Seminars

2016

Linking the Past to the Future: 2000 Years of Human Resilience and Socioecological Change in the Central American TropicsJanuary 26–28, 2016Linking the Past to the Future: 2000 Years of Human Resilience and Socioecological Change in the Central American TropicsCo-chaired by Keith M. Prufer, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico and Rebecca Zarger, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South FloridaThis seminar brought together researchers from the NSF Human Social Dynamics project (Development and Resilience of Complex Socioeconomic Systems, 2008-2013) focused on understanding environmental change and human-environment relations in southern Belize. The primary goal was the modeling of dynamic human behavioral responses to environmental transformation, and linking these processes to climate dynamics, patterns of settlement, resource exploitation, agricultural intensification, competition, and polity stability.
Innovative Approaches to the Global Water-Energy NexusFebruary 23–25, 2016Innovative Approaches to the Global Water-Energy NexusCo-chaired by E. Christian Wells, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida and Linda M. Whiteford, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South FloridaWhile scientific assessments and engineering solutions are necessary to address coupled water and energy challenges, anthropological research increasingly demonstrates that cultural and political contexts must also be understood and integrated into long-term solutions. This seminar convened a panel of engineers and anthropologists which sought to break down these intellectual barriers and disciplinary silos, and expand on the emerging conceptual synthesis.
New Geospatial Approaches in AnthropologyMarch 6–10, 2016New Geospatial Approaches in AnthropologyCo-chaired by Robert L. Anemone, Professor and Department Head, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Glenn Conroy, Professor, Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington UniversityThis seminar brought together a diverse group of anthropologists and remote sensing specialists—including primatologists, paleoanthropologists, behavioral ecologists, cultural geographers, and archaeologists—who are working at the cutting edge of geospatial data collection and analysis to explore tools, techniques, and approaches that can be used in geospatial analysis of these, and related, anthropological subfields.
A World of Walls: Why Are We Building New Barriers to Divide Us?April 17–21, 2016A World of Walls: Why Are We Building New Barriers to Divide Us?Co-chaired by Laura McAtackney, Associate Professor, Department of Sustainable Heritage Management, Aarhus University and Randall H. McGuire, Distinguished Professor, Department of Anthropology, Binghamton UniversityIn the 21st century, walls appear to supply simple solutions to global problems of violence, human movement and crime. This seminar’s focus on walls offered a materialist emphasis that goes beyond the well-worn terrain of borders by bringing together scholars from a wide variety of disciplines to explore key issues that wall construction provokes.
Spiro Mounds Iconography Presidential SeminarMay 12–14, 2016Spiro Mounds Iconography Presidential SeminarChaired by F. Kent Reilly III, Professor, Department of Anthropology; and Director, Center for the Study of Arts and Symbolism in Ancient America, Texas State UniversityThis SAR Presidential Seminar brought together a dozen prominent archaeologists to reassess the artifacts, symbols, and motifs recovered from the Craig Mound, part of Spiro Mounds archaeological site in eastern Oklahoma, in preparation for an upcoming exhibition titled, Recovering Ancient Spiro.
How Nature Works, Advanced SeminarSeptember 25–29, 2016How Nature WorksCo-chaired by Sarah Besky, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology & Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University; Alex Blanchette, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Tufts University; and Naisargi Dave, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of TorontoThis seminar aimed to develop an anthropology of labor that is attuned and accountable to the potentially irreversible effects of climate change, extinction, and deforestation by exploring sites where seemingly “natural” beings have been radically modified by human activity, and seemingly enlisted into diverse work regimens.
Reassembling The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians: Toward a Collaborative Critical Edition of Franz Boas and George Hunt’s Pioneering 1897 MonographOctober 25–27, 2016Reassembling The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians: Toward a Collaborative Critical Edition of Franz Boas and George Hunt’s Pioneering 1897 MonographCo-chaired by Judith Berman, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria and Aaron Glass, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Bard Graduate CenterAn international, collaborative project is bringing anthropologists together with Kwakwaka’wakw elders, artists and community researchers in order to produce an innovative critical edition—in both print and digital formats— of Franz Boaz’ seminal text, The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians. It will reunite the original text with the vast archival materials relating to the book’s production and afterlife, and with contemporary Kwakwaka’wakw perspectives.
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