Seminars

2014

Obesity, Upward Mobility, and Symbolic Body Capital in a Rapidly Changing WorldMarch 2–6, 2014Obesity, Upward Mobility, and Symbolic Body Capital in a Rapidly Changing WorldCo-chaired by Eileen Anderson-Fye, Robson Junior Professor, Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University and Alexandra Brewis Slade, Director & President’s Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State UniversityThis advanced seminar explored the work of diverse scholars within and beyond anthropology that addresses the iterative relationships between changing physical bodies, shifting body norms, and local economic, ecological, and developmental transitions cross-culturally.
Migration, Group Formation, and Economic Development in the Pueblo WorldMarch 17–19, 2014Migration, Group Formation, and Economic Development in the Pueblo WorldCo-chaired by Timothy A. Kohler, Regent's Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington State University and Scott G. Ortman, Omidyar Fellow and Lightfoot Fellow, Santa Fe Institute and Crow Canyon Archaeological CenterFor the past decade, the Village Ecodynamics Project has been investigating coupled natural and human systems in the prehispanic U.S. Southwest through empirical archaeological research and agent-based modeling. The project team met at SAR to discuss how to best utilize these data to address research questions on migration, group formation, and co-evolution of institutions and economies.
Ambiguity and Experimentation: A Collaborative Ethnography of the StateApril 8–10, 2014Ambiguity and Experimentation: A Collaborative Ethnography of the StateCo-chaired by Penelope Harvey, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Manchester, U.K. and Deborah Poole, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins UniversityThis seminar convened a team of British, U.S., and Peruvian anthropologists who collectively carried out an ethnography of regional governance and state decentralization in Cusco, Peru.
The Thailand Archaeometallurgy Project: A Holistic Approach to Characterizing Metallurgy's Societal Impact in Prehistoric Southeast AsiaApril 29–May 1, 2014The Thailand Archaeometallurgy Project: A Holistic Approach to Characterizing Metallurgy's Societal Impact in Prehistoric Southeast AsiaCo-chaired by Vincent Pigott, Consulting Scholar, Asian Section, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and Judy Voelker, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy, Northern Kentucky UniversityThe Thailand Archaeometallurgy Project's (TAP) excavations of three prehistoric copper-production sites in the Khao Wong Prachan Valley were conducted from 1986–1994. This seminar assembled the multinational team for the first time in one place to discuss their recent synthesis of inter- and intra-site chronology and context and to determine what analyses remain to be completed.
Conservation Seminar IIMay 8–10, 2014Conservation Seminar IIFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar; Laura Elliff; and Landis SmithA second IARC seminar on the conservation of indigenous collections was organized in May 2014 to address major outcomes of the 2013 seminar. Seminar participants developed the first draft of a set of ethical and practical guidelines for collaborative conservation work including the documentation of collections, the conservation decision-making process and treatments.
Costly and Cute: How Helpless Newborns Made Us HumanMay 11–15, 2014Costly and Cute: How Helpless Newborns Made Us HumanCo-chaired by Karen R. Rosenberg, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Delaware and Wenda R. Trevathan, Regents Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, New Mexico State University, Las CrucesParticipants in this seminar examined infant helplessness from biological, cultural, cognitive, behavioral, obstetrical, and pediatric points of view to understand how such a costly pattern of development evolved and what benefits it conferred on humans.
Negotiating Structural Vulnerability in Cancer Control: Contemporary Challenges for Applied Anthropology seminar participantsSeptember 24–25, 2014Negotiating Structural Vulnerability in Cancer Control: Contemporary Challenges for Applied AnthropologyCo-chaired by Julie Armin, Doctoral Candidate/Research Coordinator, Anthropology and Family & Community Medicine, University of Arizona; Nancy Burke, Associate Professor of Medical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine, UC - San Francisco; and Laura Eichelberger, Cancer Prevention Fellow, Nutritional Epidemiological Branch, National Cancer InstituteThis seminar focused on cancer control research among structurally vulnerable populations, shifting the analytic focus from the individual to the individual in her social, economic, and cultural contexts to offer insight into such “bottom line” concerns as lowering the cost of care and improving health outcomes, while also addressing, and potentially ameliorating, the effects of social inequality.
Questioning the Global in Global PsychiatryOctober 7–9, 2014Questioning the “Global” in Global PsychiatryCo-chaired by Elizabeth Davis, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Princeton University and Li Zhang, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of California, DavisThis seminar worked to develop a complex and ethnographically grounded counter-narrative to that of the seemingly self-evident ascent of neurobiological psychiatry. Using analyses of the ways in which global psychiatry is responding to an expanding gap between clinical care and experimental laboratory research, and through the exploration of psychiatric conceptualizations of culture and its role in the genesis, expression, and treatment of mental illness, seminar participants focused on probing differences within global psychiatry.
The Promise Of InfrastructureNovember 2–6, 2014The Promise of InfrastructureCo-chaired by Nikhil S. Anand, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Environment and Society, University of Minnesota; Hannah C. Appel, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles; and Akhil Gupta, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los AngelesThis seminar used ethnographic research to theorize infrastructure as cultural forms and materializations of certain ideas of order and social inequality in cross cultural contexts.
Conservation Seminar III, Group PhotoNovember 13–14, 2014Conservation Seminar lllFacilitated by Laura Elliff and Landis SmithA third seminar in the Collaborative Conservation of Indigenous Collections series was held at the SAR IARC November 13-14, 2014. The seminar was organized to plan an April 2015 pilot workshop on the collaborative conservation and collections stewardship to be held at the Haakú Museum in Acoma Pueblo. Collaborative planning of the workshop included tribal museum leaders, conservators, and collections-based museum staff.
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