News for Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Online Exhibit—“Evolution in Clay: San Felipe Pueblo Artists”

Polychrome bowl with “bat man” design by Daryl Candelaria, clay and paint, 1995.Polychrome bowl with “bat man” design by Daryl Candelaria, clay and paint, 1995.Of this bowl Daryl Candelaria said, "I call him the bat man." The design was inspired from a Mimbres bowl, but he incorporated his own symbols from San Felipe. Courtesy of the School for Advanced Research; SAR.2003-18-2. Photograph by Addison Doty.Polychrome bowl with “bat man” design by Daryl Candelaria, clay and paint, 1995.Of this bowl Daryl Candelaria said, "I call him the bat man." The design was inspired from a Mimbres bowl, but he incorporated his own symbols from San Felipe. Courtesy of the School for Advanced Research; SAR.2003-18-2. Photograph by Addison Doty.

The Indian Arts Research Center and seven San Felipe potters recently curated an online exhibit, focusing on the little-known San Felipe Pueblo pottery. Over the last two years, the IARC convened San Felipe potters Daryl Candelaria, Gerren Candelaria, Hubert Candelario, Ray Garcia, Joseph Latoma, Geraldine Lovato, and Ricardo Ortiz several times to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery-making in their community. During these meetings, the potters grappled with various issues such as how to define pottery from San Felipe and what it means to be a potter from the Pueblo.

Evolution in Clay: San Felipe Pueblo Artists

Virtually unknown to the general public, San Felipe pottery is distinct not in its designs or patterns, but because of a consistent trend of experimentation and innovation that cuts across many art forms at the Pueblo. The online exhibit, which includes twenty-one web pages, over 150 photographs, and seven videos, resides on the School for Advanced Research website in the Education section. In addition to highlighting the seven potters and providing contextual information about San Felipe Pueblo and pottery, IARC provides viewers with an inventory of the Pueblo’s pottery found in major museum collections in the US. This will aid viewers in becoming aware of the existence of the pottery, past and present, since it is not widely known that San Felipe has a history and continuing tradition of pottery-making.

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