Advanced Seminar Series (108)

Edited volumes resulting from the Advanced Seminar Program that address critical and emerging issues in anthropology and related disciplines.

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Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Afro-Atlantic Dialogues Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology. 2006
American Arrivals American Arrivals Edited by Nancy Foner Soaring immigration to the United States in the past few decades has reawakened both popular and scholarly interest in this important issue. American Arrivals highlights the important insights of anthropology for the field of migration studies. 2003
Ancient Civilization and Trade Ancient Civilization and Trade Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky

The contributors to this volume explore trade’s dynamic role in the growth of early civilizations from the vantage points of archaeology, economics, social anthropology, and cultural geography.

1975
Anthropology in the Margins of the State Anthropology in the Margins of the State Edited by Veena Das and Deborah Poole The very form and reach of the modern state are changing radically under the pressure of globalization. Featuring nine of the leading scholars in the field, this innovative exploration of these transformations develops an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: Africa, Latin America, and South Asia. 2004
Anthropology of Race Anthropology of Race Edited by John Hartigan What do we know about race today? After years of debate and inquiry by anthropologists, the question remains fraught with emotion and the answer remains complicated and uncertain. Anthropology of Race confronts the challenge of formulating an effective rejoinder to new arguments and new data about race, and attempts to address the intense desire to understand race and why it matters. 2013
Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management Edited by Lynne Sebastian and William D. Lipe By most estimates, as much as 90 percent of the archaeology done in the United States today is carried out in the field of cultural resource management. The contributors hope that this book will serve as an impetus in American archaeology for dialogue and debate on how to make CRM projects and programs yield both better archaeology and better public policy. 2010
The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon Edited by Stephen H. Lekson The site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology. 2006
The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters Edited by Gil J. Stein Colonialism and its legacies have emerged as one of the most important research topics in anthropology. Indeed, we now understand that colonialism gave rise to and shaped the discipline. However, the understanding of colonization in anthropology, history, and other fields derives largely from studies of European expansion. 2005
The Archaeology of Lower Central America The Archaeology of Lower Central America Edited by Fredrick W. Lange and Doris Z. Stone This book provides a much-needed overview of the archaeological past, present, and future of lower Central America. It addresses questions such as why the region never produced complex societies like its neighbors to the north and south and takes up themes such as ecological adaptation and subsistence, trade, and sociopolitical development. 1984
Archaic State Interaction Archaic State Interaction Edited by William A. Parkinson and Michael L. Galaty By using a specific case study, the contributors to this book aim to help establish a common theoretical ground for investigating how humans and the societies they built interacted over time. 2010
Archaic States Archaic States Edited by Gary M. Feinman and Joyce Marcus One of the most challenging problems facing contemporary archaeology concerns the operation and diversity of ancient states. This volume addresses how ancient states were structured and how they operated, an understanding of which is key to our ability to interpret a state's rise or fall. 1998
Artisans and Advocacy in the Global Market Artisans and Advocacy in the Global Market Edited by Jeanne Simonelli, Katherine O'Donnell, and June Nash

Contributors to this book explore how crafts — pottery, weaving, basketmaking, storytelling — in Middle America and beyond are a means of making an intangible cultural heritage visible, material, and enduring. Each contribution shows how social science research can evolve into advocacy, collaboration, and friendship.

2015
“B” 
Big Histories, Human Lives Big Histories, Human Lives Edited by John Robb and Timothy R. Pauketat The contributors consider something archaeologists seldom think about: the intersection of micro-scale human experience with large-scale and long-term histories. 2013
Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability Edited by Nancy N. Chen and Lesley A. Sharp

“Biosecurity” has ballooned into an increasingly mundane aspect of human experience, serving as a catchall for the detection, surveillance, containment, and deflection of everything from epidemics and natural disasters to resource scarcities and political insurgencies.

2014
Biology, Brains, and Behavior Biology, Brains, & Behavior Edited by Sue Taylor Parker, Jonas Langer, and Michael L. McKinney An exciting new cross-disciplinary field of biocultural research is emerging at the start of the twenty-first century: developmental evolutionary biology. 2000
Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death Edited by Aubrey Baadsgaard, Alexis T. Boutin, and Jane E. Buikstra Taking cues from current theoretical perspectives and capitalizing on the strengths of new and sophisticated methods of analysis, Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death showcases the vibrancy of bioarchaeological research and its potential for bringing “new life” to the field of mortuary archaeology and the study of human remains. 2012
“C” 
Cash on the Table Cash on the Table Edited by Edward F. Fischer A great deal is at stake in understanding the moral dimensions of economic behavior and markets. Public debates over executive compensation, the fair trade movement, and recent academic inquiries into the limitations of rational-choice paradigms all point to the relevance of moral values in our economic decision-making processes. Moral values inform economic behavior. 2014
A Catalyst for Ideas A Catalyst for Ideas Edited by Vernon L. Scarborough In his thirty-four years as president of the School of American Research, Douglas W. Schwartz's far-reaching vision placed SAR on the intellectual edge of research about humans across the globe. Nowhere is this more evident than in his influence on the field of anthropological archaeology. 2005
Catastrophe & Culture Catastrophe & Culture Edited by Susanna M. Hoffman and Anthony Oliver-Smith At a time of increasing globalization and worldwide vulnerability, the study of disasters has become an important focus for anthropological research-one where the four fields of anthropology are synthesized to address the multidimensionality of the effects to a community’s social structures and relationship to the environment. 2002
Chaco & Hohokam Chaco & Hohokam Edited by Patricia L. Crown and W. James Judge Synthesizing data and current thought about the regional systems of the Chacoans and the Hohokam, eleven archaeologists examine settlement patterns, subsistence economy, social organization, and trade, shedding new light on two of the most sophisticated cultures of the prehistoric Southwest. 1991
Chan Chan Andean Desert City Chan Chan Edited by Michael E. Moseley and Kent C. Day The fourteen essays in this book focus on the Chan Chan-Moche Valley Project and analyze its five-year archaeological study. It includes chapters on irrigation, excavation results, and sociopolitical organization during the Early Intermediate Period in Peru. 1982
Childhood: Origins, Evolution, and Implications Childhood

This collection is the first to specifically address our current understanding of the evolution of human childhood, which in turn significantly affects our interpretations of the evolution of family formation, social organization, cultural transmission, cognition, ontogeny, and the physical and socioemotional needs of children.

2016
The Classic Maya Collapse The Classic Maya Collapse Edited by T. Patrick Culbert

Of the many mysteries surrounding ancient Maya civilization, none has attracted greater interest than its collapse in the eighth and ninth centuries AD. Until recently, speculations on the causes of the collapse have been more numerous than excavated sites in the area. But the past twenty-five years have produced many new findings. In this book, thirteen leading scholars use new data to revise the image of ancient Maya civilization and create a new model of its collapse—a general model of sociopolitical collapse not limited to the cultural history of the Maya alone.

1973
Community Building in the Twenty-First Century Community Building in the Twenty-First Century Edited by Stanley E. Hyland “Community” has long been a critical concept for social scientists, and never more so amid the growing economic inequity, natural and human disasters, and warfare of the opening years of the twenty-first century. In this volume, leading scholar-activists develop a conceptual framework for both the theory and practice of building communities. 2005
Confronting Cancer Confronting Cancer Edited by Juliet McMullin and Diane Weiner In this book, anthropologists examine the lived experiences of individuals confronting cancer and reveal the social context in which prevention and treatment may succeed or fail. 2009
Copán Copán Edited by E. Wyllys Andrews and William L. Fash This volume collects leading scholarship on one of the most important archaeological complexes in the ancient Maya world. The authors-internationally renowned experts who participated in the long-running Copán Acropolis Archaeological Project-address enduring themes in Maya archaeology. 2005
Costly & Cute Costly and Cute Edited by Wenda R. Trevathan and Karen R. Rosenberg

The authors take a broad look at how human infants are similar to and different from the infants of other species, at how our babies have constrained our evolution over the past six million years, and at how they continue to shape the ways we live today.

2016
Critical Anthropology Now Critical Anthropology Now Edited by George E. Marcus Building on the legacy of Writing Culture, Critical Anthropology Now vividly represents the changing nature of anthropological research practice, demonstrating how new and more complicated locations of research-from the boardrooms of multinational corporations to the chat rooms of the Internet-are giving rise to shifts in the character of fieldwork and fieldworker. 1999
Cyborgs & Citadels Cyborgs & Citadels Edited by Gary Lee Downey and Joseph Dumit Some of the country’s most influential thinkers use anthropological methods and theories to examine the practices and practitioners of contemporary science, technology, and medicine in the United States. The authors explore such questions as how science gains authority to direct truth practices, the boundaries between humans and machines, and how science, technology, and medicine contribute to the fashioning of selves. 1998
“D” 
Dangerous Liaisons Dangerous Liaisons Edited by Laura McNamara and Robert A. Rubinstein Dangerous Liaisons is a book about intersections. It is a product of two year’s worth of discussion among a group of ethnographers from four different countries studying war, violence, the military, and the state. 2011
Democracy Democracy Edited by Julia Paley While previous scholars of democracy have proposed one definitive model after another, the authors in this work suggest that democracy is by nature an open ended set of questions about the workings of power—questions best engaged through the dialogical processes of fieldwork and ethnographic writing. 2008
Demographic Anthropology Demographic Anthropology Edited by Ezra B. W. Zubrow The articles in this book explore relationships between demographic variables and culture, emphasizing cultural and biological structures and processes connected to population trends. In addition, the book covers topics dealing with sedentism, kinship, childhood marriage association, and stable and unstable economic growth. 1976
Development & Dispossession Development & Dispossession Edited by Anthony Oliver-Smith Resettlement has been so poorly planned, financed, implemented, and administered that these projects end up being “development disasters.” Because there can be no return to land submerged under a dam-created lake or to a neighborhood buried under a stadium or throughway, the solutions devised to meet the needs of people displaced by development must be durable. The contributors to this volume analyze the failures of existing resettlement policies and propose just such durable solutions. 2009
SAR Press - Disturbing Bodies Disturbing Bodies Edited by Zoë Crossland and Rosemary A. Joyce

Although often considered narrowly in terms of its technical and methodological aspects, forensic practice draws upon multiple dimensions of anthropology, and this volume offers a range of anthropological perspectives on the work of exhumation and the attendant issues.

2015
Dreaming Dreaming Edited by Barbara Tedlock The ten contributors to this book-anthropologists and psychologists-explore the ways in which dreams are remembered, recounted, shared (or not shared), interpreted, and used by people from New Guinea to the Andes. The authors take a major step toward moving the study of dreaming from the margins to the mainstream of anthropological thought. 1992
The Dying Community The Dying Community Edited by Art Gallaher, Jr. and Harland Padfield This book is a thorough exploration of the decline of the little community in the face of urbanization, industrialization, and bureaucratization. Developing a conceptual and theoretical framework for examining community decline and dissolution, the book looks at the relationships between the dying community and its natural resource base, the role of outside political authority, and the social and demographical processes associated with community decline. 1980
“E” 
Elites Ethnographic Issues Elites Edited by George E. Marcus This book is a collection of essays focusing on the role that elites play in shaping modern societies. Critiquing the treatment accorded elites as subjects in recent Western social thought, the essays reflect upon past results and explore directions in the investigation of elite groups by anthropologists. 1983
The Empire of Things The Empire of Things Edited by Fred R. Myers Representing a new wave of thinking about material culture studies-a topic long overdue for reevaluation-the essays in this volume take a fresh look at the relationship between material culture and exchange theory and illuminate the changing patterns of cultural flow in an increasingly global economy and the cultural differences registered in “regimes of value.” 2002
Enduring Conquests Enduring Conquests Edited by Matthew Liebmann and Melissa S. Murphy Enduring Conquests presents new interpretations of Native American experiences under Spanish colonialism and challenges the reader to reexamine long-standing assumptions about the Spanish conquests of the Americas. 2011
Entrepreneurs in Cultural Context Entrepreneurs in Cultural Context Edited by Sidney M. Greenfield, Arnold Strickon, and Robert T. Aubey This book is a collection of essays on business behavior that examine the relationships between business enterprises and family networks. The essays deal with universal subjects that describe the effects of marriage, death, and birth upon the individual and corporate enterprise. 1979
The Evolution of Human Life History The Evolution of Human Life History Edited by Kristen Hawkes and Richard R. Paine Human beings may share 98 percent of their genetic makeup with their nonhuman primate cousins, but they have distinctive life histories. When and why did these uniquely human patterns evolve? To answer that question, this volume brings together specialists in hunter-gatherer behavioral ecology and demography, human growth, development, and nutrition, paleodemography, human paleontology, primatology, and the genomics of aging. 2006
The Evolution of Leadership The Evolution of Leadership Edited by Kevin J. Vaughn, Jelmer W. Eerkens, and John Kantner This book brings together the perspectives of cultural anthropologists and archaeologists to explore why and how leadership emerges and variously becomes institutionalized among disparate human societies. 2010
Explanation of Prehistoric Change Explanation of Prehistoric Change Edited by James N. Hill

What is change? What is stability? How and why does each occur? Can they be predicted? The contributors discuss these questions and others about the nature of change through diverse case studies from Hawaii, Midwestern America, the American Southwest, Iran, and the Teotihuacan Valley in Mexico.

1977
Explorations in Ethnoarchaeology Explorations in Ethnoarchaeology Edited by Richard A. Gould

By observing changes in ancient midden deposits, or modern waste, the ethnoarchaeologist is able to theorize about relationships between these material remains and the human behavior that produced them. The contributors to this book cover diverse societies and attempt to establish behavioral patterns from the study of what humans leave behind.

1978
“F” 
Fat Planet Fat Planet Edited by Eileen P. Anderson-Fye and Alexandra Brewis Fat Planet represents a collaborative effort to consider at a global scale what fat stigma is and what it does to people. 2017
Figuring the Future Figuring the Future Edited by Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham Child laborers in South Asia, child soldiers in Sierra Leone and Uganda, Chinese youth playing computer games to earn virtual gold, youth involved in sex trafficking in the former Soviet republics and Thailand: these are just some of the young people featured in the news of late. To address how and why youth and children have come to seem so important to globalization, the contributors to this book look at the both the spatial relations and the temporal dimensions of globalization in places as far apart as Oakland, California, and Tamatave, Madagascar, in situations as disparate as the idealization of childhood innocence and the brutal lives of street children. 2008
Forces of Compassion Forces of Compassion Edited by Erica Bornstein and Peter Redfield Suffering and charity have a long history. Both human sorrows and attempted remedies were familiar features of life in earlier eras and religious traditions, however, during the final decades of the twentieth century, natural disasters and civilian casualties of war transformed into “humanitarian crises.” In these recurring dramas presented by international media, an extensive network of interstate entities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) supplies assistance to victims. 2011
“G” 
The Gender of Globalization The Gender of Globalization Edited by Nandini Gunewardena & Ann Kingsolver As “globalization” moves rapidly from buzzword to cliché, evaluating the claims of neoliberal capitalism to empower and enrich remains urgently important. The authors in this volume employ feminist, ethnographic methods to examine what free trade and export processing zones, economic liberalization, and currency reform mean to women in Argentina, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Ghana, the United States, India, Jamaica, and many other places. 2008
Global Health in Times of Violence Global Health in Times of Violence Edited by Barbara Rylko-Bauer, Linda Whiteford, and Paul Farmer Over 24 million people have died in these conflicts, and millions more suffered illness and injury. In this volume, leading scholars and practitioners examine the impact of structural, military, and communal violence on health, psychosocial well-being, and health care delivery. By investigating the fields of violence that define our modern world, the authors are able to provide alternative global health paradigms that can be used to develop more effective policies and programs. 2009
The Global Middle Classes The Global Middle Classes Edited by Rachel Heiman, Carla Freeman, and Mark Liechty Surging middle-class aspirations and anxieties throughout the world have recently compelled anthropologists to pay serious attention to middle classes and middle-class spaces, sentiments, lifestyles, labors, and civic engagements. 2012
Globalization, Water, & Health Globalization, Water, & Health Edited by Linda Whiteford and Scott Whiteford This book is about crime and passion, life and death, lofty goals and squalid realities. It is a book about water. Global disparities in health and access to water are two major threats to world stability. 2005
Gray Areas Gray Areas Edited by Philip B. Stafford This volume features ten scholars from anthropology, nursing, sociology, gerontology, human geography, and other disciplines who provide ethnographic case studies exploring critical care decision-making, models of care for people with Alzheimer’s disease, the way residents cope with the limitations, indignities, and opportunities of nursing home life, the roles of family members and nursing home employees, and the formulation of assisted living. 2003
“H” 
Historical Ecology Historical Ecology Edited by Carole L. Crumley Environmental change is one of the most pressing problems facing the world community. In this volume, the authors take a critical step toward establishing a new environmental science by deconstructing the traditional culture/nature dichotomy and placing human/environmental interaction at the center of any new attempts to deal with global environmental change. 1994
History in Person History in Person Edited by Dorothy Holland and Jean Lave Extended conflict situations in Northern Ireland or South Africa, the local effects of the rise of multinational corporations, and conflicts in workplaces, households, and academic fields are all crucibles for the forging of identities. In this volume, the authors bring their research to bear on enduring struggles and the practices of identity within those struggles. This collection of essays explores the innermost, generative aspects of subjects as social, cultural, and historical beings and raises serious questions about long-term conflicts and sustained identities in the world today. 2001
“I” 
Ideology Ideology and Pre-Columbian Civilizations Edited by Arthur A. Demarest and Geoffrey W. Conrad Employing data from central Mexico, the Maya area, coastal Peru, and highland Peru and Bolivia, directors of several major archaeological field projects interpret evidence of prehistoric ideology and address the question, has ideology any relevance in the reconstruction of prehistory? 1992
Images That Move Images That Move Edited by Patricia Spyer and Mary Margaret Steedly Images play a significant part in projects of “poetic world-making” and political transformation. They participate in the production of commensuration or of incommensurability, enact moments of prophecy or exposure, and attract or repel spectators’ attention. But any examination of images in motion must also recognize the blockages and breakdowns that prevent their movement, as well as the enframings or “stickinesses” that trap them in particular places and prevent them from reaching others. 2013
Imperial Formations Imperial Formations Edited by Ann Stoler, Carole McGranahan, and Peter Perdue The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies. 2007
Indians & Energy Indians & Energy Edited by Sherry L. Smith and Brian Frehner The authors consider the complex relationship between development and Indian communities in the Southwest in order to reveal how an understanding of patterns in the past can guide policies and decisions in the future. 2010
“K” 
Katherine Dunham Katherine Dunham Edited by Elizabeth Chin This book explores Katherine Dunham’s contribution to anthropology and the ongoing relevance of her ideas and methodologies, rejecting the idea that art and academics need to be cleanly separated from each other. 2014
Keystone Nations Keystone Nations Edited by Benedict J. Colombi and James F. Brooks The histories and futures of Indigenous peoples and salmon are inextricably bound across the vast ocean expanse and rugged coastlines of the North Pacific. Keystone Nations addresses this enmeshment and the marriage of the biological and social sciences that have led to the research discussed in this book. 2012
“L” 
Last Hunters, First Farmers Last Hunters, First Farmers Edited by T. Douglas Price and Anne Birgitte Gebauer In case studies ranging from the Far East to the American Southwest, the authors of Last Hunters-First Farmers provide a global perspective on contemporary research into the origins of agriculture. Downplaying more traditional explanations of the turn to agriculture, such as the influence of marginal environments and population pressures, the authors emphasize instead the importance of the resource-rich areas in which agriculture began, the complex social organizations already in place, the role of sedentism, and, in some locales, the advent of economic intensification and competition. 1996
Late Lowland Maya Civilization Late Lowland Maya Civilization Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and E. Wyllys Andrews V

In light of new and expanding research, the contributors to this volume premise that the relationship of Classic to Postclassic in the Northern and Southern Maya Lowlands is much more complex than was traditionally thought. The essays offer a useful introduction to current thought regarding the development of Lowland Maya civilization after the collapse of the Classic Period in the South.

1986
Law & Empire in the Pacific Law & Empire in the Pacific Edited by Sally Engle Merry and Donald Brenneis Focusing on the intimate relationship between law, culture, and the production of social knowledge, these essays re-center law in social theory. The authors analyze the transition from chiefdom to capitalism, colonizers’ racial and governmental ideologies, land and labor policies, and contemporary efforts to recuperate indigenous culture and assert or maintain indigenous sovereignty. Speaking to Fijian and Hawaiian circumstances, this volume illuminates the role of legal and archival practice in constructing ethnic and political identities and producing colonial and anthropological knowledge. 2004
Linking the Histories Linking the Histories of Slavery Edited by Bonnie Martin and James F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

2015
Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns Edited by Wendy Ashmore This book is a series of essays that offers a framework for the study of lowland Maya settlement patterns, surveying the range of interpretive ideas about ancient Maya remains. Suggesting hypotheses to guide future research, the articles discuss historical, geographical, chronological, and theoretical matters. 1981
“M” 
Making Alternative Histories Making Alternative Histories Edited by Peter R. Schmidt and Thomas C. Patterson After working in Third World contexts for more than a century, many archaeologists from the West have yet to hear and understand the voices of their colleagues in non-Western cultural settings. In Making Alternative Histories, eleven scholars from Africa, India, Latin America, North America, and Europe debate and discuss how to respond to the erasures of local histories by colonialism, neocolonial influences, and the practice of archaeology and history as we know them today in North America and much of the Western world. 1995
Meaning in Anthropology Meaning in Anthropology

“Cultural anthropology’s main contribution to science has always been the investigation of the range of human cultures and the demonstration of the variety, including variety in symbols and meanings, in these cultures. In recent years, anthropological interest in meaning and symbolism has increased and moved into new types of analysis. Meaning in Anthropology is a useful array of papers representing some of these. Linguistics has had an especially strong influence on this movement, and a number of contributions show that influence.”—Science

1976
Memory, History, and Opposition Memory, History, and Opposition under State Socialism Edited by Rubie S. Watson Eight anthropologists, sociologists, and historians probe the oppositional narratives created by Chinese rural intellectuals, èmigrè Croats, and organized dissenters such as the Djilas of Yugoslavia who constructed and maintained oppositional histories in state socialist societies. 1994
Memory Work Memory Work Edited by Barbara J. Mills and William H. Walker Memory making is a social practice that links people and things together across time and space and ultimately has material consequences. The intersection of matter and social practice becomes archaeologically visible through the deposits created during social activities. The contributors to this volume share a common goal to map out the different ways in which to study social memories in past societies programmatically and tangibly. 2008
Methods and Theories of Anthropological Genetics Methods and Theories of Anthropological Genetics Edited by M. H. Crawford and P. L. Workman This book deals with the methods and theories used to study variation within and among human populations, specifically looking at genetics research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. It presents empirical support for many modern theories in population genetics and demography. 1973
(Mis)managing Migration (Mis)managing Migration Edited by David Griffith Today managed migration is growing in North America. This mirrors the general growth of migration from poorer to richer countries, with more than 200 million people now living outside their natal countries. Faced with this phenomenon, managed migration enables nation-states to regulate those population movements; direct foreign nationals to specific, identified economic sectors that citizens are less likely to care about; match employers who claim labor shortages with highly motivated workers; and offer people from poorer countries higher earning potential abroad through temporary absence from their families and homelands. 2014
Muslim Youth and the 9/11 Generation Muslim Youth and the 9/11 Generation Edited by Adeline Masquelier and Benjamin F. Soares

A new cohort of Muslim youth has arisen since the attacks of 9/11, facilitated by the proliferation of recent communication technologies and the Internet. By focusing on these young people as a heterogeneous global cohort, the contributors to this volume—who draw from a variety of disciplines—show how the study of Muslim youth at this particular historical juncture is relevant to thinking about the anthropology of youth, the anthropology of Islamic and Muslim societies, and the post-9/11 world more generally.

2016
“N” 
Nature, Science, and Religion Nature, Science, and Religion Edited by Catherine M. Tucker This book is about the complicated and provocative ways nature, science, and religion intersect in real settings where people attempt to live in harmony with the physical environment. The contributors explore how scientific knowledge and spiritual beliefs are engaged to shape natural resource management, environmental activism, and political processes. 2012
New Landscapes of Inequality New Landscapes of Inequality Edited by Jane L. Collins, Micaela di Leonardo, & Brett Williams Focusing on the United States, the contributors to this volume analyze how the globalization of newly untrammeled capitalism has exacerbated preexisting inequalities, how the retreat of the benevolent state and the rise of the punitive, imperial state are related, how poorly privatized welfare institutions provide services, how neoliberal and neoconservative ideologies are melding, and how recurrent moral panics misrepresent class, race, gendered, and sexual realities on the ground. 2008
New Perspectives on the Pueblos New Perspectives on the Pueblos Edited by Alfonso Ortiz

This volume, the result of an advanced seminar at the School of American Research, takes a fresh look at Pueblo Indian culture, with chapters on everything from language to religion, prehistory, ecology, and from literature to music.

1972
“O” 
Opening Archaeology Opening Archaeology Edited by Thomas W. Killion In 1989–90, Congress enacted two laws, the National Museum of the American Indian Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, that required museums and other repositories of Native American human remains and cultural items to consult with, share information about, and return some items to federally recognized Indian tribes and Native Alaskan and Hawaiian communities. 2008
The Origins of Language The Origins of Language Edited by Barbara J. King In The Origins of Language, ten primatologists and paleoanthropologists conduct a comprehensive examination of the nonhuman primate data, discussing different views of what language is and suggesting how the primatological perspective can be used to fashion more rigorous theories of language origins and evolution. 1999
The Origins of Maya Civilization The Origins of Maya Civilization Edited by Richard E. W. Adams The contributors to this book scrutinize the data, survey external influences on the early Maya, and consider economics, ecology, demography, and warfare - as well as social and ideological factors - in explaining the transformation of Maya culture from a village-oriented society to one centered on elite classes living in large civic centers with monumental architecture. 1977
Other Intentions Other Intentions Edited by Lawrence Rosen The authors argue that although intentionality might appear to be a wholly abstract phenomenon, it is deeply entwined with the nature and distribution of power, the portrayal of events, the assessment of personhood, the interplay of trust and deception, and the assessment of moral and legal responsibility. 1995
“P” 
Pharmaceutical Self Pharmaceutical Self Edited by Janis H. Jenkins This book addresses a critical contemporary issue—the worldwide proliferation of pharmaceutical use. The contributors explore questions such as: How are culturally constituted selves transformed by regular ingestion of pharmaceutical drugs? Does “being human” increasingly come to mean not only oriented to drugs but also created and regulated by them? From the standpoint of cultural phenomenology, does this reshape human “being”? 2011
Photography in Archaeological Research Photography in Archaeological Research Edited by Elmer Harp, Jr.

Contemporary archaeology is increasingly reliant upon photography as a working tool and as a medium for communicating the results of field research. The chapters in this book provide detailed, practical advice and information on photography in the field—from the air, underwater, and in the lab.

1975
Pluralizing Ethnography Pluralizing Ethnography Edited by John M.Watanabe and Edward F. Fischer This volume brings together eight Maya specialists and a prominent anthropological theorist as discussant to assess the contrasting historical circumstances and emerging cultural futures of Maya in Mexico and Guatemala. 2004
“R” 
Reassembling the Collection Reassembling the Collection Edited by Rodney Harrison, Sarah Byrne, and Anne Clarke Reassembling the Collection presents innovative approaches to the study of historical and contemporary engagements between museums and the various individuals and communities who were (and are) involved in their production and consumption. 2013
Recapturing Anthropology Recapturing Anthropology Edited by Richard G. Fox The ten papers in this volume offer different versions of how and where anthropologists might work usefully in today's world, converging on the issue of how anthropology can best recapture the progressive character its basic concepts, such as "culture," once had. 1991
Reconstructing Prehistoric Pueblo Societies Reconstructing Prehistoric Pueblo Societies Edited by William A. Longacre

The chapters in this book focus on methods and theories used to systematically test hypotheses about prehistoric social organization. The concern with social organization reflects a larger trend in archaeology that stresses the recovery and use of pertinent data for testing ideas and assumptions.

1970
Regimes of Language Regimes of Language Edited by Paul V. Kroskrity In Regimes of Language, ten leading linguistic anthropologists integrate two often segregated domains: politics (without language) and language (without politics). Their essays contribute to an understanding of the role of language ideologies and discursive practices in state formation, nationalism, and the maintenance of ethnic groups, on the one hand, and in the creation of national, ethnic, and professional identities, on the other. 2000
Remaking Life & Death Remaking Life & Death Edited by Sarah Franklin and Margaret Lock The boundaries of life now occupy a place of central concern among biological anthropologists. Because of the centrality of the modern biological definition of life to Euro-American medicine and anthropology, the definition of life itself and its contestation exemplify competing uses of knowledge. 2003
Roots of Conflict Roots of Conflict Edited by Patrick V. Kirch Roots of Conflict presents the efforts of a team of social and natural scientists to understand the complex, systemic linkages between land, climate, crops, human populations, and their cultural structures. 2011
“S” 
Seduced and Betrayed Seduced and Betrayed Edited by Milford Bateman and Kate Maclean, foreword by James K. Galbraith

The contributors contend that over the last twenty years, microfinance policies have exacerbated poverty and exclusion, undermined gender empowerment, underpinned a massive growth in inequality, destroyed solidarity and trust in the community, and, overall, manifestly weakened those local economies of the Global South where it reached critical mass.

Available April 2017
The Seductions of Community The Seductions of Community Edited by Gerald W. Creed The concept of "community" is ubiquitous in the way we talk and think about life in the twentyfirst century. Political and economic projects from rainforest conservation to urban empowerment zones focus on "the community" as the appropriate vehicle and target of change. 2006
Senses of Place Senses of Place Edited by Steven Feld and Keith H. Basso The complex relationship of people to places has come under increasing scholarly scrutiny in recent years as acute global conditions of exile, displacement, and inflamed borders-to say nothing of struggles by indigenous peoples and cultural minorities for ancestral homelands, land rights, and retention of sacred places-have brought the political question of place into sharp focus. 1996
The Shape of Script The Shape of Script Edited by Stephen D. Houston This book builds on earlier projects about the origins and extinctions of script traditions throughout the world in an effort to address the fundamental questions of how and why writing systems change. The contributors—who study ancient scripts from Arabic to Roman, from Bronze Age China to Middle Kingdom Egypt—utilize an approach that views writing less as a technology than as a mode of communication, one that is socially learned and culturally transmitted. 2012
Shipwreck Anthropology Shipwreck Anthropology Edited by Richard A. Gould

“Shipwrecks are part of the legitimate domain of anthropology and can produce results that are as significant for our ability to explain variability in human behavior as any other kind of archaeology, whether it deals with stone tools in a European Paleolithic rockshelter or ceramics contained in a sixteenth-century Spanish shipwreck.” So argues Richard A. Gould, the editor of this volume originating from a 1981 School of American Research advanced seminar.

1983
Simulations in Archaeology Simulations in Archaeology Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff

This book aims to clarify the reasons for using systems models and computer simulations in seeking to understand dynamic cultural patterns. Computer simulations grow logically out of the steps taken by archaeology in the past century: from random data collection to cultural description, proceeding through chronological ordering to interest in process, and finally to systems construction.

1981
Small Worlds Small Worlds Edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, & John Walton Growing unease with grand theories of modernization and global integration brought twelve scholars from four disciplines to the School for Advanced Research for an experiment with the research genre known as microhistory. These authors now call for a return to narrative, detailed analysis on a small scale, and the search for unforeseen meanings embedded in cases. 2008
Street Economies in the Urban Global South Street Economies in the Urban Global South Edited by Karen Tranberg Hansen, Walter E. Little, and B. Lynne Milgram This book focuses on the economic, political, social, and cultural dynamics of street economies across the urban Global South. Although contestations over public space have a long history, Street Economies in the Urban Global South presents the argument that the recent conjuncture of neoliberal economic policies and unprecedented urban growth in the Global South has changed the equation. 2014
Structure and Process in Latin America Structure and Process in Latin America Edited by Arnold Strickon and Sidney M. Greenfield This book provides analysis of social anthropology and approaches to the study of patronage and clientage from work done in Latin America in the late 1960s. Essays include discussions on topics as diverse as the effect of societal structures on the actions of individuals and communities wherein women play the roles of both patrons and clients. 1972
“T” 
Themes in Southwest Prehistory Themes in Southwest Prehistory Edited by George J. Gumerman Two dozen leading archaeologists isolate a number of themes that were central to the process of increasing complexity in prehistoric Southwestern society, including increased food production, a greater degree of sedentism, and a dramatically increasing population. 1994
Things in Motion, Book Cover Things in Motion Edited by Rosemary A. Joyce and Susan D. Gillespie

Complementing the concept of object biography, the contributors to this volume use the complex construct of “itineraries” to trace the places in which objects come to rest or are active, the routes through which things circulate, and the means by which they are moved. The contributors advocate for a broader engagement with the mobility of things, from the point at which things emerge from source material to the organization of their manufacture and use, their subsequent movements as mediated by economic and ritual exchanges, their deposition in places that become archaeological sites, their emergence through research and subsequent curation in museum collections, and their circulation in the contemporary world, including through reproduction in other media. Ultimately, the contributors explore movement as a fundamental capacity of things and demonstrate the dynamic capacity of things in motion.

2015
Tikal Tikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, & Affairs of State Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff New insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal's rulers. 2003
Timely Assets Timely Assets Edited by Elizabeth Emma Ferry and Mandana E. Limbert Oil is running out. What’s more, its final depletion, once relegated to a misty future, now seems imminent. In all the more or less apocalyptic discussions of oil and similar depleted resources, nature, labor, and time converge. This volume focuses on how resources, resource-making, and resource-claiming are entangled with experiences of time. 2008
“U” 
Uruk Mesopotamia & Its Neighbors Uruk Mesopotamia & Its Neighbors Edited by Mitchell S. Rothman In Uruk Mesopotamia & Its Neighbors, ten field and theoretical archaeologists working in the area today offer an overview and analysis of new data and interpretations for Greater Mesopotamia during the late fifth and fourth millennia B.C. 2001
“V” 
The Valley of Mexico The Valley of Mexico Edited by Eric R. Wolf

The chapters in this volume present an important contemporary interpretation of the cultural and archaeological legacy of the Valley of Mexico, a rich and ancient place where the presence of the past is all around. The contributors apply a powerful explanatory model for the development of civilization in terms of environment, population growth, food production, settlement, social differentiation and hierarchy, along with the importance of local and regional interactions involving trade

1976
Violence Violence Edited by Neil L.Whitehead Can we understand violence not as evidence of cultural rupture but as a form of cultural expression itself? Ten prominent scholars engage this question across geographies as diverse at their theoretical positions, in cases drawn from fieldwork in Indonesia, Cambodia, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South America, Sri Lanka, Spain, and the United States. 2004
Vital Relations Vital Relations Edited by Susan McKinnon and Fenella Cannell For more than 150 years, theories of social evolution, development, and modernity have been unanimous in their assumption that kinship organizes simpler, “traditional,” pre-state societies but not complex, “modern,” state societies. And these theories have been unanimous in their presupposition that within modern state-based societies kinship has been relegated to the domestic domain, has lost its economic and political functions, has retained no organizing force in modern political and economic structures and processes, and has become secularized and rationalized. Vital Relations challenges these notions. 2013
“W” 
War in the Tribal Zone War in the Tribal Zone Edited by R. Brian Ferguson and Neil L.Whitehead; With a New Preface by the Editors War in the Tribal Zone, the 1991 anthropology of war classic, is back in print with a new Preface by the editors. Their timely and insightful essay examines the occurrence of ethnic conflict and violence in the decade since the idea of the 'tribal zone' originally was formulated. 1992
Why Forage? Why Forage?

Why Forage? shows that hunting and gathering continues to be a viable and vibrant way of life even in the twenty-first century.

2016
Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest Edited by Patricia L. Crown Women & Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige. 2001
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