News for Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Two Titles Pertinent to the Japan Earthquake & Tsunami 2011

Catastrophe & Culture: The Anthropology of Disaster

Edited by Susanna M. Hoffman and Anthony Oliver-Smith

Catastrophe & CultureCatastrophe & Culture
Catastrophe & Culture
Half-Lives & Half-TruthsHalf-Lives & Half-Truths
Half-Lives & Half-Truths

At a time of increasing globalization and worldwide vulnerability, the study of disasters has become an important focus for anthropological research-one where the four fields of anthropology are synthesized to address the multidimensionality of the effects to a community’s social structures and relationship to the environment. Using a variety of natural and technological disasters-including Mexican earthquakes, drought in the Andes and in Africa, the nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl, the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Oakland firestorm, and the Bhopal gas disaster-the authors of this volume explore the potentials of disaster for ecological, political-economic, and cultural approaches to anthropology along with the perspectives of archaeology and history. They also discuss the connection between theory and practice and what anthropology can do for disaster management.

Half-Lives & Half-Truths: Confronting the Radioactive Legacies of the Cold War

Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston

The long Cold War of the twentieth century has ended, but only now are the poisonous legacies of that “first nuclear age” coming to light. Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments. The nations and individuals, many of them members of indigenous or ethnic minority communities, are now demanding information about how the United States and the Soviet Union poisoned them and meaningful remedies for the damage done to them and the generations to come. As nuclear proliferation accelerates, this struggle takes on ever greater urgency.

Follow us: