Seminars

2012

The Dynamics of Social Networks in the Late Prehispanic SouthwestMarch 13–14, 2012The Dynamics of Social Networks in the Late Prehispanic SouthwestCo-chaired by Jeffery J. Clark, Preservation Archaeologist, Archaeology Southwest; Deborah Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist, Archaeology Southwest; and Barbara J. Mills, Professor and Director, Department of Anthropology, University of ArizonaThis seminar brought together an interdisciplinary team for discussion of their NSF-funded project that was attempting to understand the coalescence and collapse of populations in the western U.S. Southwest during the tumultuous period from AD 1200 to 1550.
Gerren CandelariaMarch 14, 2012San Felipe Potters Seminar IFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Director, IARC, School for Advanced ResearchIn 2012, the IARC brought together seven potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community.
Disturbing Bodies: A Relational Exploration of Forensic Archaeological PracticeMarch 25–29, 2012Disturbing Bodies: A Relational Exploration of Forensic Archaeological PracticeCo-chaired by Zoë Crossland, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University and Rosemary A. Joyce, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, BerkeleyThe aim of this seminar was to discuss the values and beliefs that underlie forensic exhumation, and to explore the tensions that arise in the practice of forensic archaeological work.
The Role of Social Networks in Disaster Recovery in Mexico, Ecuador, and the U.S.April 10–11, 2012The Role of Social Networks in Disaster Recovery in Mexico, Ecuador, and the U.S.Co-chaired by Eric C. Jones, Research Scientist, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Greensboro and Linda M. Whiteford, Office of the Provost, University of South FloridaThis seminar convened to more fully develop theory on collective action following extreme events, for which it is not only variation in networks that is important, but also the comparative or cultural context in which these networks are activated.
Things in Motion: Object Histories, Biographies, and ItinerariesMay 8–9, 2012Things in Motion: Object Histories, Biographies, and ItinerariesCo-chaired by Susan D. Gillespie, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida and Rosemary A. Joyce, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, BerkeleyObjects accrue histories as they move from place to place, person to person. This seminar explored how object histories may alternatively be viewed as “itineraries,” strings of places where objects come to rest or are active, the routes through which things circulate and the means by which they come to move.
Geraldine LovatoMay 11, 2012San Felipe Potters Seminar IIFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Director, IARC, School for Advanced ResearchIn 2012, the IARC brought together seven potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community.
The Evolutionary Demography of Fertility: The Influence of Social NetworksJune 19–20, 2012The Evolutionary Demography of Fertility: The Influence of Social NetworksCo-chaired by Daniel Hruschka, Assistant Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University ; Rebecca Sear, Reader, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, UK; and Mary Shenk, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, ColumbiaThis seminar brought together an international team of researchers to develop a project and plan related grant proposals on the use of evolutionary demography to investigate the effects of individual characteristics and social influences on fertility.
Hubert CandelarioJune 25, 2012San Felipe Potters Seminar IIIFacilitated by Cynthia Chavez Lamar, Director, IARC, School for Advanced ResearchIn 2012, the IARC brought together seven potters from San Felipe Pueblo to discuss the past, present, and future of pottery making in their community.
Microfinance: Assessing the Economic and Cultural Implications of Microfinance on Poverty from Cross-Cultural PerspectivesSeptember 25–27, 2012Microfinance: Assessing the Economic and Cultural Implications of Microfinance on Poverty from Cross-Cultural PerspectivesCo-chaired by Milford Bateman, Visiting Professor of Economics, University of Juraj Dobrila Pula, Croatia and Freelance Consultant and Lamia Karim, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of OregonThis research team seminar examined the popular narrative that microfinance has achieved success in many countries. The focus was to assess the impact of microfinance on the community, rather than just upon a set of poor individuals or women.
Artisan Production and the World MarketOctober 3–4, 2012Artisan Production and the World Market: Collaborating in Theory, Methods, and PracticeCo-chaired by June Nash, Distinguished Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, City University of New York; Katherine O'Donnell, Professor, Department of Sociology, Hartwick College; and Jeanne Simonelli, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Wake Forest UniversityThe purpose of this seminar, a collaborative arrangement between SAR and the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), was to bring together an interdisciplinary, intercultural group of artisans and the scholars who work with them to discuss the production, marketing, and consumption of crafts and boutique food products.
Uniting the Histories of Slavery in North AmericaOctober 12–13, 2012Uniting the Histories of Slavery in North AmericaCo-chaired by James F. Brooks, President and CEO, School for Advanced Research and Bonnie Martin, Research Associate, Department of History, Southern Methodist UniversityThis seminar brought together specialists in history, anthropology, folklore, and psychology to provide a broader understanding to an array of local and regional studies of new forms of bondage—in the past and today—that take us beyond the well-known studies of slavery in the east.
Fieldwork in PhilosophyOctober 26–28, 2012Fieldwork in PhilosophyChaired by Ann Stoler, Willy Brandt Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Historical Studies, The New School for Social ResearchLegend has it that when a discipline is in crisis, it invariably turns to philosophy. While such claims tend to contain a grain of truth, the organizers of this short seminar saw the current “philosophical turn” in anthropology very differently—as a move that marks a broader set of emergent realignments in anthropology’s approach to how concepts operate in the world. Rather than seeing this as a moment of anthropology in crisis, this seminar explored it as a vital, generative moment of possible synergy between the two disciplines.
Multiple Perspectives on the Evolution of ChildhoodNovember 4–8, 2012Multiple Perspectives on the Evolution of ChildhoodCo-chaired by Alyssa N. Crittenden, Lincy Foundation Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Courtney L. Meehan, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington State UniversityResearch into the evolution of childhood and the diversity of children's experiences around the world attracted significant attention in recent years. However, an international group of scholars had yet to come together to address divergent views and integrate current theoretical and methodological divides. This seminar convened in order to bring that divergent group of scholars and research together.
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