The Salinas Pueblos: One Thousand Years of Village Life in Central New Mexico

Guided by Alison Rautman with an overnight in Mountainair

Field Trip

Friday, April 30–Saturday, May 1, 2010

Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo MissionsGran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo MissionsOriginally part of a stereo photograph, courtesy Jason S. Ordaz.Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo MissionsOriginally part of a stereo photograph, courtesy Jason S. Ordaz.Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions (3-D)Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions (3-D)Stereo photograph courtesy Jason S. Ordaz.

Build your own 3-D glasses (PDF, 315 KB) or visit Southwest Crossroads in 3-D to receive a free pair.
Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions (3-D)Stereo photograph courtesy Jason S. Ordaz.

Build your own 3-D glasses (PDF, 315 KB) or visit Southwest Crossroads in 3-D to receive a free pair.
Wall at Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions (3-D)Wall at Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions (3-D)Stereo photograph courtesy Jason S. Ordaz.

Build your own 3-D glasses (PDF, 315 KB) or visit Southwest Crossroads in 3-D to receive a free pair.
Wall at Gran Quivira, Salinas Pueblo Missions (3-D)Stereo photograph courtesy Jason S. Ordaz.

Build your own 3-D glasses (PDF, 315 KB) or visit Southwest Crossroads in 3-D to receive a free pair.

Near the remote Estancia Basin east of the rugged Manzano Mountains are the remains of three large pueblos and their 17th-century Spanish Colonial missions. This area of New Mexico is a borderland between two ancient Pueblo farming cultures—the Mogollon and the Ancestral Puebloan—as well as bison-hunting groups from the Plains. When the Spanish came, they found the local Jumanos Indians living in Abó, Quarai, and Gran Quivira, now preserved as Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument. These pueblos, with roughly 10,000 people among them, acted as middlemen in regional trade—they traded salt from the saline lakes, corn, and cotton to Plains groups in return for buffalo hides and meat, while exchanging pottery with other pueblos as far north as Santa Fe. In the late 1600s, drought and increasing problems with the Spanish administration led the Indians to move west to the Rio Grande and north to other pueblos along the Manzanos. By the time of the Pueblo Revolt in 1680, the area had already been abandoned.

Explore these pueblos and their Spanish mission churches with archaeologist Alison Rautman from Michigan State University, who has worked in this area for over 20 years. She is most interested in the early villages of pithouses and small adobe pueblos, some of which later grew into the large mission settlements. She studies how people in this area changed from hunting and gathering to farming maize, their use of space within and between households, and the effects of these changes on men’s and women’s roles. During her summer field schools, Dr. Rautman has enjoyed learning about the small towns of Willard and Mountainair, and is eager to share her favorite cafes, shops, and cantinas with us.

Our overnight accommodations will be at the historic Shaffer Hotel in Mountainair, a restored 1920s Pueblo Art Deco Landmark, which features Pop Shaffer’s eclectic curio shop and café.

Activity Level: Moderate

Cost: Per person, varied, includes transportation, all meals, guide honorarium, and accommodations.

  • Double occupancy–$285 or $275 with shared bath.
  • Single occupancy–$333 or $323 with shared bath.

Accomodation: Choose rooms with either Queen or Full-size beds, and either private or shared baths. First reserved, first choice.

Trip Registration: Participation in SAR field trips is one of the benefits of membership. To make registration equitable, we will begin accepting trip reservations Monday, December 14, 2009, 8am to 5pm, for our Spring 2010 field trips. Beginning on that day, please call the SAR Membership Office at (505) 954-7203 to register or to receive additional information about any of these trips. Group size is limited. Reserve your space early.

For more information, visit the Field Trips section.

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