Visiting Researchers

Jessica Metcalfe

Jessica Metcalfe

“Native Fashion Designers”
Metcalfe, a PhD candidate in American Indian studies at the University of Arizona, worked on completing her doctoral dissertation this year. A Turtle Mountain Chippewa, she was the 2008–2009 Branigar Intern at IARC. She received a Ruth Landes Memorial Research Fund fellowship in order to return to SAR.

Find out more about Jessica Metcalfe by visiting the SAR website (opens in new browser window).

Malena Mörling

Malena Mörling

Poetry
In the fall of 2009, SAR research associate Malena Mörling received a Charles L. Cahill Award from the University of North Carolina–Wilmington to pursue research in Sweden during the summer of 2010 for her anthology of poetry Twelve Swedish Poets. Her translations of Swedish poetry were featured in the journal Poetry International. Mörling’s translations of early-twentieth-century Swedish poet Edith Södergran’s poems, as well as her translation of contemporary Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer’s poem “Grief Gondola, #2,” appeared in The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry, published by Ecco Press in collaboration with Words without Borders. In addition, she continued her work co-editing Swedish Writers on Writing, an anthology to be published by Trinity University Press as a part of the series “The Writers’ World.” Her own work appeared in the anthology Between Water and Song: New Poets for the Twenty-first Century, edited by Norman Minnick and published by White Pine Press. Mörling gave readings at a 9/11 benefit in New York City for New Poets for Peace, at New England College in Henniker, New Hampshire, at SAR, at the Poetry Society of Charleston, South Carolina, and at the Prindle Institute of Ethics at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana. She also received a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship to continue work on her third collection of poems.

Find out more about Malena Mörling by visiting the SAR website (opens in new browser window).

Clara Mantini-Briggs

Clara Mantini-Briggs

“Bats, Rabies, Reporters, and the Wrath of the State: On the Limits of Anthropological Knowledge”
Clara Mantini-Briggs, in collaboration with resident scholar Charles L. Briggs, worked on a book about an outbreak of bat-borne rabies that took place in a Venezuelan rainforest. She and anthropologist Charles Briggs stumbled upon the fatal disease in the summer of 2008, but when they presented their findings to the state, they and their indigenous research collaborators were attacked. This study examines the resulting media frenzy and explores the limits of scholarship and activism. Mantini-Briggs also worked on a book about how racism and discrimination affect the way many physicians diagnose indigenous people in Venezuela.

Find out more about Clara Mantini-Briggs by visiting the SAR website (opens in new browser window).

Charles Stanish

“The Later Prehistory of Southern Tawantinsuyu”
Charles Stanish’s study examines the rise and collapse of the societies that made up the southern half of the Inca Empire—an area of approximately 500,000 square kilometers—across the span of almost four millennia. Beginning around 2000 B.C., it was home to countless complex political groups. In the book he is writing, he uses a game theory framework for the evolution of cooperation, focusing on three factors critical in the development of complex sociopolitical formations: ritualized labor organization, interregional exchange, and organized conflict.

Find out more about Charles Stanish by visiting the SAR website (opens in new browser window).

Deborah Winslow

Deborah Winslow

“Regional Systems Analysis Meets Complexity Science: Economic Change among Potters in Sri Lanka”
For more than 30 years, Deborah Winslow has studied ongoing social and economic change in a small rural community of pottery makers in Sri Lanka. She has used her findings from research in the field and in British and Sri Lankan archives to piece together the community’s history over the past century. She is particularly interested in how the community arises from and is sustained by both small social units such as households and kin groups and large systems such as those of the region, the nation, and beyond. Currently she is using recent research in complexity sciences to draw larger lessons from this localized case study.

Find out more about Deborah Winslow by visiting the SAR website (opens in new browser window).

Follow us: