Eva Scott Fényes, Leonora Scott Muse Curtin, Leonora Curtin Paloheimo and the Cultural Crafting of Santa Fe

Carmella Padilla

Sparks, SAR Boardroom

Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 3:00–4:00 pm, Free

Eva Fenyes, Leonora S.M. Curtin and Leonora Curtin Paloheimo with artists, 1919Eva Fenyes, Leonora S.M. Curtin and Leonora Curtin Paloheimo with artists, 1919Photograph courtesy of the Archives, Acequia Madre House.Eva Fenyes, Leonora S.M. Curtin and Leonora Curtin Paloheimo with artists, 1919Photograph courtesy of the Archives, Acequia Madre House.

Early twentieth-century Santa Fe was a hotbed of cultural inspiration and innovation. While men such as archaeologists Edgar Lee Hewett, Adolph Bandelier, and Sylvanus Morley, and photographer Charles Fletcher Lummis are commonly hailed as cultural giants of the period, three generations of extraordinary women had a major hand in the cultural crafting of Santa Fe. During their respective lifetimes, Eva Scott Fényes, Leonora Scott Muse Curtin, and Leonora Curtin Paloheimo were at the center of the city’s intellectual and cultural life and economic development. Individually and collectively, the women’s work in art, culture, literature, ethnobotany, historic preservation, and other scholarly and business pursuits supported existing efforts and pioneered new ones including the School of American Research (now the School for Advanced Research), Spanish Colonial Arts Society, the Santa Fe store Native Market, which featured Hispano arts, and El Rancho de las Golondrinas living history museum. The Acequia Madre House, designed by the women in 1926, is now home to the Women’s International Study Center, which honors and preserves their work by advancing the work of contemporary women scholars.

Santa Fe author Carmella Padilla, whose 2009 book El Rancho de las Golondrinas: Living History in New Mexico’s La Ciénega Valley details the women’s lives and legacy, recounts their contributions as Santa Fe is transformed from a rough-and-tumble town in the young New Mexico Territory to the international arts and culture destination of today.

Sponsored by School for Advanced Research and The Historic Santa Fe Foundation

Follow us: