Seminars

2015

Chaco and Cahokia: Histories, Landscapes, and HinterlandsMarch 3–4, 2015Chaco and Cahokia: Histories, Landscapes, and HinterlandsCo-chaired by Danielle Benden, Senior Curator of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Madison and Brenda K. Todd, Project Manager/Cultural Resource Specialist, Denver Service Center - Planning Division, National Park ServiceThis seminar convened to evaluate the current state of research and theoretical issues for Chaco and Cahokia, their respective hinterlands, and to lay the groundwork for a truly continental archaeology by considering connections to Mesoamerica.
The Colonization of Africa by Early Anthropoid PrimatesMarch 17–19, 2015The Colonization of Africa by Early Anthropoid PrimatesChaired by K. Christopher Beard, Foundation Distinguished Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of KansasResearchers took advantage of the lull in fieldwork due to disruptions caused by events following the Arab Spring to compare pivotal fossils from three disparate North African localities side-by-side, to discuss and evaluate geological evidence for the ages of the various fossil sites, and to develop a broader consensus on the evolutionary and ecological consequences of the anthropoid colonization of Africa.
Land, Water, and Empire in the High-Altitude AtacamaApril 11–13, 2015Land, Water, and Empire in the High-Altitude AtacamaCo-chaired by Frances Hayashida, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico; César Parcero-Oubiña, Staff Scientist, Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Diego Salazar, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Universidad de Chile; and Andrés Troncoso, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Universidad de ChileWorking within the framework of political ecology, the Topaín Archaeological Project is addressing the question of how the Inka kept their workers, personnel, royals, and the military fed since little is currently known about Inka agriculture. This seminar was convened to explore long-term, historical perspectives on changes in local landscapes and livelihoods within broader political economies and complex relationships between water, land, politics, and society.
Understanding Patriarchal BeliefsApril 19–23, 2015The Psychology of PatriarchyCo-chaired by Adriana Manago, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Western Washington University and Holly F. Mathews, Professor, Department of Anthropology, East Carolina UniversityBringing together an interdisciplinary group of scholars with extensive field research experience in cultures where patriarchal beliefs and practices continue to impact the daily lives of women, this seminar was organized to develop new theories explicating the ways that culturally situated systems of patriarchy, family, and power are both shaped by and constitutive of individual desires, goals, and identities.
Transformations in Social Citizenship: Stratification, Risk, and Responsibility in Health Care ReformOctober 6–8, 2015Transformations in Social Citizenship: Stratification, Risk and Responsibility in Health Care ReformCo-chaired by Heide Castañeda, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida and Jessica Mulligan, Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Providence CollegeBy convening a network of medical anthropologists and allied social scientists who are actively researching the Affordable Care Act, the goal of the seminar was to assemble a more holistic, comparative portrait of the law that is richer than what any one researcher could produce in isolation and is attuned to the complex experiences of implementation that are often lost in quantitative and survey research.
Puebloan Societies: New Perspectives Across the SubfieldsOctober 18–22, 2015Puebloan Societies: New Perspectives Across the SubfieldsChaired by Peter Whiteley, Curator of North American Ethnology, Department of Anthropology, American Museum of Natural HistoryThis seminar’s purpose was to address Puebloan social formations of the past and present from a variety of comparative perspectives using a four-field anthropological approach, and to reconnect the currently disjointed anthropological sub-fields, especially archaeology and ethnology, and to develop new perspectives on Puebloan social societies.
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