Transformation(s): Cultural Spaces, Indigenous Peoples, and Arts

Organizers: Patricia Baudino and Jordan Wilson, Anne Ray Interns

Symposium, SAR Boardroom

Friday, May 16, 2014, 1:00–6:30 pm, Free, Reservations Required

Postcommodity. Postcommodity. "Do You Remember When? (Tempe)." 2009Site-specific intervention and mixed media installation (cut concrete, exposed earth, light, sound). Installation view, Arizona State University Art Museum, Ceramics Research Center. Photograph courtesy of Postcommodity.Postcommodity. "Do You Remember When? (Tempe)." 2009Site-specific intervention and mixed media installation (cut concrete, exposed earth, light, sound). Installation view, Arizona State University Art Museum, Ceramics Research Center. Photograph courtesy of Postcommodity.

The theme of transformation exists in many Indigenous nations’ origin stories and histories and can be viewed as continuing in many communities today, revealing the fluid nature of Indigenous identities, cultural and artistic expressions, and political aims. Emanating from a place of Indigenous transformation and activism, many museums (as well as other art and culture spaces) continue to respond to the call for new practices that de-center the traditional knowledge of the museum, transforming what knowledge and expressions are communicated by these institutions. These transformations are altering museum knowledge and practices and, arguably, the purpose of museums themselves.

Indigenous-led transformations within the museum refocus museum practice, exhibition, research, and narratives, demonstrating experiences of Indigenous cultural continuity, survival, self-expression, and resistance. These transformations span time and space, involve issues both global and local, and are innovative and fluid. From community-centered museums (such as tribal cultural centers) to collaborations between Indigenous groups and major institutions, to establishing more inclusive spaces in the world of contemporary art, many of these transformations come from Indigenous peoples and Indigenous-inspired advocacy.

This symposium will highlight the nature of current transformations: where are museums, galleries, and other arts institutions headed in their relationship with Indigenous peoples, cultures, and arts? How do Indigenous artists, scholars, and activists envision the role of museums and art spaces in both the near and distant future? Who, or what, is influencing the current changes in museum and arts practices? How can these spaces influence broader dialogues, perceptions, and social/political movements?

We have invited curators, artists, scholars, and museum professionals to share their thoughts and experiences on these questions, with the intent of assessing the current situation and aspirations for the future of cultural spaces.

Reservations are required to attend this symposium. RSVP to iarc[at]sarsf.org or (505) 954-7205.

Download speaker biographies here (PDF, 134 KB).

Schedule

Check-in (12:30–1:00 p.m.)

Light refreshments served

Session 1: Influences, Intersections, and Ideas (1:00–2:30 p.m.)

Candice Hopkins, independent curator
Jamison Chas Banks, multi-media artist
Rose Simpson, multi-media artist
Moderated by: Patricia Baudino, Anne Ray Intern at the Indian Arts Research Center


Museums, galleries, and other cultural spaces create intersections between people, objects, and ideas. Drawing from panelists’ unique backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives, we will address questions involving who or what influences the changes within cultural spaces, where ideas of transformation find root and inspiration, the dialogues taking place about influence and intersection, and how these are all expressed by individuals and institutions.

½ hour break with light refreshments

Session 2: Relationships, Roles, and Responsibilities (3:00–4:30 p.m.)

Jim Enote, Director, A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center
Patsy Phillips, Director, Museum of Contemporary Native Arts
Kade Twist, Postcommodity, Spirit Abuse
Moderated by: Jordan Wilson, Anne Ray Intern at the Indian Arts Research Center


Spaces of arts and culture have been steadily shifting in their purpose, practices, audiences and, more recently, in leadership. This session seeks to examine the changing roles and relationships associated with institutions and spaces, particularly those operating under Indigenous guidance. With participants coming from three distinct sites of arts and culture, we seek to learn more about their experiences in their respective roles: the particular issues they engage with, how they see the future of Indigenous representation, and the relationships between these spaces and broader communities.

15 minute break

Session 3: Closing Summary (4:45–5:15 p.m.)

Amy Lonetree, Associate Professor, History Department, University of California, Santa Cruz  and Anne Ray Scholar at the School for Advanced Research

Evening Reception with Refreshments (5:15 p.m. onward)



Sponsored by School for Advanced Research

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