News for Thursday, May 6, 2010

Online Exhibits Launched: “Indians 4 Sale: Using Culture as a Commodity” and “Winklil: The Human Body in Ancient Mayan Art”

Rain God (3-D)Rain God (3-D)Tesuque, ca. 1900–1910
Clay and paint
SAR.1999-9-32
Courtesy of Jason S. Ordaz and SAR

Build your own 3-D glasses (PDF, 315 KB) or visit Southwest Crossroads in 3-D to receive a free pair.
Human head (3-D)Human head (3-D)Clay
IAF.M.269
Mesoamerican, n.d.
Courtesy of Jason S. Ordaz and SAR

Build your own 3-D glasses (PDF, 315 KB) or visit Southwest Crossroads in 3-D to receive a free pair.
Rain God (3-D)Human head (3-D)
SAR Staff Viewing 3-DSAR Staff Viewing 3-DKent Owens, SAR Staff, viewing the 3-D photographs in the online exhibits.Kendall TallmadgeKendall TallmadgeKendall Tallmadge presenting her online exhibit to Resident Fellows and SAR Staff.
SAR Staff Viewing 3-DKendall Tallmadge
Dominic HenryDominic HenryDominic Henry presenting his online exhibit to Resident Fellows and SAR Staff.Kendall Tallmadge, Native InternKendall Tallmadge, Native Intern2009–2010 Harvey W. Branigar, Jr. Native Intern
Dominic HenryKendall Tallmadge, Native Intern

2009–2010 IARC interns recently curated two online exhibitions on tourism and commodification and ancient Mayan figures.

Indians 4 Sale: Using Culture as a Commodity

Curated by Kendall Tallmadge

Native American participation in the tourist industry extends over 100 years. The purpose of this exhibit is to introduce you to two different regions of Native America and provide an overview of the ways in which various tribes capitalized on or were affected by tourist presence. In the American Southwest, much of the tourism focuses on traditional arts and crafts, creating a strong artisan presence that continues in the area today. In Wisconsin, the non-reservation Ho-Chunk participated mainly in live cultural displays and interactions. Both regions continue to participate in some form of tourism to this day.

Winklil: The Human Body in Ancient Mayan Art

Curated by Dominic Henry

Winklil is the Yucatec Maya word for body. For this exhibit, winklil will be used to reference the human body and will be a means of exploring the rich and complex world of Mayan art. As you journey through this environment, segments of the culture will be represented by art displaying winklil aesthetics. Moreover, you will see that each discussion references a part of the winklil in the Yucatec Maya language.

The human body was a common motif used by Mayan artists in wide range of media and techniques. Examples of this skill can be found on three-dimensional figurines and architecture. Artists created sculptures formed by bare hands using clay or molds. On buildings, human forms were crafted from stucco and limestone using tools. Originally painted, these forms now appear largely unpainted due to natural wear.

Ancient Maya art from the island of Jaina and other parts of Mesoamerica are presented in this exhibit. References to native cultures of the Southwest and the Andes are also acknowledged by pieces depicting human body aesthetics, adding to the scope of this broad and captivating topic.

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