Advanced Seminars

The optimal advanced seminar format consists of ten scholars in residence for a week during which they are fed delicious meals and meet in quiet, comfortable surroundings. They engage in structured discussions and informal brainstorming sessions. This deceptively simple format fosters groundbreaking insights into fundamental questions and encourages scholars with differing perspectives to examine crosscutting themes. Since the inception of this program in 1967, well over two-thirds of the seminars have resulted in published volumes that allow individual papers and the results of the vigorous seminar discussions to be shared with the academic community and the general public.

Biosecurity and VulnerabilityOctober 9–13, 2011Biosecurity and VulnerabilityCo-chaired by Nancy Chen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz and Lesley A. Sharp, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College“Biosecurity” highlights the urgency with which nations police citizenry, transient populations, and border zones. This seminar convened to examine historical antecedents and the moral and material dimensions of biosecurity measures as experienced by individuals.
Disturbing Bodies: A Relational Exploration of Forensic Archaeological PracticeMarch 25–29, 2012Disturbing Bodies: A Relational Exploration of Forensic Archaeological PracticeCo-chaired by Zoë Crossland, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University and Rosemary A. Joyce, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, BerkeleyThe aim of this seminar was to discuss the values and beliefs that underlie forensic exhumation, and to explore the tensions that arise in the practice of forensic archaeological work.
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