Sharp, Ann Whitney Olin Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, and Senior Research Scientist in Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; and Nancy N. Chen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz This presentation addresses the perilous embodied consequences associated with a recent proliferation in global security measures.
Wossen Argaw Tegegn Colloquium
Wednesday, October 19, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Fire on the Foot: A Case of Gender-Based Violence in a University Setting Wossen Argaw Tegegn, Research Scholar, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna, and Campbell Resident Scholar This presentation demonstrates how the culture of gender-based violence in a university setting is a function of the gendered power dynamics observed in the wider patriarchal society.
Teresa L. McCarty Colloquium
Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Indigenous Youth and Language Survival Teresa L. McCarty, Snell Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar Research with Native American communities undergoing rapid heritage-language loss.
November 2011
Craig R. Janes Colloquium
Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A Perfect Storm: Climate Change and Liberal Economic Development in Mongolia Craig Janes, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, and Henry Luce Resident Scholar This presentation examines how Mongolia’s transition from Soviet-style socialism to an unregulated free-market economy has affected the productivity and sustainability of agriculture and livestock herding.
Julie M. Weise Colloquium
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Corazón de Dixie: Migration and the Struggle for Rights in the U.S. South and Mexico, 1910–2010 Julie Weise, Assistant Professor, International Studies Program, California State University, Long Beach, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation chronicles the vibrant transnational world of Mexican migrants in the U.S.
December 2011
Nancy Marie Mithlo Colloquium
Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reading the Image: The Photography of Horace Poolaw in Context Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar Kiowa photographer Horace Poolaw (1906–1984) documented the vibrancy of the southern Plains communities near Anadarko, Oklahoma with a keen sense of place and people.
Kitty King Corbett Colloquium
Wednesday, December 14, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Reframing Global Health in the Context of Environmental Crisis Kitty Corbett, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Human communities are facing unprecedented threats from natural resource depletion, extinctions, pollution, overpopulation, and climate change.
January 2012
Discover the Living Spirit of Native Art, Home Fires Event Colloquium
Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Evolution of the Human Family Laura Fortunato, 2011 Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute This talk presents recent advances in the application of evolutionary thinking to the study of the human family, focusing on the evolution of marriage and inheritance strategies.
Wossen Argaw Tegegn Colloquium
Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Unpacking Gendered Institutional Norms: Who Holds the Mouse? Why? Wossen Argaw Tegegn, Research Scholar, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Vienna, and Campbell Resident Scholar This presentation questions the often unquestioned norms whereby men control equipment such as the mouse in computer science labs, the theodolite in surveying technology field sessions, and the voltmeter in electrical engineering workshops.
President's Garden in Winter Colloquium
Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Federal Indian Service and Intertribal Identity at the Turn of the 20th Century Cathleen Cahill, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of New Mexico Cathleen Cahill will discuss her recently published book, Federal Fathers and Mothers: A Social History of the US Indian Service.
February 2012
Aimee V. Garza Colloquium
Wednesday, February 1, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free A State for Sanctuary: The Curious Life of a Controversial Proclamation Aimee V. Garza, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California Santa Cruz and SAR Visiting Research Associate This lecture uncovers the untold history of the Sanctuary Movement in New Mexico during the 1980s.
Southwest Crossroads Map “Trails” Colloquium
Wednesday, February 8, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Coronado Expedition, Discoveries Since 1992 Richard and Shirley Flint, Research Associates, Archaeology Southwest NPS concluded that insufficient information existed about the route followed by the Coronado expedition. Subsequently, a major campsite of the Coronado expedition was located in Texas.
John Martin Colloquium
Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Why More Boys than Girls—Or More Girls than Boys?: New Findings on Human Sex Ratio Variation at Birth John Martin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University and Visiting Research Associate; and Paul Wren, Senior Principle Engineer, Performance Software Corporation, Phoenix, AZ, and Co-Founder and Administrator of Open Anthropology Cooperative Why is the ratio of male to female births among women who do not live with other women of fertile age higher than it is with women who do?
Julie M. Weise Colloquium
Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Migration and its Discontents in the U.S. South Since 1960 Julie Weise, Assistant Professor, International Studies Program, California State University, Long Beach and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation discusses the Mexican agricultural workers who moved to rural Georgia in the 1960s–1980s, and goes on to explain Mexican migration to greater Charlotte, North Carolina since 1990.
Doorway in Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon Colloquium
Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Chaco and Cahuachi: A Tale of Two Pilgrimage Centers John Kantner, Vice President for Academic & Institutional Advancement Comparative archaeological investigation of Chaco Canyon in the US Southwest and Cahuachi on the south coast of Peru is providing insights into how large pilgrimage centers develop.
March 2012
Frédérique Apffel-Marglin Colloquium
Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Subversive Spiritualties: How Rituals Enact the World Frédérique Apffel-Marglin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, Smith College Apffel-Marglin draws on Bohrian quantum physics and critical science studies, as well as empirical data from archaeology, geography, ethnobotany, and anthropology, to argue that there is no pre-given nature as the back-drop to human action.
Nicole Taylor Colloquium
Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Obesity and Body Image Concerns among High School Teens Nicole Taylor, Director, Scholar Programs, SAR Popular obesity discourses in the US have constructed a perceptual reality wherein it seems as though no one is safe from becoming fat.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Disturbing Bodies: The Politics and Practice of Forensic Exhumation Advanced Seminar co-chairs Zoë Crossland, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University; and Rosemary Joyce, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley What values and beliefs underlie the burgeoning practice of forensic exhumation—re-excavating human remains to address questions of justice?
April 2012
Craig R. Janes Colloquium
Wednesday, April 4, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mining Mongolia: Reflections on the “Resource Curse,” Poverty, and Applied Anthropology in the Asian El Dorado Craig R. Janes, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University and Henry Luce Foundation Resident Scholar, SAR Dr. Janes will reflect on the emergence and exacerbation of poverty and rural underdevelopment in the face of vast mineral wealth, and discuss efforts to address the social and health impacts of mining and related development activities.
Margaret M. Bruchac Colloquium
Wednesday, April 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Keen Eyes: Recovering Bertha Parker's Lost Contributions to Indigenous Archaeology Margaret M. Bruchac, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Connecticut, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar, SAR This research is excerpted from a book manuscript that critically examines and reconceptualizes relations among American anthropologists and indigenous informants.
Aimee V. Garza Colloquium
Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Mexican Migration and the Politics of Religious Revivalism in New Mexico Aimee V. Garza, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Research Associate, SAR The Catholic Charismatic Renewal or renovación carismática is a religious revitalization movement that is sweeping northern Mexico, growing in popularity with Mexican migrants residing in the United States, and changing what it means to be Catholic on both sides of the border.
May 2012
Teresa McCarty Colloquium
Wednesday, May 2, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Genealogies of Language Loss and Recovery: A Closer Look at Language in the Lives of Native American Youth Teresa L. McCarty, AW Snell Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University, and National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar This presentation takes a closer look at the ways in which explicit and implicit policies about language are constructed intergenerationally in contexts of linguistic and cultural oppression, and how those policies take shape in indigenous young people’s lives.
SAR Logo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Anne Ray Intern Presentations SAR Anne Ray Interns Kelsey Potdevin and Jennifer McCarty Gatekeepers and Traders in Alaska’s Northwest Interior 1800–1870 and Inupiat Ilitqusiat: Those Things that Make Us Who We Are
Malena Mörling Colloquium
Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Poetry Reading Malena Mörling, Research Associate, SAR Malena Mörling is the author of two collection of poetry, Ocean Avenue and Astoria as well as several translations. She will read her poems as well as translations of the pioneering, Finnish-Swedish modernist, Edith Södergran.
Nancy Marie Mithlo Colloquium
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Orality and the Native Image Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and American Indian Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar, SAR The repatriation of historic photographs to original source communities often elicits oral responses as memory and imagination are animated.
June 2012
Nancy Owen Lewis Colloquium
Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Selling Health in New Mexico: Bringing the Sick to the Land of the Well Nancy Owen Lewis, SAR Scholar-in-Residence and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow During New Mexico’s struggle for statehood, territorial officials promoted its climate as ideal for curing tuberculosis, the leading cause of death in America. As proof, they cited the absence of disease among its native people. This presentation examines the factors that shaped the health seeker movement from 1880–1900—and its unintended consequences.
Lawrence Rosen Colloquium
Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Romancing the Tribe: The History of an Anthropological Problem Lawrence Rosen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Princeton University, and William Y. and Nettie K. Adams Fellow, SAR The presentation will trace the history of the anthropological “romance of the tribe” not only for its impact on the discipline itself but how, as views of the tribe have changed, so have our views of humankind and the policies applied by Western nations in many parts of the world.
July 2012
Locust Tree in Bloom, Spring 2012 Colloquium
Thursday, July 5, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Bog and the Beast, The Engraver and the Priest: Museums, the Nation, and the World Peggy Levitt, Professor, Department of Sociology, Wellesley College, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Ever since the leaders of the new French Republic opened the doors of the Louvre to the French public, museums have strongly influenced how people imagine the nations where they live.
Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr. Colloquium
Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Red, Black, and Brown: Indian Schools and Black Educators after Brown v. Board of Education Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr., Ph.D. Candidate, Department of American Studies and African American Studies, Yale University, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR In the wake of “massive resistance” to the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown decision, hundreds of African Americans migrated to Indian country to work as teachers in reservation schools.
Sharon N. DeWitte Colloquium
Wednesday, July 18, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free The Demographic Effects of Medieval Plague: Longevity and Health in Post-Black Death London Sharon N. DeWitte, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South Carolina, and Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellow, SAR Using data from medieval London cemeteries, this presentation investigates the demographic and health effects of the fourteenth-century Black Death, one of the most devastating epidemics in human history and one which targeted relatively frail people.
Christopher Ball Colloquium
Wednesday, July 25, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Ritual Transformations: Healing, Development, and Culture Show in an Amazonian Society Christopher Ball, McKennan Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College, and Christopher Smeall Fellow, SAR This presentation addresses two abiding themes in cultural anthropology—the power of ritual to transform states of affairs in the social world, and changes in the meanings and functions of specific rituals under the effects of a globalized politics of identity.
August 2012
Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann Colloquium
Wednesday, August 1, 2012, 12:00–1:00 pm, Free Selling the Exotic to the Exotic: Islamic Talismans in Nineteenth-Century Asante, Ghana Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, and Cotsen Fellow, SAR During the nineteenth century, Islamic talismans traveled the camel caravan trade routes across sub-Saharan Africa, circulating widely amongst the non-Muslim Asante.
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