News for Monday, April 18, 2016

SAR Announces 2016-2017 Native Artist Fellows

The School for Advanced Research’s (SAR) Indian Arts Research Center offers three artist-in-residence fellowships annually to advance the work of mature and emerging Native artists. The fellowships give artists time to explore new avenues of creativity, grapple with ideas to further advance their work, and to strengthen existing talents. While in residence, the artists can access the School’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) collection of Native arts for research and study. SAR is pleased to announce the 2016-2017 cycle of artists-in-residence.

2016 Ronald and Susan Dubin Fellow

Carol Emarthle-Douglas. Carol Emarthle-Douglas. "Cultural Burdens", 2015.Mixed media. Photo courtesy of the artist.Carol Emarthle-Douglas. "Cultural Burdens", 2015.Mixed media. Photo courtesy of the artist.Contemporary Northern Arapaho-Seminole basket weaver Carol Emarthle-Douglas notes that she is constantly searching for inspiration for designs, shapes, and ideas to produce new baskets. As such, she plans to study the IARC’s seminal collection of Native American Southwest art and the artists represented within to draw inspiration for her innovative work. During her time at SAR, she ultimately plans to construct a basket using the inspiration she gleans from the IARC collection combined with recently learned basketry techniques. Emarthle-Douglas will be in residence from June 15—August 15, 2016.

2016 Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellow

Lomayumtewa Ishii. Lomayumtewa Ishii. "My Thoughts, My Prayers", 2010.Watercolor on paper. Photo courtesy of the artist.Lomayumtewa Ishii. "My Thoughts, My Prayers", 2010.Watercolor on paper. Photo courtesy of the artist.Hopi painter Lomayumtewa Ishii looks forward to devoting time and energy toward expanding his knowledge about Hopi art and being influenced by other tribal lifeways that are represented within the IARC collection. Through intensive research and study, he hopes to gain insight into another time and place that is central to his tribal history. During his tenure, Ishii plans to produce pieces that have historical and contemporary Hopi and Pueblo themes while simultaneously focusing on technical experimentation and his personal artistic growth. Ishii will be in residence from September 1—December 1, 2016.

2017 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow

Luanne Redeye. Luanne Redeye. "Karlene", 2012. Gouache on Arches Paper. Photo courtesy of the artist.Luanne Redeye. "Karlene", 2012. Gouache on Arches Paper. Photo courtesy of the artist.Luanne Redeye is a Seneca painter and beadworker who will be working to complete a highly personal project that weaves together narrative, family relationships, and historical trauma. Through painting and installation, she plans to incorporate hand-made cultural items that will be used as a device to represent larger themes, both difficult and uplifting, that affect Native communities and families. These themes include providing, caring, and teaching as well as alcoholism, domestic violence, and abuse. Her hope is that through this project, she can further explore familial relationships and how historical traumas can be broken. Redeye will be in residence from March 1—May 31, 2017.

The Native artist fellowships support diverse creative disciplines. Recent fellows have included Brent Michael Davids (composer), Maile Andrade (multimedia), Duane Slick (painter), Will Wilson (photographer), Erica Lord (performance artist), Linda Aguilar (basketmaker), Kathleen Wall (sculptor), and Marla Allison (painter).

Contact Elysia Poon (poon[at]sarsf.org) for additional information. Photos available on request.

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