News for Wednesday, August 3, 2016

August 3, 2016: IARC partners with Santa Fe County Youth Development Program

Collaborative Grid Art, Santa Fe Youth Development ProgramCollaborative Grid Art, Santa Fe Youth Development ProgramCollaborative grid art created by students with the Santa Fe Youth Development Program under the direction of artists Ehren Kee Natay and Nani ChaconCollaborative Grid Art, Santa Fe Youth Development ProgramCollaborative grid art created by students with the Santa Fe Youth Development Program under the direction of artists Ehren Kee Natay and Nani Chacon

The Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research is pleased to announce a partnership with the Santa Fe County Youth Development Program to bring Native artists and incarcerated youth together to promote Native American art, culture, and learning.

Participants in the Santa Fe County Youth Development Program (YDP) often come from challenging home situations and have difficulties in traditional classroom learning environments. YDP works with a number of partner institutions to provide various skills and services to students, but opportunities to interact with and learn about Native American arts and cultures from artists themselves are scarce.

The goal of this partnership is to bring Native American artists to the YDP as a way to provide quality and diverse educational opportunities to youth at their facility. Through hands-on workshops, this partnership seeks foster a sense of pride and self-worth within Native American residents, while encouraging curiosity and learning about diverse cultures within the YDP’s largely Hispanic population. This program will also provide residents with life skills in understanding art as both a means of therapy and as a possible career choice.

In return, Native artists are provided with the opportunity to engage with a broader audience and to share their experiences, culture, and work. As sculptor and program participant Nora Naranjo-Morse, notes:

[This program] not only offers impressionable kids at risk an alternative in their process, it gives the artist a chance to become involved with their community.  Art saved me, it gave me confidence and reassured me when I was full of self-doubt. So to be able to share my enthusiasm especially in this situation was powerful. Art should be shared. It should be wondrous and who better to impart this to than those young men.

Other artists working with this program include multi-media artist Ehren Kee Natay (Navajo/Santo Domingo Pueblo), painter Eliza Naranjo Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo), and potter Jonathan Loretto (Cochiti Pueblo.)

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