The Indian Arts Research Center

Native Artist Fellows
Native Artist Fellows
Native Interns
Native Interns
Speaker Series
Speaker Series
New Resources
New Resources
Moccasin Seminar II
Moccasin Seminar II

As the foremost research center for Southwest Native arts and material culture, the Indian Arts Research Center uses its extraordinary collection as a nexus for artists, museum professionals, students, scholars, and community members to explore the past, present, and future of Southwest Indigenous arts and cultures. Through its programs, IARC’s goal is to bridge the divide between creativity and scholarship by supporting initiatives and projects in Native studies, art history, and creative expression that illuminate the intersections of the social sciences, humanities, and arts.

This year SAR’s new Literary Arts Program, funded by the Lannan Foundation, welcomed Cherokee poet Santee Frazier as the first recipient of the Indigenous Writer-in-Residence Fellowship. Frazier spent January and February on campus, concluding his tenure with a literary conversation hosted by Ojibwe novelist and literary critic David Treuer in February.

Focusing on the need for practical training in working with tribal collections, this year’s IARC speaker series, “Getting Back to Basics: Practice and Process in Native Collections Care,” was generously supported by the Anne Ray Charitable Trust. Each event was recorded and posted online with supporting materials as a resource for students and educators. Along with the speaker series teaching tools and the IARC Facebook page, two new online exhibits curated by Anne Ray Native Interns Gloria Bell (Métis) and Teresa Montoya (Diné) broadened the IARC’s presence on the Internet.

Thanks to support from the Anne Ray Charitable Trust, this year the IARC continued the Anne Ray Internship, a program focused on training recent college graduates and junior museum professionals interested in furthering their collections management experience and enhancing their intellectual capacity for contributing to the expanding field and discourse of museum studies. The interns, Gloria Bell and Teresa Montoya, worked in the areas of registration, collections management, education, and programming, as well as presented their most recent research in SAR’s colloquium series.

In partnership with the Summer Policy Academy at the Santa Fe Indian School, SAR was able to support one summer intern at the IARC. This internship helps students from the Summer Policy Academy gain work experience and broaden their perspectives, and it introduces them to the museum field. Joseph Skeets (Diné) was the 2011 SAR-SPA summer intern.

A group of Native moccasin makers, who first met at SAR in 2009, returned in October to discuss plans for a traveling banner exhibit on Southwest Native moccasins, tentatively scheduled for completion in June 2012. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian has enjoyed much success with this exhibit format, which “allows for the banners’ display in nontraditional museum spaces such as libraries or community centers in Native communities,” said IARC Director Cynthia Chavez Lamar.

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