Colloquium Series

38 Colloquium Presentations

Initiated in 1974 as the “Wednesday scholar lunch,” the colloquium series in SAR’s historic boardroom has convened resident scholars, SAR staff and board members, and people from Santa Fe’s scholarly community every week for nearly forty years to hear presentations of new and in-process work. A working lunch with the presenter for resident and staff scholars follows the hour-long program, and the conversation often continues throughout the day. The series is free and open to the public and begins promptly at noon.

In addition to presentations from resident and summer scholars, research associates, Native fellows and interns, and advanced seminar chairs, this year the colloquium series showcased several special guests. In October, SAR board member and University of New Mexico professor Steven Feld brought percussion master Nii Otoo Annan from Ghana to present “A Drummer Listens to the World,” while Wellesley College professor Eve Zimmerman brightened February with her fascinating look at “Comic Books for Big Girls,” an analysis of the work of Japanese manga artist Uchida Shungiku.

July 2010
Minette C. Church Colloquium
Wednesday, July 7, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Childhood, Materiality, and Identity in the Contested Landscapes of Southern Colorado Minette C. Church, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Cotsen Summer Scholar
Cecilia Ballí Colloquium
Wednesday, July 14, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm The Fence and the River: Border Enforcement in the Age of National Security Cecilia Ballí, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, and Bunting Summer Scholar
Jason Pribilsky Colloquium
Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Culture’s Laboratory: Scientific Imagination, Andean Peasants, and the Making of the Cornell-Peru Project at Vicos Jason C. Pribilsky, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Whitman College, and Adams Summer Scholar
Poornima Paidipaty Colloquium
Wednesday, July 28, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Making Space/Making Race: Tribal Anthropology and the Colonial Frontier in 19th Century British India Poornima L. Paidipaty, Collegiate Assistant Professor and Harper-Schmidt Fellow, Society of Fellows, University of Chicago, and Adams Summer Scholar
August 2010
Zoë Wool Colloquium
Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Vital Signs and Möbius Time: Frayed Ordinaries at Walter Reed Zoë H. Wool, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto and Bunting Summer Scholar
September 2010
2010–2011 Resident Scholars Colloquium
Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Introductory Presentations by 2010–2011 SAR Resident Fellows
Ernestine S. Elster Colloquium
Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Scaloria Cave: Found, Lost and Found Again Ernestine Elster, Research Associate, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, and SAR Visiting Research Associate Neolithic underground ritual is examined in this presentation on Scaloria Cave in Italy, a site discovered in the 1930s, but subsequently lost and found. The relationship between the cave and the Neolithic villages on the Tavoliere Plain is discussed.
Douglas W. Schwartz Colloquium
Wednesday, September 22, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Pilgrims Drawn to Sacred Power: Santiago de Compostela Douglas W. Schwartz, Senior Scholar, SAR Who and why are pilgrims and what occurs during their journeys? After a general introduction, a detailed look follows at one major pilgrimage that has continued for a thousand years to Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain.
Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic Collections Colloquium
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Reassembling the Collection: Indigenous Agency and Ethnographic Collections Advanced seminar chairs Sarah Byrne, University of London; Annie Clarke, University of Sydney; Rodney Harrison, Open University; and Robin Torrence, Australian Museum Museum collections are established through a complex series of interactions in which indigenous peoples play a key role. The preliminary results of current research are discussed.
October 2010
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, October 6, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm A Drummer Listens to the World Nii Otoo Annan, Percussion Master, Ghana, and Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, University of New Mexico
Jamila Bargach Colloquium
Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Harvesting Fog: Introducing a Multi-faceted Problem Jamila Bargach, Academic Director, Foundation SiHmad Derhem for the Development of the South and the Sahara, and Campbell Resident Scholar
Abstract Landscapes and Social Visions: Reading Southwestern Photobooks Colloquium
Wednesday, October 20, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Abstract Landscapes and Social Visions: Reading Southwestern Photobooks Audrey Goodman, Associate Professor of English, Georgia State University
Stephen H. Lekson Colloquium
Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Scalar Thresholds in the Ancient Southwest: Density and Distance Stephen H. Lekson, Curator and Professor, Museum of Natural History and Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Visiting Research Associate
November 2010
Doug Kiel Colloquium
Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Dreams Deferred: Competing Visions for Social Change on the Oneida Reservation Doug Kiel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar
Catherine M. Cameron Colloquium
Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Captives and the Creation of Power Catherine M. Cameron, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
December 2010
Sarah K. Croucher Colloquium
Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Making Local Identities: Ceramic Production in 19th-Century Eastern Africa Sarah K. Croucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wesleyan University, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar
Melissa K. Nelson Colloquium
Wednesday, December 8, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Still Singing: The Eco-Cultural Revitalization of the Southern Paiute Salt Song Trail Melissa K. Nelson, Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar
Lucas Bessire Colloquium
Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 12:00–1:00 pm Culture Against Life: Bodily Affliction, Transnational Governance, and the Limits of the Human in the Gran Chaco Lucas Bessire, Postdoctoral Fellow, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowship Program, and SAR Visiting Research Associate
January 2011
Daguerreotype of SAR Colloquium
Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late to Terminal Classic Ritual Transitions at the Ancient Maya City of El Perú-Waká, Petén, Guatemala: A View from Structure M13-1 Olivia C. Navarro-Farr, Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Office for Equity and Inclusion, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico
Jessica Rheann Metcalfe Colloquium
Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Native Designers of High Fashion: Expressing Identity, Creativity, and Tradition in Contemporary Clothing Design Jessica R. Metcalfe, Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Office for Equity and Inclusion, Department of Anthropology and Native Studies, University of New Mexico
February 2011
Comic Books for Big Girls: Uchida Shungiku and the Realm of the Dollhouse Colloquium
Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Comic Books for Big Girls: Uchida Shungiku and the Realm of the Dollhouse Eve Zimmerman, Associate Professor of Japanese, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Wellesley College
“Hano Pueblo, Hopi, Arizona, ca. 1890” Colloquium
Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Ethnogenesis and Human Diversity: The Tewa Case Scott G. Ortman, Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute, and Lightfoot Fellow, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center
Jamila Bargach Colloquium
Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Unwed Mothers in Morocco: Between Social Damnation and (Possible) Legal Redemption Jamila Bargach, Academic Director, Foundation SiHmad Derhem for the Development of the South and the Sahara, and Campbell Resident Scholar
March 2011
Resident Scholar Dean Falk Colloquium
Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Evolution and Asperger’s Syndrome: Is There a Connection? Dean Falk, SAR Senior Scholar and Hale G. Professor, Department of Anthropology, Florida State University
Street Economies, Politics, and Social Movements in the Urban Global South Colloquium
Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Street Economies, Politics, and Social Movements in the Urban Global South Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Walter E. Little, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Albany, State University of New York; Karen Tranberg Hansen, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University; and B. Lynne Milgram, Professor of Anthropology, Faculty of Liberal Studies, Ontario College of Art and Design
Gloria Bell Colloquium
Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Voyageur Re-presentations and Complications: Frances Anne Hopkins and the Métis Nation of Ontario Gloria Bell (Métis), M.A. in Art History, Carleton University, and Anne Ray Native Intern People of Native (Cree, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee) and European (English, French, Irish, Scottish) descent, métis, were employed as voyageurs in the fur-trade since the early eighteenth century in the Great Lakes area, yet their voices are absent in the historical records and their bodies and lifestyle are often represented as “other.”
April 2011
The 9/11 Generation: Young Muslims in the New World Order Colloquium
Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm The 9/11 Generation: Young Muslims in the New World Order Advanced Seminar Co-chairs Adeline Masquelier, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, and Benjamin F. Soares, Senior Research Fellow, African Studies Center, Leiden The traumatic events of September 11, 2001 have shaped the consciousness of a new global generation. What it means to be young and Muslim has changed. Coming of age in a Muslim majority society or as a Muslim minority in America and Europe is described by the co-chairs of this SAR seminar.
Sarah K. Croucher Colloquium
Wednesday, April 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Capitalism and Cloves: A Critique of Historical Archaeology Sarah K. Croucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wesleyan University, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar Working on historical archaeology in Eastern Africa raises questions as to how the narrative of Islamic plantations might be written into a global historical archaeology. This talk addresses the potential for changing taken-for-granted narratives in this field by writing Zanzibar back in to the archaeology of the modern world.
Teresa Montoya Colloquium
Wednesday, April 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Woven Kin: Exploring Representation and Collaboration in Navajo Weaving Teresa Montoya (Diné), M.A. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Denver, and Anne Ray Native Intern This presentation explores the relationship between representational strategies and the employment of critical indigenous methodologies in the display of Navajo weavings in both Native and non-Native museums.
May 2011
Doug Kiel Colloquium
Wednesday, May 4, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Rethinking the Urban/Reservation Relationship in American Indian History Doug Kiel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Katrin H. Lamon Resident Scholar A growing body of scholarly literature has examined urban Indian experiences and 20th century reservation histories, but little attention has been devoted to the connections between urban and reservation communities.
Melissa K. Nelson Colloquium
Wednesday, May 11, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Indigenous Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Persistence in Place Melissa K. Nelson, Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, and Anne Ray Resident Scholar This presentation explores the philosophies, methods, and practices of Indigenous science as articulated by Native scholars, leaders, and traditional practitioners.
Catherine M. Cameron Colloquium
Wednesday, May 18, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Captives: Invisible Agents of Culture Change Catherine M. Cameron, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, and Weatherhead Resident Scholar This presentation explores the role of captives in captor society, how they affected captor social boundaries, and their potential impact on culture change.
June 2011
Joanna Brooks Colloquium
Wednesday, June 29, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Why We Left: A Literary Archaeology of Anglo-American Colonialism Joanna Brooks, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of English and Comparative Literature, San Diego State University, and Bunting Summer Scholar During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, thousands of peasants left England for North America.
July 2011
Jennifer Shannon Colloquium
Wednesday, July 6, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Writing an Ethnography of “Our Lives”: Collaborative Exhibit Making at the National Museum of the American Indian Jennifer Shannon, Assistant Professor and Curator, Department of Anthropology and Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Bunting Summer Scholar The predicaments and rewards resulting from the commitment by the National Museum of the American Indian to collaborate with Native peoples.
Edmundo Cruz Luna Colloquium
Wednesday, July 13, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Complexities of Negotiating Cultural and Linguistic Identities Online—in Balinese Edmundo Cruz Luna, Instructor, Department of English Education, Mokpo National University, South Korea, and Smeall Summer Scholar This presentation addresses how native Balinese speakers develop and present their cultural and linguistic identities in online forums.
Sascha Scott Colloquium
Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Awa Tsireh’s Paintings of Koshare and the Politics of Preservation Sascha Scott, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Music Histories, Syracuse University, and Bunting Summer Scholar Analysis of the paintings by Awa Tsireh of San Ildefonso illuminates the Pueblos’ role in the political and cultural debates of the 1920s.
Ufuk Serin Colloquium
Wednesday, July 27, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Late Antique and Byzantine Monuments and the Topography of Southern Caria in the Light of New Archaeological Evidence Ufuk Serin, Guest Scholar, Department of Architecture, Middle East University, Turkey, and Cotsen Summer Scholar This presentation examines the archaeology, history, and art history of Late Antique and Byzantine monuments in Southern Caria, Turkey.
August 2011
Joan Jensen Colloquium
Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:00–1:00 pm Historiography and Anthropology: The Case of Frances Densmore Joan M. Jensen, Professor Emerita, Department of History, New Mexico State University, and Adams Summer Scholar This presentation sheds new light on the work of anthropologist Frances Densmore.
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